Anatomy

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Combination therapy may be more effective against the most common ovarian cancer

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:37 am
    High-grade serous ovarian cancer often responds well to the chemotherapy drug carboplatin, but why it so frequently comes back after treatment has been a medical mystery. Now a team of researchers has discovered that a subset of tumor cells that don’t produce the protein CA125, a biomarker used to test for ovarian cancer, has an enhanced ability to repair their DNA and resist programmed cell death — which allows the cells to evade the drug and live long enough to regrow the original tumor.
  • StayWell Offers Instant Downloads, Licensing of Medical Art to...

    Anatomy News
    4 Aug 2015 | 3:48 pm
    … for access to its KramesArt anatomical art work and drawings, StayWell … soon. Downloadable files include normal anatomy, disease states, treatments, and procedures … are scientifically accurate and reviewed by leading medical specialists. All StayWell medical illustrators …
  • From pluripotency to totipotency

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    4 Aug 2015 | 11:29 am
    While it is already possible to obtain in vitro pluripotent cells (i.e., cells capable of generating all tissues of an embryo) from any cell type, researchers have pushed the limits of science even further. They managed to obtain totipotent cells with the same characteristics as those of the earliest embryonic stages and with even more interesting properties.
  • April Beckett

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    topfemaleexecutives
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:36 pm
    Title: EMT Company: Family Medical Transport Location: Mt. Pleasant, S.C. The time she was working w
  • The benefits of good posture Has anyone ever told you, “Stand up...

    WordPress Tag: Physiology
    scientiflix
    4 Aug 2015 | 10:54 am
    The benefits of good posture Has anyone ever told you, “Stand up straight!” or scolded you for slouching at a family dinner? Comments like that might be annoying—but they’re not wrong. Your posture is the foundation for every movement your body makes and can determine how well your body adapts to the stresses on it. Murat Dalkilinç gives the pros of good posture. View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-benefits-of-good-posture-murat-dalkinic Lesson by Murat Dalkilinç, animation by Nadav Arbel. By: TED-Ed.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • From pluripotency to totipotency

    4 Aug 2015 | 11:29 am
    While it is already possible to obtain in vitro pluripotent cells (i.e., cells capable of generating all tissues of an embryo) from any cell type, researchers have pushed the limits of science even further. They managed to obtain totipotent cells with the same characteristics as those of the earliest embryonic stages and with even more interesting properties.
  • Combination therapy may be more effective against the most common ovarian cancer

    3 Aug 2015 | 5:37 am
    High-grade serous ovarian cancer often responds well to the chemotherapy drug carboplatin, but why it so frequently comes back after treatment has been a medical mystery. Now a team of researchers has discovered that a subset of tumor cells that don’t produce the protein CA125, a biomarker used to test for ovarian cancer, has an enhanced ability to repair their DNA and resist programmed cell death — which allows the cells to evade the drug and live long enough to regrow the original tumor.
  • Study sheds surprising light on the causes of cerebral palsy

    3 Aug 2015 | 5:33 am
    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies. In a new game-changing study, a research team has uncovered strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy that turns experts' understanding of the condition on its head.
  • There may be a complex market living in your gut

    1 Aug 2015 | 5:26 am
    Conventional theories used by economists for the past 150 years to explain how societies buy, sell, and trade goods and services may be able to unlock mysteries about the behavior of microbial life on Earth, according to a study.
  • Key gene found to drive kidney disease severity

    31 Jul 2015 | 3:28 pm
    Patients with higher levels of a key protein are at greater risk for severe kidney disease, experts report.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • April Beckett

    topfemaleexecutives
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:36 pm
    Title: EMT Company: Family Medical Transport Location: Mt. Pleasant, S.C. The time she was working w
  • Sketchdump #285 – gesture drawing

    lyra
    2 Aug 2015 | 1:14 pm
    It’s been a while since the last gesture drawing post, right? Have some more!
  • 10 Fascinating Mysteries Of Life That Science Can’t Explain

    Muhammed Zuzzer
    2 Aug 2015 | 2:12 am
    Cows Always Face North Or South While Eating Most people don’t give much thought to grazing cows, but when a team of scientists went through thousands of Google Earth’s satellite images of cows, they stumbled upon a detail that we have missed for millennia: Cows will stand along the Earth’s magnetic poles—facing north and south—whenever they’re grazing or resting. The pattern remained consistent regardless of wind or other factors, and nobody’s quite sure why. While some animals are known to contain an internal compass, this is the first time it’s been found in a large mammal.
  • Abstract | PAT_6837.jpg

    The Pictures Show
    1 Aug 2015 | 7:48 pm
    LG G4 Rated as the Best Camera Phone for Pictures @ Searchy.One Search Description From Photographer if Any: Abstract symbol of fear and death By phathawut Source: 500px.com
  • PAT_6837.jpg

    NinhTran09
    1 Aug 2015 | 7:46 pm
    PAT_6837.jpg http://ift.tt/1fUwSGj @phathawut: Abstract symbol of fear and death #Abstract #Trending #Popular #Buzzing #Viral #Picture
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • The benefits of good posture Has anyone ever told you, “Stand up...

    scientiflix
    4 Aug 2015 | 10:54 am
    The benefits of good posture Has anyone ever told you, “Stand up straight!” or scolded you for slouching at a family dinner? Comments like that might be annoying—but they’re not wrong. Your posture is the foundation for every movement your body makes and can determine how well your body adapts to the stresses on it. Murat Dalkilinç gives the pros of good posture. View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-benefits-of-good-posture-murat-dalkinic Lesson by Murat Dalkilinç, animation by Nadav Arbel. By: TED-Ed.
  • How Big Could a TITAN Be in Real Life? (Because Science w/ Kyle...

    scientiflix
    4 Aug 2015 | 8:20 am
    How Big Could a TITAN Be in Real Life? (Because Science w/ Kyle Hill) Ever wonder how a Titan from Attack on Titan would look in the real world? Kyle cuts them down to size on this week’s Because Science! By: Nerdist.
  • Yes Virginia, the Appendix Does Have a Purpose

    drbforciea
    4 Aug 2015 | 7:59 am
    Students watch in amazement as the abdominal cavity of the cadaver is opened. We remove a few structures and after a few minutes we get to the colon. The colon begins with a sac-like structure called the cecum. As we take a closer look at the cecum we see a protruding, finger-like projection. “This is the appendix” the instructor announces to the students. “It has no known function” he relays with a confidence built on years of study. Well, that statement is now in serious question. According to researchers from Duke University the appendix does indeed have a purpose. It has to do…
  • Bestselling student guide to research methods updated

    Human Kinetics
    4 Aug 2015 | 6:41 am
    The bestselling text for physiology and exercise science students, has just been updated and revised. Research Methods in Physical Activity guides students through the research process, introducing methods and tools specifically for physiology and exercise science disciplines, including the sub-disciplines of physiotherapy and rehabilitation and occupational therapy. It provides step-by-step information for every aspect of the research process, from identifying and devising research questions to analysing data and compiling results for presentation. Lecturers can access a suite of ancillary…
  • Structure & Function of Cell

    farhannadaf
    3 Aug 2015 | 10:43 pm
    Here’s a video demonstration of overview of Cell Structure. You can also download the presentation about Structure and Function of Cell, Tissues and Genetic control.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) - NHSChoices video

    21 Jul 2015 | 9:14 am
    NHSChoices: Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of arthritis that affects parts of the spine. In this video, an expert describes the long-term effects of the condition, its most common symptoms and the different treatments available.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cYuwDkykoA Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • What happens when someone gets heat stroke? TED-Ed video

    14 Jul 2015 | 4:00 am
    Have you ever suffered from exertional heat stroke? This condition is caused by intense activity in the heat and is one of the top three killers of athletes and soldiers in training. Douglas J. Casa explains heat stroke's tremendous effects on the human body and details an action plan in case it ever happens to someone you know.Lesson by Douglas J. Casa, animation by Cinematic. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Bedbugs - National Geographic video

    2 Jul 2015 | 7:30 am
    An army of these can attack a person 500 times in one night:How To Get Rid of Bed Bugs - The Home Depot video: Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Healthcare social media #HCSM - top articles

    18 Jun 2015 | 4:00 am
    Here are my suggestions for some of the top articles related to healthcare social media (#HCSM) in the past 2-4 weeks:Impact of Social Media on Dissemination of Research: close correlation between when I tweet the paper and downloads. Prior to me blogging and tweeting about the paper, it was downloaded twice. After, it immediately got 140 downloads http://buff.ly/1yf4ylWIs It Okay to Choose a Children's Hospital Based on Social Media Presence? http://buff.ly/10mSLae - Apparently, yes, it works.Self-organization on social media: endo-exo bursts and baseline fluctuations. http://buff.ly/10mTMzc…
  • Neurological center at Cleveland Clinic Florida: Egil and Pauline Braathen Center

    28 May 2015 | 10:59 am
    A look inside the Egil and Pauline Braathen Center -- the brand new 144,000 square foot Braathen Center houses world-class neurological services and comprehensive cancer program (video):"Born in London, Mrs. Braathen was a fashion model and buyer and subsequently developed her own fashion business. She married Egil Braathen, a Norwegian businessman, who became one of the country’s wealthiest men, owning and developing property throughout Norway and in other parts of the world, including the United States. He died in 2009, after suffering the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s disease for…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • The effect of prenatal maternal infection on respiratory function in mouse offspring: evidence for enhanced chemosensitivity

    Samarasinghe, T. D., Sands, S. A., Skuza, E. M., Joshi, M. S., Nold-Petry, C. A., Berger, P. J.
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:30 am
    Systemic maternal inflammation is implicated in preterm birth and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and may induce morbidities including reduced pulmonary function, sleep-disordered breathing, and cardiovascular disorders. Here we test the hypothesis that antenatal maternal inflammation per se causes altered alveolar development and increased chemoreflex sensitivity that persists beyond infancy. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (150 μg/kg ip) to induce maternal inflammation or saline (SHAM) at embryonic day 16 (randomized). Pups were weighed daily. On days 7,…
  • Modulating exercise-induced hormesis: Does less equal more?

    Peake, J. M., Markworth, J. F., Nosaka, K., Raastad, T., Wadley, G. D., Coffey, V. G.
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:30 am
    Hormesis encompasses the notion that low levels of stress stimulate or upregulate existing cellular and molecular pathways that improve the capacity of cells and organisms to withstand greater stress. This notion underlies much of what we know about how exercise conditions the body and induces long-term adaptations. During exercise, the body is exposed to various forms of stress, including thermal, metabolic, hypoxic, oxidative, and mechanical stress. These stressors activate biochemical messengers, which in turn activate various signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and adaptive…
  • The effect of increased lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on upper airway obstruction during sleep

    Biselli, P., Grossman, P. R., Kirkness, J. P., Patil, S. P., Smith, P. L., Schwartz, A. R., Schneider, H.
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:30 am
    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit increases in lung volume due to expiratory airflow limitation. Increases in lung volumes may affect upper airway patency and compensatory responses to inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep. We hypothesized that COPD patients have less collapsible airways inversely proportional to their lung volumes, and that the presence of expiratory airflow limitation limits duty cycle responses to defend ventilation in the presence of IFL. We enrolled 18 COPD patients and 18 controls, matched by age, body mass index, sex, and…
  • An estimation of mechanical stress on alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening and closure

    Chen, Z.-l., Song, Y.-l., Hu, Z.-y., Zhang, S., Chen, Y.-z.
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:30 am
    Alveolar overdistension and mechanical stresses generated by repetitive opening and closing of small airways and alveoli have been widely recognized as two primary mechanistic factors that may contribute to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury. A long-duration exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to even small, shear stresses could lead to the changes in cytoskeleton and the production of inflammatory mediators. In this paper, we have made an attempt to estimate in situ the magnitudes of mechanical stresses exerted on the alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening by…
  • Pneumothorax effects on pulmonary acoustic transmission

    Mansy, H. A., Balk, R. A., Warren, W. H., Royston, T. J., Dai, Z., Peng, Y., Sandler, R. H.
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:30 am
    Pneumothorax (PTX) is an abnormal accumulation of air between the lung and the chest wall. It is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening condition encountered in patients who are critically ill or have experienced trauma. Auscultatory signs of PTX include decreased breath sounds during the physical examination. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the changes in sound transmission in the thorax due to PTX in humans. Nineteen human subjects who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery, during which lung collapse is a normal part of the surgery, participated…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Digestive System News

  • Tiger nuts re a resistant starch

    4 Aug 2015 | 2:42 pm
    … starch that is not digested in the stomach or small intestine, … the bacteria in the gut. The normal human gut has hundreds … intestines, helping to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria, Kresser … in your digestive system. And because you can't digest or …
  • How many calories do these food swaps actually save you?

    4 Aug 2015 | 2:19 pm
    … long-haul. What is? Making small, healthy changes that work with your … feel more satisfied, keep your digestive system in working order, and … whole fruit, which keeps your digestive system in working order … to eat your sandwich, your stomach has more time to …
  • These foods were made to go together

    4 Aug 2015 | 1:56 pm
    … together they are substantially healthier than they would be … keep your digestive system and, in turn, your whole body healthy. … prebiotics team up in your gut] Grilled meat and spice … cookbook is “Weeknight Wonders: Delicious, Healthy Dinners in 30 Minutes …
  • Weight loss culprits

    4 Aug 2015 | 12:50 pm
    … not lose anymore weight. My stomach is going to be … with gut health. Unfortunately, most people don’t usually realize their gut … of fasting to give your digestive system a break, minimize … Eating Enough Fiber: Fiber aids digestive health and helps to create a …
  • Face map your acne to reveal what the position of your blemishes says about YOU

    4 Aug 2015 | 10:12 am
    … in your internal health. FEMAIL spoke to London-based health and wellbeing … problems in your internal health John, who is a … as these negatively influence the digestive system.'  This can … help flush out any digestive imbalances.  CHEEKS When looking …
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Paralyzed men move legs with new non-invasive spinal cord stimulation

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:22 pm
    Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. This expands to nine the number of completely paralyzed individuals who have achieved voluntary movement while receiving spinal stimulation.
  • New therapy delivers long-term relief for chronic back, leg pain, study finds

    28 Jul 2015 | 8:07 am
    Patients who received a novel high frequency form of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy experienced significantly greater, long-term relief for both chronic back and leg pain, when compared to a traditional low frequency form of SCS therapy, investigators report in a new article.
  • Less is more when treating rare eye condition

    28 Jul 2015 | 7:12 am
    New research is showing that less is more when it comes to the treatment of optic disc pits -- a rare eye condition. Many of the surgical techniques commonly used are unnecessary, a researcher now says.
  • Spines of boys, girls differ at birth

    24 Jul 2015 | 1:06 pm
    Looking at measurements of the vertebrae -- the series of small bones that make up the spinal column -- in newborn children, investigators found that differences between the sexes are present at birth.
  • Patient satisfaction is good indicator of success after spinal surgery

    24 Jul 2015 | 5:48 am
    Patient satisfaction ratings after surgery for spinal degenerative disease--especially in terms of reduced pain and disability--are a good indicator of the procedure's effectiveness, reports a new study.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Gout medications might be useful in treating alcohol-induced liver disease

    31 Jul 2015 | 3:26 pm
    Two commonly used gout medications, which target uric acid and adenosine triphosphate, may offer protection from alcohol-induced liver disease and inflammation, new research suggests. These findings suggest that clinical trials in humans with alcoholic liver disease should be considered.
  • How to become a T follicular helper cell

    30 Jul 2015 | 7:00 pm
    Follicular helper Tcells (TFH cells), a rare type of immune cell that is essential for inducing a strong and lasting antibody response to viruses and other microbes, have garnered intense interest in recent years but the molecular signals that drive their differentiation had remained unclear. Now, a team of researchers has identified a pair of master regulators that control the fate of TFH cells.
  • HVTN 505 vaccine induced antibodies nonspecific for HIV

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:24 pm
    A new study helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome.
  • Waking up HIV

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:22 pm
    Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has helped millions survive the human immunodeficiency virus. Unfortunately, HIV has a built-in survival mechanism, creating reservoirs of latent, inactive virus that are invisible to both HAART and the immune system. But now, researchers have identified a compound that activates latent HIV, offering the tantalizing possibility that the virus can be flushed out of the silent reservoirs and fully cured.
  • Liver plays role in pneumonia, sepsis susceptibility

    30 Jul 2015 | 9:08 am
    New evidence highlights the importance of the liver in immunity against bacterial pneumonia. The study is the first of its kind to directly show such a link between liver-produced molecules and pneumonia susceptibility during sepsis.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Understanding molecular mechanism leading to addiction in humans

    4 Aug 2015 | 6:37 am
    A new study opens the field to new understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying addiction in humans. The team found that humans with mutation of a key gene for this co-transmission were 10 times more vulnerable to very severe forms of addiction.
  • Missing piece surfaces in the puzzle of autism

    4 Aug 2015 | 4:40 am
    A new gene that plays a crucial role during early development in humans and whose under-expression may induce certain autistic traits has been uncovered by scientists. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which affect 7.6 million people is a major challenge. Characterized by heterogeneous symptoms and a multifactorial origin, this complex condition evolves during brain development. The scientists thus chose to study adult olfactory stem cells as indicators of the early stages of ontogenesis in order to determine new genes involved in this disease.
  • Brain teaser: 3-D printed 'tissue' to help combat disease

    3 Aug 2015 | 7:30 am
    A bench-top brain that accurately reflects actual brain tissue would be significant for researching not only the effect of drugs, but brain disorders like schizophrenia, and degenerative brain disease. Researchers have now completed 3-D printing a six-layered structure similar to brain tissue, in which cells are accurately placed and remain in their designated layer.
  • Brain-controlled prosthesis nearly as good as one-finger typing

    31 Jul 2015 | 7:37 am
    Brain-controlled prostheses sample a few hundred neurons to estimate motor commands that involve millions of neurons. Sampling errors can reduce the precision and speed of thought-controlled keypads. A new technique can analyze this sample and make dozens of corrective adjustments in the blink of an eye to make thought-controlled cursors more precise.
  • The body and the brain: Impact of mental, physical exertion on fatigue development

    30 Jul 2015 | 1:24 pm
    Do you ever notice how stress and mental frustration can affect your physical abilities? When you are worried about something at work, do you find yourself more exhausted at the end of the day? This phenomenon is a result of the activation of a specific area of the brain when we attempt to participate in both physical and mental tasks simultaneously.
Log in