Anatomy

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  • The Truth of Lactic Acid cause Muscle Soreness

    WordPress Tag: Physiology
    jmac1989
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:39 pm
    With me training for a half-marathon, I have been sore and stiff due to my training sessions. Through my years of being an athlete when I was younger and lifting and running now in my 20s; I was under a belief that my soreness was due to lactic Acid; in reality, there is more than Lactic Acid involved. Lactic Acid occurs due to the of lack of oxygen during the breakdown of Glucose called Glycolysis within the muscle (Kraemer, W., Fleck, S.; Deschenes, M; 2012, p. 34). But they are one of four ways that are typically all involved with Muscle Soreness and Lactic Acid is just one of them.
  • Muscle and Fat - Total Recall - Myths busted by Apurva Malewar a.k.a Carlos

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    amalewar
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
                                                             Muscle and Fat – Total Recall – Myths busted Hola Amigos!!! I had this rad conversation today at the gym with a bunch of SOME highly ignorant folks, that decided to educate me on Fat versus he Muscle… Lol!!! Their claims were that pretty awesome,which was that fat is heavier than muscle and this the main reason why people who are fat, apparently!!!  are heavier than people who have lean muscle mass. It was quite hilarious to observe their over confident rant, backing their…
  • CRYDER'S: MUSCLE TUTORIAL AND SELF-QUIZ PowerPoint

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    MyAnatomyMentor
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:33 pm
    CRYDER’S MUSCLES TUTORIAL & QUIZ
  • Autopsy finds pregnant woman died of strangulation

    Anatomy News
    30 Jul 2014 | 11:20 am
    WYOMING — A medical examiner has found that a pregnant Michigan woman police say was killed by a man she connected with through Craigslist was strangled with a rope, strap or other device. The Grand Rapids Press reported today that a death certificate on …
  • Mysterious esophagus disease is autoimmune after all

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Jul 2014 | 4:36 am
    Achalasia is a rare disease – it affects 1 in 100,000 people – characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. While its cause remains unknown, a new study confirms for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin.
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    Anatomy News

  • Autopsy finds pregnant woman died of strangulation

    30 Jul 2014 | 11:20 am
    WYOMING — A medical examiner has found that a pregnant Michigan woman police say was killed by a man she connected with through Craigslist was strangled with a rope, strap or other device. The Grand Rapids Press reported today that a death certificate on …
  • Autopsy finds woman died of ligature strangulation

    30 Jul 2014 | 6:59 am
    WYOMING, Mich. (AP) — A medical examiner has found that a pregnant Michigan woman police say was killed by a man she connected with through Craigslist was strangled with a rope, strap or other device. The Grand Rapids Press reported Wednesday (http://bit. …
  • Autopsy To Determine If Body Found In Whiting Is Missing Boater

    30 Jul 2014 | 5:48 am
    … Morning. Sign Up (CBS) – An autopsy was scheduled for Wednesday on … , 26, died at a Chicago hospital after she was pulled from …
  • 50 new jobs at Dublin medical app developer

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:14 am
    … founded in 2004 and produces medical, health and fitness desktop and … announced today will be in research and development, marketing and sales … Anatomy, a detailed 3D anatomy engine for medical reference; Muscle System Pro; and anatomy-themed …
  • Beaten-to-death referee's mum doubts son's autopsy report

    29 Jul 2014 | 10:38 pm
    … , has expressed doubt over the autopsy report by doctors that claimed … and I have been to hospital just once, so was my … death days after, but an autopsy ordered by the GFA proved …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Mysterious esophagus disease is autoimmune after all

    29 Jul 2014 | 4:36 am
    Achalasia is a rare disease – it affects 1 in 100,000 people – characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. While its cause remains unknown, a new study confirms for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin.
  • Healthy lifestyle may buffer against stress-related cell aging

    29 Jul 2014 | 4:35 am
    A new study shows that while the impact of life’s stressors accumulate overtime and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well.
  • Forced mutations doom HIV: How potential HIV drug exacts its toll on viral populations

    28 Jul 2014 | 1:23 pm
    Fifteen years ago, medical researchers had a novel idea for an HIV drug. They thought if they could induce the virus to mutate uncontrollably, they could force it to weaken and eventually die out -- a strategy that our immune system uses against many viruses.
  • Cell's recycling center implicated in division decisions

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Most cells do not divide unless there is enough oxygen present to support their offspring, but certain cancer cells and other cell types circumvent this rule. Researchers have now identified a mechanism that overrides the cells' warning signals, enabling cancers to continue to divide even without a robust blood supply. In the process, the researchers found that lysosomes -- the cell's protein 'recycling centers' -- help govern cell division decisions.
  • Researchers produce record-length mirror-image protein

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Biochemists have reported an advance in the production of functional mirror-image proteins. In a new study, they have chemically synthesized a record-length mirror-image protein and used this protein to demonstrate that a cellular chaperone, which helps "fold" large or complex proteins into their functional state, has a previously unappreciated talent -- the ability to fold mirror-image proteins. These findings will greatly facilitate mirror-image protein production for applications in drug discovery and synthetic biology.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • The Truth of Lactic Acid cause Muscle Soreness

    jmac1989
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:39 pm
    With me training for a half-marathon, I have been sore and stiff due to my training sessions. Through my years of being an athlete when I was younger and lifting and running now in my 20s; I was under a belief that my soreness was due to lactic Acid; in reality, there is more than Lactic Acid involved. Lactic Acid occurs due to the of lack of oxygen during the breakdown of Glucose called Glycolysis within the muscle (Kraemer, W., Fleck, S.; Deschenes, M; 2012, p. 34). But they are one of four ways that are typically all involved with Muscle Soreness and Lactic Acid is just one of them.
  • Hyperleucocytosis and Leukostasis

    Avinash Deo
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:33 am
    Leukostasis is a oncological emergency seen in patients with leukaemia who present with pronounced leucocytosis. It is seen in about 5-30% of adult acute leukaemia cases. It results from slugging of microcirculation by leucocytes.  It is associated with a mortality of 20-40%. Pathogenesis of Leukostasis Manifestations of leukostasis result from impaired circulation in the affected vascular bed. Leukocytosis impairs circulation because of Increased viscosity Formation of intravascular leukocyte aggregates (white bland thrombi) Increased adhesion of blasts to the endothelium Cells increase…
  • Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    liftlifelovelife
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Call me crazy but I love suffering the day after my workout. – Anonymous Walking up the stairs, legs shaking, there’s sweat running down his brow, and he’s gripping tight on those handle reels, sounds like this man had an intense leg workout two days ago. D.O.M.S If you have every had this experience you’ve ran into a term physiologist call D.O.M.S or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. This term is the description of a soreness that may cause discomfort when stretching but in not to the degree of an injury. If you’re new to this feeling embrace the suck, for this pain will cause…
  • Inflammation in Maternal Blood - C-reactive Protein as a Biomarker for Schizophrenia

    researchinitiative
    8 Jul 2014 | 9:22 pm
    Study Shows Link Between Inflammation in Maternal Blood and Schizophrenia in Offspring http://www.mailman.columbia.edu July 7, 2014 — Maternal inflammation as indicated by the presence in maternal blood of early gestational C-reactive protein—an established inflammatory biomarker—appears to be associated with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring, according to researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. The study, “Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and…
  • Aortic Stenosis

    teutonic13
    8 Jul 2014 | 8:17 am
    Aortic Stenosis Rheumatic heart disease and calcification deposits due to age (senile calcific aorti
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) - DocMikeEvans animation video

    30 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dr. Mike Evans is founder of the Health Design Lab at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, an Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of Toronto, and a staff physician at St. Michael's Hospital.Written and Narrated by Dr. Mike Evans. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • National Library of Medicine, world's largest medical library, was a shelf of books in Surgeon General office in 1818

    29 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world, started in 1818 as a shelf of books the office of the Surgeon General The National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world, began in 1818 as the US Army Medical Library, in Washington, DC, essentially a shelf of books in the office of Joseph Lovell, then Surgeon General and the head of the Army Medical Department. By the time of the Civil War the book collection consisted of about 2000 volumes and, no longer fitting in the office, was moved to a bank building.The library, then as now, was constantly…
  • Top medicine articles for July 2014

    23 Jul 2014 | 7:38 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Migraines Linked to Increased Risk of 'Silent Strokes' http://buff.ly/1hTE5RuDoctor’s Salaries Are Not the Big Cost - NYTimes http://buff.ly/QWe2lx -- "There is a startling secret behind America’s health care hierarchy: Physicians, the most highly trained members in the industry’s work force, are on average right in the middle of the compensation pack. That is because the biggest bucks are currently earned not through the delivery of care, but from overseeing the business of medicine.The base pay of insurance…
  • Pancreatic Cancer - 2014 update from Am Fam Physician

    22 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Risk factors include:- family history- smoking- chronic pancreatitis- obesity- diabetes mellitus- heavy alcohol use- possible dietary factorsSymptomsBecause more than two-thirds of adenocarcinomas occur in the head of the pancreas, abdominal pain, jaundice, pruritus, dark urine, and acholic stools may be presenting symptoms. DiagnosisIn symptomatic patients, the serum tumor marker cancer antigen 19-9 can be used to confirm the diagnosis and to predict prognosis and recurrence after resection.
  • Exercise may keep you young - how exactly? (DW video)

    17 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    How exercise keeps us young | In Good Shape - DW Interview - YouTube http://buff.ly/1hNElr1 -- The sports medicine expert Dr. Fernando Dimeo explains why. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Age-related changes in inter-joint coordination during walking

    Ihlen, E. A. F.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    Existing methods to assess inter-joint coordination in human walking have several important weaknesses. These methods are unable to define 1) the instantaneous changes in coordination within the stride cycle, 2) coordination between multiple joints, or 3) the coupling strength of joint rotations rather than their phase relationships. The present paper introduces a new method called generalized wavelet coherence analysis (GWCA) that solves these three fundamental limitations of previous methods. GWCA combines wavelet coherence analysis with a matrix correlation method to define instantaneous…
  • Recruitment and plasticity in diaphragm, intercostal, and abdominal muscles in unanesthetized rats

    Navarrete-Opazo, A., Mitchell, G. S.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    Although rats are a frequent model for studies of plasticity in respiratory motor control, the relative capacity of rat accessory respiratory muscles to express plasticity is not well known, particularly in unanesthetized animals. Here, we characterized external intercostal (T2, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8, T9 EIC) and abdominal muscle (external oblique and rectus abdominis) electromyogram (EMG) activity in unanesthetized rats via radiotelemetry during normoxia (Nx: 21% O2) and following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH: 10 x 5-min, 10.5% O2; 5-min intervals). Diaphragm and T2–T5 EIC EMG…
  • Reduced skeletal muscle AMPK and mitochondrial markers do not promote age-induced insulin resistance

    Bujak, A. L., Blumer, R. M. E., Marcinko, K., Fullerton, M. D., Kemp, B. E., Steinberg, G. R.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    In both rodents and humans, aging-associated reductions in skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and mitochondrial function have been linked to the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. However, whether reductions in skeletal muscle AMPK and mitochondrial capacity actually precipitate the development of aging-induced insulin resistance is not known. Mice lacking both isoforms of the AMPK β-subunit in skeletal muscle (AMPK-MKO) have no detectable AMPK activity and are characterized by large reductions in exercise capacity, mitochondrial content, and…
  • The effects of PGC-1{alpha} on control of microvascular PO2 kinetics following onset of muscle contractions

    Kano, Y., Miura, S., Eshima, H., Ezaki, O., Poole, D. C.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    During contractions, regulation of microvascular oxygen partial pressure (Pmvo2), which drives blood-myocyte O2 flux, is a function of skeletal muscle fiber type and oxidative capacity and can be altered by exercise training. The kinetics of Pmvo2 during contractions in predominantly fast-twitch muscles evinces a more rapid fall to far lower levels compared with slow-twitch counterparts. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) improves endurance performance, in part, due to mitochondrial biogenesis, a fiber-type switch to oxidative fibers, and…
  • Length-force characteristics of in vivo human muscle reflected by supersonic shear imaging

    Sasaki, K., Toyama, S., Ishii, N.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    Recently, an ultrasound-based elastography technique has been used to measure stiffness (shear modulus) of an active human muscle along the axis of contraction. Using this technique, we explored 1) whether muscle shear modulus, like muscle force, is length dependent; and 2) whether the length dependence of muscle shear modulus is consistent between electrically elicited and voluntary contractions. From nine healthy participants, ankle joint torque and shear modulus of the tibialis anterior muscle were measured at five different ankle joint angles during tetanic contractions and during maximal…
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    MedPage Today Cardiovascular

  • EndoType: Health Nuts? They Grow on Trees

    30 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    (MedPage Today) -- A tree nut industry group is reaping the fruits of its labor this week, with the publication of two positive studies that it sponsored.
  • Menopause HT Doesn't Touch Arterial Plaque

    30 Jul 2014 | 10:45 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Hormone replacement therapy early in menopause does not reduce the risk of atherosclerosis in low-risk women, a finding now confirmed by data from the KEEPS trial.
  • Prediction Update: Heart - Medical 2

    30 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Early this year we asked, "What will be the most important clinical development in cardiovascular medicine in 2014?" Now, at the half-year mark, our experts review how their predictions are holding up.
  • Stroke Rounds: Guidelines on rtPA Brain Bleeds Lack Data (CME/CE)

    29 Jul 2014 | 11:30 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Current guidelines for treating brain bleeds caused by thrombolytic therapy for strokes are based on empirical evidence alone and widely used treatments may not be adequate, researchers suggested.
  • Run for Your Life? Right! (CME/CE)

    29 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Running for as little as 5 to 10 minutes a day, once or twice a week, or at slow speeds was associated with substantial mortality benefits over 15 years, a prospective study showed.
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • The role of dairy in maintaining adult bone and skeletal muscle health

    28 Jul 2014 | 9:37 am
    Understanding that diets are often built around food groups rather than specific nutrients, researchers from Switzerland, France, and North America decided to examine interactions between four nutrients found in dairy products and their role in preserving bone and skeletal muscle.
  • Female triathletes at risk for pelvic floor disorders, other complications

    24 Jul 2014 | 2:18 pm
    Female triathletes are at risk for pelvic floor disorders, decreased energy, menstrual irregularities and abnormal bone density, according to researchers. "There has been a surge in popularity of high-impact sports such as triathlons, but little has been known until now about the prevalence of pelvic health and certain other issues associated with endurance training and events," said a study investigator.
  • Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury in rodents

    23 Jul 2014 | 11:18 am
    A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists have found. In a study on rodents, researchers achieved this breakthrough by turning back the developmental clock in a molecular pathway critical to the formation of corticospinal tract nerve connections and providing a scaffold so that neuronal axons at the injury site could grow and link up again.
  • First study worldwide to show higher concentration of trace elements in bone cancer

    21 Jul 2014 | 7:01 am
    In a study that is the only one of its kind worldwide, researchers have investigated the distribution of trace elements in the tissue of bone tumors. The result: tumor tissue contains higher concentrations of trace elements. This could represent a starting point for the development of targeted therapies for bone cancer.
  • Orthopedic surgery generally safe for patients age 80 and older

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:50 am
    Over the past decade, a greater number of patients, age 80 and older, are having elective orthopedic surgery. A new study has found that these surgeries are generally safe with mortality rates decreasing for total hip (THR) and total knee (TKR) replacement and spinal fusion surgeries, and complication rates decreasing for total knee replacement and spinal fusion in patients with few or no comorbidities (other conditions or diseases).
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Mysterious esophagus disease is autoimmune after all

    29 Jul 2014 | 4:36 am
    Achalasia is a rare disease – it affects 1 in 100,000 people – characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. While its cause remains unknown, a new study confirms for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin.
  • HIV treatment: Interfering with interferon

    28 Jul 2014 | 6:44 am
    Using the body's natural virus killers to prevent and treat HIV infection has been problematic until now because of the strong inflammatory response these molecules can arouse as they get rid of the invaders. Now, research has demonstrated how suppressing the activity of these molecules -- interferons -- around the time of infection could have long-term implications for the course of the disease.
  • Drugs used to treat lung disease work with body clock

    27 Jul 2014 | 1:56 pm
    Scientists have discovered why medication to treat asthma and pneumonia can become ineffective. The findings show that drugs widely used to treat lung diseases work with the body clock. The research found out that cells lining the lung airways have their own body clock which is the time-keeper for lung inflammation - both conditions cause swelling (inflammation) in the lungs.
  • Nanoparticle 'alarm clock' tested to awaken immune systems put to sleep by cancer

    25 Jul 2014 | 8:07 am
    Researchers are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. One pioneering approach uses nanoparticles to jumpstart the body’s ability to fight tumors. Nanoparticles are too small to imagine. One billion could fit on the head of a pin. This makes them stealthy enough to penetrate cancer cells with therapeutic agents such as antibodies, drugs, vaccine type viruses, or even metallic particles.
  • Linking microbial, immune environment in semen to HIV viral load, transmission

    24 Jul 2014 | 11:42 am
    HIV infection re-shapes the relationship between semen bacteria and immune factors which in turn affects viral load, suggesting that the semen microbiome plays a role in sexual transmission of HIV, researchers report. While HIV is found in many body fluids, sexual transmission through semen is the most common route of infection.
 
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Social origins of intelligence in the brain

    29 Jul 2014 | 8:54 am
    By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling -- and beginning to answer -- longstanding questions about how the brain works. The researchers found that brain regions that contribute to optimal social functioning also are vital to general intelligence and to emotional intelligence. This finding bolsters the view that general intelligence emerges from the emotional and social context of one's life.
  • Autistic brain less flexible at taking on tasks

    29 Jul 2014 | 8:54 am
    The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study.
  • Disruptive effects of anesthesia on brain cell connections are temporary, study suggests

    28 Jul 2014 | 11:15 am
    A study of juvenile rat brain cells suggests that the effects of a commonly used anesthetic drug on the connections between brain cells are temporary.
  • Anti-inflammatory drug can prevent neuron loss in Parkinson's model

    25 Jul 2014 | 10:16 am
    An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease, a study has shown. The findings demonstrate that the drug, called XPro1595, can reach the brain at sufficient levels and have beneficial effects when administered by subcutaneous injection, like an insulin shot. Previous studies of XPro1595 in animals tested more invasive modes of delivery, such as direct injection into the brain.
  • Klotho: neuroprotective against Alzheimer's disease

    24 Jul 2014 | 2:21 pm
    Researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease. They discovered that pre-treatment of neurons with the anti-aging protein Klotho can prevent neuron death in the presence of the toxic amyloid protein and glutamate. Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent age-related dementia affecting 5.4 million Americans including 13 percent of people age 65 and older and more than 40 percent of people over the age of 85.
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