Anatomy

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  • Knuckle-cracking observed using MRI

    Bones / Orthopedics News From Medical News Today
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:00 am
    A cavity forming rapidly inside our finger joints may cause the popping sound heard when cracking knuckles, according to a real-time, MRI based study published April 15, 2015 in the open-access...
  • Electronic micropump to deliver treatments deep within the brain

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    16 Apr 2015 | 10:23 am
    For a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. For this reason, a team of researchers has developed an organic electronic micropump which, when combined with an anti-convulsant drug, enables localized inhibition of epileptic seizure in brain tissue in vitro.
  • Childhood syndrome combining lung disease, arthritis identified

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
    Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis. The hereditary disorder, which appears in early childhood, had never been diagnosed as a single syndrome. The new research revealed that it is caused by mutations in a single gene that disrupt how proteins are shuttled around within cells. Patients with the newly discovered syndrome have a poor prognosis, and at present can only be treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs. Many have lung disease so severe…
  • Household pets can transmit infections to people

    Immune System / Vaccines News From Medical News Today
    20 Apr 2015 | 9:00 am
    Household pets can transmit infection to people, especially those with weak immune systems, young children, pregnant women and seniors, according to an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association...
  • Exercising tactically for metabolic control

    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue
    Chacko, E.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
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    Anatomy News

  • MPD waiting for milk tea victims' autopsy results

    20 Apr 2015 | 8:44 pm
    … the results of the final autopsy on two persons who died … has been discharged from the hospital. Read more on The Philippine …
  • Caroni car dealer shot dead

    20 Apr 2015 | 8:31 pm
    … . An autopsy on Mohammed, 26, was performed at the Forensic Science Centre … condition at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex, Mt Hope. A senior … Lalla to the Eric Williams Medical Complex. Mohammed died while being …
  • ...Awaiting report on first-time mom’s death

    20 Apr 2015 | 8:31 pm
    … section at the Women’s Hospital, Mt Hope. Her husband, Juma … he took her to the hospital where she was admitted. After … a full report today.” An autopsy was expected to be performed … body at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex, Mt Hope, yesterday. Facts …
  • Prevalence, cost of dementia in T&T

    20 Apr 2015 | 7:27 pm
    … of Human Anatomy, all from the Faculty of Medical Sciences at UWI’s St Augustine Campus, have been conducting dementia research … of The University of the West Indies. The key research instrument, the …
  • Coroner: Condon autopsy shows no signs of foul play

    20 Apr 2015 | 6:15 pm
    … Coroner Gary Hargrove said the autopsy on 28-year-old Ashley Kaye Condon … for work at a local hospital. Ocean Spring police Capt. William …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Long non-coding RNA modulates colorectal cancer metabolism

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:25 pm
    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are unusual in that they don’t encode proteins like normal RNA. Yet they do play a role in regulating cellular functions and interest cancer researchers.
  • Potential new lung cancer therapy

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:24 pm
    New findings about regulation of PD-L1, a protein that allows cancer to evade the immune system, has shown therapeutic promise for several cancers, including the most common form of lung cancer.
  • Cancer-inflammation 'vicious cycle' detailed in new study

    20 Apr 2015 | 12:48 pm
    New findings hidden within the complex machinery behind the chronic inflammation-cancer feedback loop have been discerned.
  • Changes in cancer epigenome implicated in chemotherapy resistance, lymphoma relapse

    20 Apr 2015 | 10:07 am
    Genomic studies have illuminated the ways in which malfunctioning genes can drive cancer growth while stunting the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and other treatments. But new findings indicate that these genes are only partly to blame for why treatment that was at one point effective ultimately fails for about 40 percent of patients diagnosed with the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
  • Childhood syndrome combining lung disease, arthritis identified

    20 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
    Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis. The hereditary disorder, which appears in early childhood, had never been diagnosed as a single syndrome. The new research revealed that it is caused by mutations in a single gene that disrupt how proteins are shuttled around within cells. Patients with the newly discovered syndrome have a poor prognosis, and at present can only be treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs. Many have lung disease so severe…
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Why Is Your Body 98 6°F? by exploriumkaylee: Why is your body...

    scientiflix
    13 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Why Is Your Body 98 6°F? by exploriumkaylee: Why is your body specifically at 98.6°F (or 37°C)? Let’s find out! Primary Sources: http://mbio.asm.org/content/1/5/e00212-10.full?pagewanted=all http://www.biologyreference.com/Ta-Va/Temperature-Regulation.html http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/200/10/1623.abstract?ijkey=218d01956b71f203c46fd5ce6d6bcefae6d2e1cd&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha http://dwb.unl.edu/teacher/nsf/c01/c01links/www.science.mcmaster.ca/biology/4s03/thermoregulation.html
  • Physiology of Flavors in Beer - Lactobacillus Species

    Matt
    13 Apr 2015 | 10:55 am
    Happy Spring everyone, it is finally spring and the long winter is over. Of course on the first day of spring here in D.C. we got some snow. Go figure. I’ve had a lot going on lately with home life and work life and sort of let this blog go to seed for more than a month. I am back and have about 8 posts in the queue but I haven’t scheduled them yet…they are not ALL saisons…although several are. I think it is about time for another one of these science posts. This blog isn’t just about hoppy saisons, although you can read all about those in the recipe posts. This…
  • Compassion: Changing the World and Ourselves

    My Warfarin Diet
    13 Apr 2015 | 10:00 am
    …what if recognising our shared humanity was more than just a sentimental ideal? What if consciously practising kindness could change the wiring of your brain and make you live longer? This is neuroscience’s latest frontier – a growing body of research that shows compassion could be the key to improved health, happiness and longevity. Brain imaging reveals that exercising compassion stimulates the same pleasure centres associated with the drive for food, water and sex. Other studies show it can be protective against disease and increase lifespan. Source: Changing the world and…
  • Cholecystectomy (Gallbladder Removal Surgery) This 3D medical...

    scientiflix
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:56 am
    Cholecystectomy (Gallbladder Removal Surgery) This 3D medical animation shows a minimally invasive gallbladder removal surgery, or cholecystectomy. The animation begins by showing the normal anatomy of the liver and gallbladder. Over time, gallstones form within the gallbladder, blocking the cystic duct, and causing the gallbladder to become enlarged and inflamed. This minimally invasive procedure (MIP), sometimes called a ‘lap chole’, begins with the insertion of four trocar devices, allowing the physician to see inside the abdomen without making a large incision. Air is added to the…
  • Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn

    Thomas Medina
    13 Apr 2015 | 9:03 am
    When students use their bodies in the learning process, it can have a big effect, even if it seems silly or unconnected to the learning goal at hand. Researchers have found that when students use their bodies while doing mathematical storytelling (like with word problems, for example), it changes the way they think about math. “We understand language in a richer, fuller way if we can connect it to the actions we perform,” said Sian Beilock, professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. Consider this word problem: Two hippos and two alligators are at the zoo. Pete the zookeeper…
 
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Offer new treatments only as part of post-market trials until data on meaningful outcomes are available, says Ben Goldacre to BMJ

    15 Apr 2015 | 4:30 am
    Watch the video from the BMJ channel below: Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • High-fructose sweeteners are a principal driver of type 2 diabetes

    14 Apr 2015 | 7:16 am
    High-fructose sweeteners are a principal driver of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its consequences, according to a recent report in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Conversely, whole foods that contain fructose (eg, fruits and vegetables) pose no problem for health and are likely protective against diabetes and adverse CV outcomes. Read more here: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(15)00040-3/abstractOur own Dr Hyman discusses How to Avoid the Hidden Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup in this video from the official Cleveland Clinic YouTube channel: "Dr. Mark Hyman,…
  • This is what happens when social media sites go too far

    14 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    From Ray Ray, gardener and YouTube star: "This is what happens when social media sites go too far. Mr Zuckerberg, there are certain things you (Facebook) can NOT have from me." Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Facebook Launches Suicide Prevention Initiative - WSJ video

    8 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    Facebook is partnering with suicide prevention organizations on a new tool to identify people in distress. Forefront research scientist Ursula Whiteside discusses the project with Sara Murray. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory"

    7 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP— Leonard Nimoy (@TheRealNimoy) February 23, 2015Don't smoke. I did. Wish I never had. LLAP— Leonard Nimoy (@TheRealNimoy) January 11, 2015 Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Clarification of methods used to validate surface EMG decomposition algorithms as described by Farina et al. (2014)

    De Luca, C. J., Nawab, S. H., Kline, J. C.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
  • Prolonged observation time reveals temporal fluctuations in the sublingual microcirculation in pigs given arginine vasopressin

    Kildal, A. B., Stenberg, T. A., Sanden, E., Myrmel, T., How, O.-J.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
    Intravital videomicroscopy of sublingual microcirculation is used to monitor critically ill patients. Existing guidelines suggest averaging handheld video recordings of ~20 s in duration from five areas. We assessed whether an extended observation time may provide additional information on the microcirculation. Pigs (n = 8) under general anesthesia were divided between two groups, one with manually held camera, in which microcirculation was assessed continuously for 1 min in five areas, and one with a fixed camera, in which the observation time was extended to 10 min in a single area. The…
  • Sarcolipin overexpression improves muscle energetics and reduces fatigue

    Sopariwala, D. H., Pant, M., Shaikh, S. A., Goonasekera, S. A., Molkentin, J. D., Weisleder, N., Ma, J., Pan, Z., Periasamy, M.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a regulator of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase in skeletal muscle. Recent studies using SLN-null mice have identified SLN as a key player in muscle thermogenesis and metabolism. In this study, we exploited a SLN overexpression (SlnOE) mouse model to determine whether increased SLN level affected muscle contractile properties, exercise capacity/fatigue, and metabolic rate in whole animals and isolated muscle. We found that SlnOE mice are more resistant to fatigue and can run significantly longer distances than wild-type (WT). Studies with isolated extensor…
  • Physical exercise increases autophagic signaling through ULK1 in human skeletal muscle

    Moller, A. B., Vendelbo, M. H., Christensen, B., Clasen, B. F., Bak, A. M., Jorgensen, J. O. L., Moller, N., Jessen, N.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
    Data from transgenic animal models suggest that exercise-induced autophagy is critical for adaptation to physical training, and that Unc-51 like kinase-1 (ULK1) serves as an important regulator of autophagy. Phosphorylation of ULK1 at Ser555 stimulates autophagy, whereas phosphorylation at Ser757 is inhibitory. To determine whether exercise regulates ULK1 phosphorylation in humans in vivo in a nutrient-dependent manner, we examined skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy humans after 1-h cycling exercise at 50% maximal O2 uptake on two occasions: 1) during a 36-h fast, and 2) during continuous…
  • Exercising tactically for metabolic control

    Chacko, E.
    15 Apr 2015 | 9:30 am
 
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    Digestive System News

  • Health tips: Extinguishing heartburn

    20 Apr 2015 | 10:40 pm
    … Boardman. "This gives your stomach a chance to process … move it through your digestive system. Your stomach will then be … stomach acids." Quit smoking Smoking is bad news for health … the oesophageal muscles that keep stomach acid where it belongs,…
  • Foods for fending off colds and flu

    20 Apr 2015 | 7:36 pm
    … control of your immune health this winter. Advertisement … importantly is keeping our gut healthy. For some time researchers … guts that are far from functionally optimally. Working towards better gut … digestive tract undigested and feed good bacteria in the gut. …
  • Humans are losing healthy bacteria to modern lifestyles: study

    20 Apr 2015 | 6:48 pm
    … the immune system and helping digestion. But modern diets, antibiotics and … . A study looking at the gut, mouth and skin microbes in … to functions essential to human health including immune system development, processing …
  • It's time to start eating carbs again health gurus say

    20 Apr 2015 | 5:26 pm
    … mood swings, poor concentration and gut problems - and may … an essential part of a healthy, balanced diet Processed carbohydrates … only unpleasant, but can cause digestive problems and conditions such … has been linked to bowel cancer.  A very low-carb, …
  • Microbes Help Produce Serotonin in Gut

    20 Apr 2015 | 3:49 pm
    … diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and … many aspects of human health, but Hsiao cautions that … ;Indigenous Bacteria from the Gut Microbiota Regulate Host Serotonin … and University of Chicago Digestive Diseases Center Core to …
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Adenosine receptor can activate 'off signals' for pain

    16 Apr 2015 | 4:25 pm
    Pain is the most common reason that people seek medical attention, but the available treatments are not always successful at relieving pain in patients with chronic pain. Now researchers found that drugs targeting the A3 adenosine receptor can "turn off" pain signals in the spinal cord to provide relief from chronic pain.
  • Osteoporosis diagnosis contributes to hearing loss risk

    16 Apr 2015 | 10:20 am
    People who have osteoporosis face a 1.76-fold higher risk of developing sudden deafness than those who do not have the bone disease, according to a new study. Osteoporosis is a progressive condition in which bones become structurally weak and are more likely to fracture or break. More than 40 million people nationwide already have osteoporosis or are at risk of developing the condition due to low bone mass. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL), also called sudden deafness, is an unexplained, rapid loss of hearing that typically happens in one ear. About half of the people who develop SSHL…
  • Increasing evidence points to inflammation as source of nervous system manifestations of Lyme disease

    16 Apr 2015 | 5:43 am
    About 15 percent of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease. The investigators also showed that the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone prevents many of these reactions.
  • Stronger muscles make for healthier bone development

    14 Apr 2015 | 5:37 am
    Higher muscle mass is strongly linked with healthier bone development in children, researchers report. Researchers also found no relationship between fat mass and bone development, indicating it is not an important factor in childhood skeletal strength.
  • Researchers find new gene involved in blood-forming stem cells

    13 Apr 2015 | 3:37 pm
    A gene critical to controlling the body's ability to create blood cells and immune cells from blood-forming stem cells -- known as hematopoietic stem cells -- has been discovered by researchers. Along with helping scientists better understand the body's basic processes, the discovery opens new lines of inquiry about the gene's potential role in cancers known to involve other members of the same gene family, like leukemia, or those where the gene might be highly expressed or mutated.
 
 
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