Anatomy

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  • Changes in eye can predict changes in brain

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    25 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    A loss of cells in the retina is one of the earliest signs of frontotemporal dementia in people with a genetic risk for the disorder -- even before any changes appear in their behavior -- scientists have found. Although it is located in the eye, the retina is made up of neurons with direct connections to the brain. This means that studying the retina is one of the easiest and most accessible ways to examine and track changes in neurons.
  • Organ grown in animal from cells created in lab

    Immune System / Vaccines News From Medical News Today
    27 Aug 2014 | 1:00 am
    Laboratory-grown replacement organs have moved a step closer with the completion of a new study.
  • Protecting brains of very preterm infants

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:55 pm
    Premature babies are far more at risk than infants born at term of developing brain damage resulting in neurodevelopmental delay that may persist throughout their lives. A team of specialists in infant brain imaging has demonstrated that administering three doses of erythropoietin may help.
  • Cancer leaves common fingerprint on DNA

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    26 Aug 2014 | 6:10 am
    Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes in a broad variety of cancers to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA, which help govern whether genes are turned 'on' or 'off.'
  • Worst Life Advice: Positive Thinking

    WordPress Tag: Physiology
    tnsgingerale
    8 Aug 2014 | 10:37 am
    The personality presented as not sincere, but desired. If I convince myself the joy is real it will eventually flourish into reality, right? That’s how it works? They call it ‘The Power of Positivity.’ Stay positive and things will eventually look up. Fast-forward a year later. It’s August 2014 and now I feel fake. I’ve walked around with “positivity” on my face and expressed such “feelings” with convincing words. The amount of times I lie after some asks “How are you?” are rounded down to a number I can’t possibly count to. I lie to my family and friends about…
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    Anatomy News

  • Longer Looks: A New Kind Of Abortion War; Foster Kids And Psychotropic Drugs

    28 Aug 2014 | 4:27 pm
    … dimensions of American society—legal, medical, scientific, theological, political, philosophical, biological, ethical … , then schizoaffective disorder — and his medications were in constant flux. Things … Time of Grey's Anatomy A 2005 survey by the …
  • Cardelle named dean of college of health sciences at ESU

    28 Aug 2014 | 3:53 pm
    … partnerships with Temple University; an international health sciences affiliation with the Universidad … of intra-professional courses in human anatomy and health and wellness … job preparation, partnerships for faculty research and improvements to the quality …
  • Autopsy Says Drugs Killed Inmate in Botched Execution

    28 Aug 2014 | 2:42 pm
    An autopsy on a inmate who died … Oklahoma death-row prisoners, said the autopsy report leaves the big question … ; He faulted the medical examiner for not dissecting Lockett's femoral …
  • Clayton Lockett didn't die of heart attack, Oklahoma official autopsy shows

    28 Aug 2014 | 2:30 pm
    The official autopsy report into the death of … the gurney. An earlier independent autopsy carried out on Lockett’s … autopsy released Tuesday, carried out by the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences …
  • Clayton Lockett autopsy released

    28 Aug 2014 | 2:22 pm
    The official autopsy report into the death of … the gurney. An earlier independent autopsy carried out on Lockett’s … autopsy released Tuesday, carried out by the Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Encyclopedia of how genomes function gets much bigger

    27 Aug 2014 | 12:17 pm
    A big step in understanding the mysteries of the human genome has been unveiled in the form of three analyses that provide the most detailed comparison yet of how the genomes of the fruit fly, roundworm, and human function. The analyses will likely offer insights into how the information in the human genome regulates development, and how it is responsible for diseases.
  • NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing

    27 Aug 2014 | 10:17 am
    The National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing policy to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants.
  • Statistical Approach for Calculating Environmental Influences in Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Results

    27 Aug 2014 | 8:18 am
    A statistical model allows researchers to remove false positive findings that plague modern research when many dozens of factors and their interactions are suggested to play a role in causing complex diseases.
  • Why Listeria bacterium is so hard to fight

    27 Aug 2014 | 7:02 am
    The harmful and potentially deadly bacterium Listeria is extremely good at adapting to changes. Now research uncovers exactly how cunning Listeria is and why it is so hard to fight. The discovery can help develop more efficient ways to combat the bacteria.
  • Cancer leaves common fingerprint on DNA

    26 Aug 2014 | 6:10 am
    Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes in a broad variety of cancers to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA, which help govern whether genes are turned 'on' or 'off.'
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    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • Anatomy of Man

    acosori
    28 Aug 2014 | 8:31 am
    Anatomy of Man
  • Mahendra Trivedi and Human Physiology and Anatomy

    kranthip4546
    28 Aug 2014 | 8:09 am
    Human Physiology is the study of the function of structures within an organism. One who studies physiology is keen to know how the organs function and how they make the organism function. For instance, the person may analyze how the heart functions as a pump and how the circulatory system works with the heart to distribute blood throughout the body. The student may also examine how the lungs function with the circulatory system to exchange waste and oxygen. Human Anatomy is the study of the structures of an organism, like those of the human body. An individual who studies anatomy is…
  • Bone Quiz 13

    JB
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:24 pm
    Today is a great Friday. Not only is it a tolerable 31˚C here in Jaén, but the new materials I
  • Location of the Mind Remains a Mystery

    Prof. Olsen
    22 Aug 2014 | 12:02 am
    Where does the mind reside? It’s a question that has occupied the best brains for thousands of
  • AMY 2A: FALL 2014 COURSE SYLLABUS/ TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

    MyAnatomyMentor
    18 Aug 2014 | 4:35 am
    AMY 2A Course Syllabus FALL 2014
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • losing my vir'gym'ity, 9th August 2014

    meonomous
    9 Aug 2014 | 12:30 am
    yesterday I lost my virgymity!………. no, not a misspelling, I made it up, vir’gym’ity……. my first proper gym session ever……. yes, I’ve been IN gyms before but never actually done anything useful in them other than stare blankly at the equipment and wonder what they all do….. I mean I’ve probably got to first base with them, like as far as getting through the door but nothing more, let’s say, hands on………. even had the guidance of a personal trainer!……. yes, me…….. what is the…
  • Immune imbalance - Maternal Immune Activation - Schizophrenia

    researchinitiative
    8 Aug 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Cytokine pathway disruption in a mouse model of schizophrenia induced by Munc18-1a overexpression in the brain http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/11/1/128/abstract Background An accumulating body of evidence points to the significance of neuroinflammation and immunogenetics in schizophrenia, and an imbalance of cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) has been suggested to be associated with the disorder. Munc18-overexpressing mice (Munc18-OE) have provided a model for the study of the alterations that may underlie the symptoms of subjects with schizophrenia. The aim of the…
  • Chronic Stress, Adverse Maternal and Newborn Outcomes - Over Generations

    researchinitiative
    8 Aug 2014 | 4:20 pm
    Ancestral exposure to stress epigenetically programs preterm birth risk and adverse maternal and newborn outcomes http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/121 Full Paper at Link Abstract Background Chronic stress is considered to be one of many causes of human preterm birth (PTB), but no direct evidence has yet been provided. Here we show in rats that stress across generations has downstream effects on endocrine, metabolic and behavioural manifestations of PTB possibly via microRNA (miRNA) regulation. Methods Pregnant dams of the parental generation were exposed to stress from gestational…
  • Worst Life Advice: Positive Thinking

    tnsgingerale
    8 Aug 2014 | 10:37 am
    The personality presented as not sincere, but desired. If I convince myself the joy is real it will eventually flourish into reality, right? That’s how it works? They call it ‘The Power of Positivity.’ Stay positive and things will eventually look up. Fast-forward a year later. It’s August 2014 and now I feel fake. I’ve walked around with “positivity” on my face and expressed such “feelings” with convincing words. The amount of times I lie after some asks “How are you?” are rounded down to a number I can’t possibly count to. I lie to my family and friends about…
  • Total Diet Approach to Healthy Eating

    wedishnutrition
    8 Aug 2014 | 10:15 am
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Schistosomiasis (bilharzia) - 2014 Lancet review

    7 Aug 2014 | 6:30 am
    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Schistosomiasis: Ending the Anguish of a Silent Disease - The Carter Center video.Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily. The eggs must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce an immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes:Systemic effects-…
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) - DocMikeEvans animation video

    30 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dr. Mike Evans is founder of the Health Design Lab at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, an Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of Toronto, and a staff physician at St. Michael's Hospital.Written and Narrated by Dr. Mike Evans. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • National Library of Medicine, world's largest medical library, was a shelf of books in Surgeon General office in 1818

    29 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world, started in 1818 as a shelf of books the office of the Surgeon General The National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world, began in 1818 as the US Army Medical Library, in Washington, DC, essentially a shelf of books in the office of Joseph Lovell, then Surgeon General and the head of the Army Medical Department. By the time of the Civil War the book collection consisted of about 2000 volumes and, no longer fitting in the office, was moved to a bank building.The library, then as now, was constantly…
  • Top medicine articles for July 2014

    23 Jul 2014 | 7:38 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Migraines Linked to Increased Risk of 'Silent Strokes' http://buff.ly/1hTE5RuDoctor’s Salaries Are Not the Big Cost - NYTimes http://buff.ly/QWe2lx -- "There is a startling secret behind America’s health care hierarchy: Physicians, the most highly trained members in the industry’s work force, are on average right in the middle of the compensation pack. That is because the biggest bucks are currently earned not through the delivery of care, but from overseeing the business of medicine.The base pay of insurance…
  • Pancreatic Cancer - 2014 update from Am Fam Physician

    22 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Risk factors include:- family history- smoking- chronic pancreatitis- obesity- diabetes mellitus- heavy alcohol use- possible dietary factorsSymptomsBecause more than two-thirds of adenocarcinomas occur in the head of the pancreas, abdominal pain, jaundice, pruritus, dark urine, and acholic stools may be presenting symptoms. DiagnosisIn symptomatic patients, the serum tumor marker cancer antigen 19-9 can be used to confirm the diagnosis and to predict prognosis and recurrence after resection.
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Effects of elevated oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on respiratory function and cognitive performance

    Gill, M., Natoli, M. J., Vacchiano, C., MacLeod, D. B., Ikeda, K., Qin, M., Pollock, N. W., Moon, R. E., Pieper, C., Vann, R. D.
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    Hyperoxia during diving has been suggested to exacerbate hypercapnic narcosis and promote unconsciousness. We tested this hypothesis in male volunteers (12 at rest, 10 at 75 W cycle ergometer exercise) breathing each of four gases in a hyperbaric chamber. Inspired Po2 (PiO2) was 0.21 and 1.3 atmospheres (atm) without or with an individual subject's maximum tolerable inspired CO2 (PiO2 = 0.055–0.085 atm). Measurements included end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PetCO2), rating of perceived discomfort (RPD), expired minute ventilation (Ve), and cognitive function assessed by auditory n-back…
  • Effects of airway tree asymmetry on the emergence and spatial persistence of ventilation defects

    Leary, D., Winkler, T., Braune, A., Maksym, G. N.
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    Asymmetry and heterogeneity in the branching of the human bronchial tree are well documented, but their effects on bronchoconstriction and ventilation distribution in asthma are unclear. In a series of seminal studies, Venegas et al. have shown that bronchoconstriction may lead to self-organized patterns of patchy ventilation in a computational model that could explain areas of poor ventilation [ventilation defects (VDefs)] observed in positron emission tomography images during induced bronchoconstriction. To investigate effects of anatomic asymmetry on the emergence of VDefs we used the…
  • Role of VPAC2 receptor in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    Koga, M., Mizuno, Y., Watanabe, I., Kawakami, H., Goto, T.
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) have pulmonary vasodilatory and positive inotropic effects via receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2, which possess a similar affinity for both peptides, and PAC1, a PACAP-preferring receptor. VIP is a promising option for PH treatment; however, various physiological effects of VIP have limited its clinical use. We investigated the effects of VPAC1 and VPAC2 selective agonists VIP and PACAP to explore more appropriate means of…
  • Intrinsic stiffness of extracellular matrix increases with age in skeletal muscles of mice

    Wood, L. K., Kayupov, E., Gumucio, J. P., Mendias, C. L., Claflin, D. R., Brooks, S. V.
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    Advanced age is associated with increases in muscle passive stiffness, but the contributors to the changes remain unclear. Our purpose was to determine the relative contributions of muscle fibers and extracellular matrix (ECM) to muscle passive stiffness in both adult and old animals. Passive mechanical properties were determined for isolated individual muscle fibers and bundles of muscle fibers that included their associated ECM, obtained from tibialis anterior muscles of adult (8–12 mo old) and old (28–30 mo old) mice. Maximum tangent moduli of individual muscle fibers from…
  • Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors

    Green, D. J., Eijsvogels, T., Bouts, Y. M., Maiorana, A. J., Naylor, L. H., Scholten, R. R., Spaanderman, M. E. A., Pugh, C. J. A., Sprung, V. S., Schreuder, T., Jones, H., Cable, T., Hopman, M. T. E., Thijssen, D. H. J.
    15 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function.
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    MedPage Today Cardiovascular

  • Work Smarter, Not Harder: The FOAMed Report

    28 Aug 2014 | 1:00 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- A regular update of emergency department must-reads from Free Open Access Meducation (FOAMed). Here are five recent items.
  • Stroke Rounds: APOE Tied to Warfarin Brain Bleeds (CME/CE)

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:54 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Apolipoprotein E gene variants epsilon-2 and epsilon-4 were strong risk factors for warfarin-induced intracerebral hemorrhage independent of the drug's anticoagulant effect.
  • ESC: Will There Really Be a PARADIGM Shift?

    28 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    BARCELONA (MedPage Today) -- A heart failure drug that may reduce hospitalization and death rates dominates the buzz leading up to the European Society of Cardiology meeting, which opens here on Saturday.
  • Results Mixed With Home BP Monitoring (CME/CE)

    27 Aug 2014 | 8:30 am
    (MedPage Today) -- A hypertension self-management program reduced systolic blood pressure in high-risk patients, including those with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease, according to British researchers.
  • Study Flags ECG Change as CVD Risk (CME/CE)

    27 Aug 2014 | 7:30 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Assessing electrocardiographic change could improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment in the elderly, according to a Danish study.
 
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    Digestive System News

  • Research reveals probiotics are good for healthier skin

    28 Aug 2014 | 5:28 pm
    … "healthy" bacteria that have been linked to a healthy digestive … t just good for your gut - new, compelling research … 39;s a prescription for healthy skin that a growing … digestion, creating an overgrowth of "unhealthy" bacteria in the gut …
  • Unhealthy Gut

    28 Aug 2014 | 1:50 pm
    … gut maybe unhealthy: 1. Anxiety 2. Food allergies or sensitivities 3. Digestive … happening in your stomach. If your gut is unhealthy it … going on with your gut health. Research suggests depression is … .com) To optimize your gut bacteria nutritionists advise to …
  • Digestive Remedies in Japan - New Market Report

    28 Aug 2014 | 10:28 am
    … -- Retail value sales of digestive remedies declined by 1% in … primary consumers of digestive remedies. Nevertheless, digestive remedies marketed for stomach aches caused … us at 800-844-8156 Browse all Healthcare research reports at Fast Market …
  • 8 Things Anyone With Stomach Issues Should Know About

    28 Aug 2014 | 10:09 am
    … digestion is one of the most effective ways to improve health … is a good indication the digestive system is ready to … the longer it takes to digest. Separating starchy carbohydrates (bread, … passes directly into the stomach. In the stomach, the bolus is “ …
  • Cardiac Sonographer Donna Hendershot to be Featured on Close-Up Talk Radio

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:51 am
    TURLOCK, CALIFORNIA, USA, August 28, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Turlock, CA – Every cell in the heart has the ability to initiate an impulse. Donna Hendershot began her life living in a railroad box car with no running water or plumbing. Growing up, she …
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    Gallbladder News

  • Cardiac Sonographer Donna Hendershot to be Featured on Close-Up Talk Radio

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:51 am
    TURLOCK, CALIFORNIA, USA, August 28, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Turlock, CA – Every cell in the heart has the ability to initiate an impulse. Donna Hendershot began her life living in a railroad box car with no running water or plumbing. Growing up, she …
  • C-COM ANTENNAS DEPLOYED IN JAPAN LANDSLIDE DISASTER

    28 Aug 2014 | 7:24 am
    OTTAWA, ONTARIO, CANADA, August 26, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- C-COM Satellite Systems Inc. (TSXV: CMI), a leading global provider of mobile auto-deploying satellite antenna systems, announced today that a number of its iNetVu® systems have recently been …
  • Angiocrine Bioscience Licenses New Stem Cell Technology

    27 Aug 2014 | 10:42 am
    Advances in Cell Based Assays, 11th & 12th November 2014, London UK LONDON, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM, August 27, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Angiocrine Bioscience announced in a press release last week that it has licensed the rights to a new technology …
  • Ask the Doctor: Gallbladder Surgery

    27 Aug 2014 | 9:45 am
    … Wake Up Montana to discuss gallbladder surgery. Dr. Riha Gordon, a … Wake Up Montana to discuss gallbladder surgery. Updated: Wednesday, August 20 …
  • Gallbladder Disease Misdiagnosis Lawsuit Settled by VA

    27 Aug 2014 | 8:33 am
    … to a failure to diagnose gallbladder cancer and other substandard care … Lee Stapleton, 68, died from gallbladder cancer on June 2, following … doctors decided to remove his gallbladder and parts of his liver …
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Lifetime of fitness: Fountain of youth for bone, joint health?

    27 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging. "An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates that we can modulate age-related decline in the musculoskeletal system," said the lead study author.. "A lot of the deterioration we see with aging can be attributed to a more sedentary lifestyle instead of aging itself."
  • Attacking a rare disease at its source with gene therapy

    26 Aug 2014 | 5:53 pm
    The two main treatments for MPS I are bone marrow transplantation and intravenous enzyme replacement therapy, but these are only marginally effective or clinically impractical, especially when the disease strikes the central nervous system. Using an animal model, a team has proven the efficacy of a more elegant way to restore aberrant protein levels in the body through direct gene transfer.
  • Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

    26 Aug 2014 | 11:25 am
    Each year, more than 300,000 Americans, primarily adults over age 65, sustain a hip fracture, a debilitating injury that can diminish life quality and expectancy. A new study found that average lifetime societal benefits in the U.S. reduced the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 per patient (in 2009 dollars), and that total, lifetime societal savings exceeded $16 billion for older patients.
  • Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

    21 Aug 2014 | 10:26 am
    Researchers have examined racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Findings included small but significant differences in self-care and mobility at discharge.
  • Engineering bone growth: Coated tissue scaffolds help body grow new bone to repair injuries or congenital defects

    19 Aug 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Chemical engineers have devised a new implantable tissue scaffold coated with bone growth factors that are released slowly over a few weeks. When applied to bone injuries or defects, this coated scaffold induces the body to rapidly form new bone that looks and behaves just like the original tissue. This type of coated scaffold could offer a dramatic improvement over the current standard for treating bone injuries, which involves transplanting bone from another part of the patient's body -- a painful process that does not always supply enough bone.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Malaria symptoms fade on repeat infections due to loss of immune cells

    27 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    Children who repeatedly become infected with malaria often experience no clinical symptoms with these subsequent infections, and a team of scientists has discovered that this might be due at least in part to a depletion of specific types of immune cells. Additionally, researchers speculate that malaria infection, by reshaping immune responses, might influence susceptibility to, and protection from, other infectious diseases.
  • Common anemia: Drug represents first potential treatment

    27 Aug 2014 | 8:19 am
    An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment. Anemia is a condition that occurs when red blood cells are in short supply or do not function properly. When an individual has anemia, the body does not get enough oxygen, since there are fewer red blood cells to carry the iron-rich protein hemoglobin that helps distribute oxygen throughout the body.
  • Why Listeria bacterium is so hard to fight

    27 Aug 2014 | 7:02 am
    The harmful and potentially deadly bacterium Listeria is extremely good at adapting to changes. Now research uncovers exactly how cunning Listeria is and why it is so hard to fight. The discovery can help develop more efficient ways to combat the bacteria.
  • HIV antibodies block infection by reservoir-derived virus in laboratory study

    26 Aug 2014 | 6:01 pm
    A laboratory study lends further weight to the potential effectiveness of passive immunotherapy to suppress HIV in the absence of drug treatment. Passive immunotherapy for HIV is an experimental strategy that involves periodically administering broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies (bNAbs) to control the virus.
  • Alcoholics have an abnormal CD8 T cell response to the influenza virus

    26 Aug 2014 | 5:55 pm
    Chronic drinking is associated with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. A reduced CD8 T cell response was previously implicated in increased disease severity due to influenza virus infections. New rodent findings indicate that only some CD8 T cell functions are damaged while others remain intact.
 
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Neuroscientists reverse memories' emotional associations: Brain circuit that links feelings to memories manipulated

    27 Aug 2014 | 10:16 am
    Most memories have some kind of emotion associated with them: Recalling the week you just spent at the beach probably makes you feel happy, while reflecting on being bullied provokes more negative feelings. A new study from neuroscientists reveals the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions.
  • Protecting brains of very preterm infants

    26 Aug 2014 | 5:55 pm
    Premature babies are far more at risk than infants born at term of developing brain damage resulting in neurodevelopmental delay that may persist throughout their lives. A team of specialists in infant brain imaging has demonstrated that administering three doses of erythropoietin may help.
  • Lack of naturally occuring protein linked to dementia

    26 Aug 2014 | 8:29 am
    The first evidence that the lack of a naturally occurring protein is linked to early signs of dementia has been provided by researchers. An absence of MK2/3, in spite of the brain cells (neurons) having significant structural abnormalities, did not prevent memories being formed, but did prevent these memories from being altered.
  • Wii Balance Board induces changes in brains of people with multiple sclerosis

    26 Aug 2014 | 6:10 am
    A balance board accessory for a popular video game console can help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce their risk of accidental falls, according to new research. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that use of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board system appears to induce favorable changes in brain connections associated with balance and movement.
  • Changes in eye can predict changes in brain

    25 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    A loss of cells in the retina is one of the earliest signs of frontotemporal dementia in people with a genetic risk for the disorder -- even before any changes appear in their behavior -- scientists have found. Although it is located in the eye, the retina is made up of neurons with direct connections to the brain. This means that studying the retina is one of the easiest and most accessible ways to examine and track changes in neurons.
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