Anatomy

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  • Sport in old age can stimulate brain fitness, but effect decreases with advancing age

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    Physical exercise in old age can improve brain perfusion as well as certain memory skills, say neuroscientists who studied men and women aged between 60 and 77. In younger individuals regular training on a treadmill tended to improve cerebral blood flow and visual memory. However, trial participants who were older than 70 years of age tended to show no benefit of exercise.
  • Paralyzed patients have weaker bones, higher risk of fractures than expected

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    22 Oct 2014 | 1:39 pm
    People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.
  • The Stunning Diversity of Human Faces

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    nathanlents
    1 Oct 2014 | 9:08 am
     Summary The shape and structure of the human face varies much more among individuals than do the faces of other species, even compared to species that have far more genetic diversity. The shapes of human faces vary more in the population than does any other physical feature. This high degree of facial diversity, which cuts across all racial groups, argues that human evolution has explicitly favored wide variance in human face shapes. Humans are a highly social species with remarkable skills in facial recognition, which develop very early in childhood. Therefore, the evolution of highly…
  • STEM STUFF - Anatomy in Clay workshop series!

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    BCLD
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:13 am
    We are really excited to share a brand new series of workshops with you! The Berthoud Community Library is launching a free, hand-on Anatomy in Clay workshop series for families! Drop in for Monday session, from 3:30pm to 4:30pm, October 6 through November 10. During these free, fun and interactive sessions, kids and adults will use clay to for human anatomy through a unique hands-on approach; the Anatomy in Clay Learning System.  They will form muscles, tendons, nerves and body systems on scale models of human hands, feet and whole body skeletons. The sessions will be held in our community…
  • Experimenting with machine stitch.

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    lucyjessica
    5 Oct 2014 | 11:04 pm
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    Anatomy News

  • Australian in Trat under watch for Ebola

    25 Oct 2014 | 10:41 am
    … was sent to a local hospital on October 15, he said … to the Department of Medical Science and Chulalongkorn Hospital. The result was expected … at the ministry's hospital and looked after as per … would be sent for an autopsy only if the test for …
  • Swiss scientist wins U.S. award for cancer research

    24 Oct 2014 | 9:47 pm
    … 39;s pioneering research in probing the molecular anatomy of tumor cells … synergy between pharmaceutical companies, universities, and research hospitals changed both the way we … prevention, detection and treatment. Chinese scientists Wang Zhenyi and Chen Zhu …
  • More Ferguson autopsy details: Michael Brown's arms weren't up (with PDF)

    24 Oct 2014 | 9:34 pm
    … national controversy. The St. Louis medical examiner, Dr. Michael Graham, who … the official investigation, reviewed the autopsy report for the newspaper. He … , performed by a St. Louis University laboratory, revealed tetrahydrocannabinol, THC for …
  • A Senior Moment: What's new with Alzheimer's Disease research?

    24 Oct 2014 | 5:52 pm
    … of research at Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, Stanford University School of Medicine … tau in the brain at autopsy. Most practitioners still make a … research had to be stopped prematurely because 6 percent of the research …
  • Vonderrit Myers’ family releases autopsy, lawyers say findings conflict with police reports

    24 Oct 2014 | 3:46 pm
    … head, according to a private autopsy report. Myers’ family hired pathologist … with the police department’s medical examiner Dr. Michael Graham, who … his DNA,” Wooten said. The medical examiner’s full report won …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Designer 'barrel' proteins created

    23 Oct 2014 | 11:23 am
    Designer proteins that expand on nature's own repertoire, created by a team of chemists and biochemists, are described in a new paper. Proteins are long linear molecules that fold up to form well-defined 3D shapes. These 3D molecular architectures are essential for biological functions such as the elasticity of skin, the digestion of food, and the transport of oxygen in blood.
  • Meiosis: Cutting the ties that bind

    23 Oct 2014 | 11:20 am
    The development of a new organism from the joining of two single cells is a carefully orchestrated endeavor. But even before sperm meets egg, an equally elaborate set of choreographed steps must occur to ensure successful sexual reproduction. Those steps, known as reproductive cell division or meiosis, split the original number of chromosomes in half so that offspring will inherit half their genetic material from one parent and half from the other.
  • Cancer exosome 'micro factories' aid in cancer progression

    23 Oct 2014 | 10:17 am
    Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer, scientists have discovered.
  • YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer

    23 Oct 2014 | 10:17 am
    Federal Express and UPS are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. There exists in cancer biology an impressive packaging and delivery system that influences whether your body will develop cancer or not, scientists say. Researchers have announced findings indicating a possible new way of manipulating chromatin and its histones through a protein reader known as the YEATS domain protein, providing new hope for cancer treatment.
  • Paper-based synthetic gene networks could enable rapid detection of ebola and other viruses

    23 Oct 2014 | 10:16 am
    Synthetic gene networks hold great potential for broad biotechnology and medical applications, but so far they have been limited to the lab. A study reveals a new method for using engineered gene circuits beyond the lab, allowing researchers to safely activate the cell-free, paper-based system by simply adding water. The low-cost, easy-to-use platform could enable the rapid detection of different strains of deadly viruses such as Ebola.
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    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • Experimenting with machine stitch.

    lucyjessica
    5 Oct 2014 | 11:04 pm
  • The Bone Ages: MOSI on Down to the Manchester Science Festival, Sunday 2nd Nov 2014

    These Bones Of Mine
    3 Oct 2014 | 6:51 am
    A date for the diary for all bone and science lovers!  Skeletal researchers from the University of Sheffield and Manchester Metropolitan University will be at the Manchester Museum of Science & Industry (MOSI) on Sunday 2nd of November 2014 (from 10.30 am to 4 pm) helping to present an event called The Bone Ages to the public.  The Bone Ages will bring together the social sciences and lab based research in helping to present the wonders of studying the human skeleton, detailing how bones can teach us about the history, health and society of past populations and individuals using live…
  • STEM STUFF - Anatomy in Clay workshop series!

    BCLD
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:13 am
    We are really excited to share a brand new series of workshops with you! The Berthoud Community Library is launching a free, hand-on Anatomy in Clay workshop series for families! Drop in for Monday session, from 3:30pm to 4:30pm, October 6 through November 10. During these free, fun and interactive sessions, kids and adults will use clay to for human anatomy through a unique hands-on approach; the Anatomy in Clay Learning System.  They will form muscles, tendons, nerves and body systems on scale models of human hands, feet and whole body skeletons. The sessions will be held in our community…
  • The Stunning Diversity of Human Faces

    nathanlents
    1 Oct 2014 | 9:08 am
     Summary The shape and structure of the human face varies much more among individuals than do the faces of other species, even compared to species that have far more genetic diversity. The shapes of human faces vary more in the population than does any other physical feature. This high degree of facial diversity, which cuts across all racial groups, argues that human evolution has explicitly favored wide variance in human face shapes. Humans are a highly social species with remarkable skills in facial recognition, which develop very early in childhood. Therefore, the evolution of highly…
  • EXCELLENT HISTOLOGY "Virtual Microscope" WEBSITE; Just click the "Slide Box" Link on the Left Side of the Screen (Thank you: Alexis Byrem)

    MyAnatomyMentor
    28 Sep 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Alveoli in the lungs Non-keratinized Stratified Squamous ET Connective Tissue Simple Columnar ET of the Digestive Tract (Small Intestine) Bronchial Tree Changes “VIRTUAL HISTOLOGY LABORATORY” by R. Sorensen
 
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Top medicine articles for October 2014

    24 Oct 2014 | 5:47 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Hand-grip strength is an amazingly good predictor of future rates of mortality and morbidity, or sickness http://buff.ly/1BK759H -- Hand grip strength should be considered as a vital sign useful for screening middle-aged and older adults http://buff.ly/1DglFaI -- Measuring hand-grip strength is very simple and cheap. Every primary care doctor should have a dynamometer in their office. At every visit, the doctor could check grip strength for older patients. If someone was in the 45th percentile for their age and the…
  • Multi-dose flu shot has only 25 mcg of mercury - most commercial fish contain 23 mcg of mercury per 8 ounces of fish

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:31 am
    Multi-dose flu shot has only 25 mcg of mercury - most commercial fish contain 23 mcg of mercury per 8 ounces of fish http://buff.ly/11CTRPwAre multi-dose vials less expensive?Economics are a bit complicated due to wastage with multiple vials:Single versus multi-dose vaccine vials: an economic computational modelhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20566395Most of the Western world, apart from the US, has moved on to single vials:http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/733986Whenever possible, CDC recommends that single-use vials be used and that multi-dose vials of medication be assigned to a…
  • How to Pick the Right Bedtime - select a wake up time, count back 7 hours and add 10 minutes to fall asleep

    20 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Given the importance of a good night's sleep, how do you pick the best possible bedtime? WSJ's Heidi Mitchell and Stanford University's Dr. Rafael Pelayo discuss with Tanya Rivero.Related:What Makes A Great Bedtime? | Craig Canapari, MD http://bit.ly/1vstZzJShift workers and people who get jet lag may gain weight because they dusturb their "inside garden" (gut microbes) buff.ly/1vzaXci Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • The top 50 science stars of Twitter according to AAAS/Science. What does it mean?

    16 Oct 2014 | 8:42 pm
    It's nice to be on the list of The top 50 science stars of Twitter according to AAAS/Science. However, the list is based on somewhat arbitrary criteria and is meant to provoke discussion rather than to be taken seriously. What is valuable, however, are some of the quotes by scientists interviewed for the story. A selection of the quotes is posted below. The skeptic view on TwitterFact of life: Most high-performing scientists have not embraced Twitter. Why? "Highest ranking chemist considers Twitter a waste of time that he’d much prefer spending on reading, writing papers".Twitter proponents…
  • 65-yo patient received a standard-dose flu shot already this season. Should she get the high-dose shot too? Or get a second regular flu shot?

    15 Oct 2014 | 5:34 am
    A 65-yo female patient received a standard-dose flu shot already this season. Should he get the high-dose shot too? Or try to get a second regular flu shot?The simple answer is no. The patients should consider herself immunized. Studies show that getting a delayed second dose doesn't necessarily increase antibody response, and there's some concern that it might actually have a negative effect on the immunity. If you've already had the regular seasonal dose, wait until next year for another dose.Image of the H1N1 Influenza Virus, CDC.From CDC's Immunize.org website:Sometimes patients age 65…
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Corrigendum

    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
  • Impact of increased hematocrit on right ventricular afterload in response to chronic hypoxia

    Schreier, D. A., Hacker, T. A., Hunter, K., Eickoff, J., Liu, A., Song, G., Chesler, N.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Chronic hypoxia causes chronic mountain sickness through hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) and increased hematocrit. Here, we investigated the impact of increased hematocrit and HPH on right ventricular (RV) afterload via pulmonary vascular impedance. Mice were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen) for 10 (10H) or 21 days (21H). After baseline hemodynamic measurements, ~500 μl of blood were extracted and replaced with an equal volume of hydroxyethylstarch to normalize hematocrit and all hemodynamic measurements were repeated. In addition, ~500 μl of blood were…
  • Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure

    Cour, M., Abrial, M., Jahandiez, V., Loufouat, J., Belaidi, E., Gharib, A., Varennes, A., Monneret, G., Thibault, H., Ovize, M., Argaud, L.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA…
  • Systemic stiffening of mouse tail tendon is related to dietary advanced glycation end products but not high-fat diet or cholesterol

    Eriksen, C., Svensson, R. B., Scheijen, J., Hag, A. M. F., Schalkwijk, C., Praet, S. F. E., Schjerling, P., Kjaer, M., Magnusson, S. P., Couppe, C.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Tendon pathology is related to metabolic disease and mechanical overloading, but the effect of metabolic disease on tendon mechanics is unknown. This study investigated the effect of diet and apolipoprotein E deficiency (ApoE–/–) on mechanical properties and advanced glycation end product (AGE) cross-linking of non-weight-bearing mouse tail tendons. Twenty ApoE–/– male mice were used as a model for hypercholesterolemia along with 26 wild-type (WT) mice. One-half of the mice from each group was fed a normal diet (ND) and the other half was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to…
  • TrkB kinase activity maintains synaptic function and structural integrity at adult neuromuscular junctions

    Mantilla, C. B., Stowe, J. M., Sieck, D. C., Ermilov, L. G., Greising, S. M., Zhang, C., Shokat, K. M., Sieck, G. C.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Activation of the tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) by brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely regulates synaptic transmission at adult neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The role of TrkB kinase activity in the maintenance of NMJ function and structure at diaphragm muscle NMJs was explored using a chemical-genetic approach that permits reversible inactivation of TrkB kinase activity in TrkBF616A mice by 1NMPP1. Inhibiting TrkB kinase activity for 7 days resulted in significant, yet reversible, impairments in neuromuscular transmission at diaphragm NMJs. Neuromuscular transmission…
 
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    Digestive System News

  • What turmeric might do for animal health

    25 Oct 2014 | 10:06 am
    … been studied to promote health. Curcumin is in the … to help keep animals healthy, based on studies showing … digestive tract healthy Help control blood sugar levels Keep skin and eyes healthy … as yet unknown negative health effects. Reference: "Recent …
  • The Kid’s Doctor: Prebiotics and probiotics both aid digestion

    24 Oct 2014 | 10:50 pm
    Lately, I’ve been hearing and reading a lot about the value of prebiotics and probiotics in children’s diets. What, parents wonder, is the difference between the two? Prebiotics are non-digestible nutrients that are found in foods such as legumes, fruits …
  • Dealing with iron deficiency

    24 Oct 2014 | 9:50 pm
    … in the stomach, if there is inflammatory bowel disease, or … the acidity of the stomach, which should improve absorption … on an empty stomach, but it can cause digestive upset. In … natural-route.com. To read more health information, check her website …
  • Teen achiever conquers mystery illness

    24 Oct 2014 | 9:46 pm
    … a mysterious, painful and debilitating health challenge. Practicing on his friend … , despite the best efforts of health specialists running all sorts of … up my immune system, my digestive system, just kind of everything …
  • Gut organisms could be key to unlocking Western diseases

    24 Oct 2014 | 7:34 pm
    … reproduce inside the guts of felines, and … such as inflammatory bowel disease. Professor Mackay … function in our gut to digest fibre and … . Topics: science-and-technology, medical-research, health, the-university-of-sydney-2006, monash-university-3800 First …
 
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • 'Breath test' shows promise for diagnosing fungal pneumonia

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:19 am
    Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit. A novel approach -- analyzing a patient's breath for key chemical compounds made by the infecting microbe -- may help detect invasive aspergillosis, a fungal infection that is a leading cause of mortality in patients with compromised immune systems, according to a proof-of-concept study.
  • Rapid test to diagnose severe sepsis

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:09 am
    A new test could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. The discovery could cut back on the lengthy diagnostic time usually required to confirm if a patient is suffering from sepsis and increase the odds that they will respond to treatment.
  • How lymph nodes expand during disease

    22 Oct 2014 | 10:06 am
    The same specialized immune cells that patrol the body and spot infections also trigger the expansion of immune organs called lymph nodes, scientists have discovered. The immune system defends the body from infections and can also spot and destroy cancer cells. Lymph nodes are at the heart of this response, but until now it has never been explained how they expand during disease.
  • Protecting us from our cells: Research could speed trials to treat auto-immune diseases

    22 Oct 2014 | 5:42 am
    Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) boosts the body’s natural defense against this ‘friendly fire’, scientists have found. The findings are especially exciting because IGF-1 is already approved for use in patients, which could speed up the move to clinical trials for treating auto-immune diseases.
  • Does exercise slows the onset of type 1 diabetes in children, adults?

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:07 pm
    Rates of type 1 diabetes -- the autoimmune form of the condition that often begins in childhood and eventually results in lifelong dependency on insulin -- are increasing in almost all nations worldwide. However, while it appears possible from research in other forms of diabetes that physical exercise could slow the progression of this disease, there have been no studies to date that explore this in patients with type 1 diabetes.
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:20 am
    For people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory -- the ability to recall memories of events -- researchers report.
  • Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

    22 Oct 2014 | 9:30 am
    Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington’s disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, report researchers.
  • Clot dissolver tpa's tardy twin could aid in stroke recovery

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:07 pm
    uPA appears to help brain cells recover from the injuries induced by loss of blood flow. Treating mice with uPA after an experimental stroke can improve their recovery of motor function, researchers have found.
  • Sport in old age can stimulate brain fitness, but effect decreases with advancing age

    20 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    Physical exercise in old age can improve brain perfusion as well as certain memory skills, say neuroscientists who studied men and women aged between 60 and 77. In younger individuals regular training on a treadmill tended to improve cerebral blood flow and visual memory. However, trial participants who were older than 70 years of age tended to show no benefit of exercise.
  • Why your brain makes you reach for junk food

    20 Oct 2014 | 8:12 am
    Will that be a pizza for you or will you go for a salad? Choosing what you eat is not simply a matter of taste, conclude scientists in a new study. As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, your brain is making decisions based more on a food's caloric content.
 
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