Anatomy

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  • No anti-clotting treatment needed for most kids undergoing spine surgeries

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    15 Jul 2014 | 5:49 am
    Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new study. Because clotting risk in children is poorly understood, treatment guidelines are largely absent, leaving doctors caring for pediatric patients at a loss on whom to treat and when.
  • Yoo’s autopsy may not fully settle cause or time of his death

    Anatomy News
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:35 am
    … . Carollo Hospital in Suncheon, South Jeolla, who did the initial autopsy of … against the person’s past medical records. “I assume Yoo’s … ,” said Park Ui-wu, forensic science professor at Konkuk University. “Even if toxic …
  • Unsuspected characteristics of new cystic fibrosis drugs found, offering potential paths to more effective therapies

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:20 pm
    A large phase 3 clinical trial for cystic fibrosis patients has concluded, showing that a combination of two new cystic fibrosis drugs modestly improved lung function and offered better health outcomes for some patients. Now, scientists have shown that one of these drugs counteracts the intended beneficial molecular effect of the other.
  • Burning fat and looking good - Myths busted by Carlos!!! A.K.A Apurva Malewar

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    amalewar
    23 Jul 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Eating Right!!!  quite a predicament when it comes to staying fit. I always go by one rule, you being fit starts in the kitchen, and I quote “eat right, workout and sleep tight”. I am sure most of you would agree with and let me share a few thoughts, this is something most of you already know and it’s how you can transform your body into what you really what. It aint easy, you all need to have goals, and ya’ll need to map a plan to achieve your fitness goals. Think!!! don’t just follow people blindly Not having a goal is more like shooting arrows in the dark, seems to me most…
  • Maternal Immune Response to Prenatal Immune Challenge in a Neurodevelopmental Model

    WordPress Tag: Physiology
    researchinitiative
    1 Jul 2014 | 5:42 pm
    The risk for behavioural deficits is determined by the maternal immune response to prenatal immune challenge in a neurodevelopmental model. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24973728 Abstract BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is a highly disabling psychiatric disorder with a proposed neurodevelopmental basis. One mechanism through which genetic and environmental risk factors might act is by triggering persistent brain inflammation, as evidenced by long-lasting neuro-immunological disturbances in patients. Our goal was to investigate whether microglia activation is a neurobiological correlate to the…
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    Anatomy News

  • Yoo’s autopsy may not fully settle cause or time of his death

    24 Jul 2014 | 11:35 am
    … . Carollo Hospital in Suncheon, South Jeolla, who did the initial autopsy of … against the person’s past medical records. “I assume Yoo’s … ,” said Park Ui-wu, forensic science professor at Konkuk University. “Even if toxic …
  • Doctor Dissects the Anatomy of Flavor at Catersource's Art of Catering Food Conference

    24 Jul 2014 | 10:15 am
    MINNEAPOLIS, July 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- As a featured speaker at Catersource's Art of Catering Food conference in Atlanta, GA August 4­–6 at the Atlanta Convention Center at AmericasMart, Dr Larrian Gillespie, CEO of Culinary Science Investigations …
  • Autopsy on Sutthi rules out murder

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    … , the Central Institute of Forensic Science (CIFS) revealed yesterday.  Suwanarong Srisuwan … Bangkok on Monday for the autopsy after his family postponed the … . He was taken to Rayong Hospital and pronounced dead the following …
  • The Week Ender: Happenings July 25-27

    24 Jul 2014 | 6:05 am
    … at Yale’s museums. Yale University Art Gallery 1111 Chapel St … Ireland. Free.   Center for Science and Social Science Information Kline Biology Tower … memorabilia, as well as historical anatomical and medical materials. Free.     Yale Peabody …
  • Euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke still fighting old foes

    24 Jul 2014 | 5:36 am
    … before returning to study medicine at Sydney University after a serious injury … him admitted to Royal Darwin Hospital, and there he languished for … seized on media reports the autopsy on Ms Crick found no … decision to end his life, researches it in the way he …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Unsuspected characteristics of new cystic fibrosis drugs found, offering potential paths to more effective therapies

    23 Jul 2014 | 12:20 pm
    A large phase 3 clinical trial for cystic fibrosis patients has concluded, showing that a combination of two new cystic fibrosis drugs modestly improved lung function and offered better health outcomes for some patients. Now, scientists have shown that one of these drugs counteracts the intended beneficial molecular effect of the other.
  • Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent 'imprinted' genes are inherited from

    23 Jul 2014 | 10:14 am
    The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research.
  • Genetics of cancer: Non-coding DNA can finally be decoded

    23 Jul 2014 | 10:14 am
    Cancer is a disease of the genome resulting from a combination of genetic modifications, or mutations. We inherit from our parents strong or weak predispositions to developing certain kinds of cancer; in addition, we also accumulate new mutations in our cells throughout our lifetime. Although the genetic origins of cancers have been studied for a long time, researchers were not able to measure the role of non-coding regions of the genome until now.
  • Protein evolution follows modular principle

    23 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    Similarities between proteins reveal that their great diversity has arisen from smaller building blocks. Proteins consist of long chains of 20 different amino acid building blocks that fold into a characteristic three-dimensional structure. It is noteworthy that some modules, known as protein domains, occur more frequently than others. Scientists suspect that many of these domains share a common evolutionary origin.
  • Vaccine for dust-mite allergies created

    22 Jul 2014 | 1:41 pm
    A vaccine for dust-mite allergies has been created, researchers report. In lab tests and animal trials, the nano-sized vaccine package was readily absorbed by immune cells and dramatically lowered allergic responses. "What is new about this is we have developed a vaccine against dust-mite allergens that hasn't been used before," says a corresponding author on the paper.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Maternal Immune Response to Prenatal Immune Challenge in a Neurodevelopmental Model

    researchinitiative
    1 Jul 2014 | 5:42 pm
    The risk for behavioural deficits is determined by the maternal immune response to prenatal immune challenge in a neurodevelopmental model. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24973728 Abstract BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is a highly disabling psychiatric disorder with a proposed neurodevelopmental basis. One mechanism through which genetic and environmental risk factors might act is by triggering persistent brain inflammation, as evidenced by long-lasting neuro-immunological disturbances in patients. Our goal was to investigate whether microglia activation is a neurobiological correlate to the…
  • Very Efficient Training . . .

    sportslabcccu
    30 Jun 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Data from our previous research suggests that in the ‘off’ season from September through to the other side of January, efficiency (the ratio of energy expended to work measured) drops away in cyclists.  It appears that exercise intensity plays a key role in keeping efficiency at a high level, but maintaining intensity is very often not an option for cyclists during the winter months due to a lack of racing in this period.  Cyclists then often use this phase to rack up steadier endurance miles; however this has the consequences of a reduction in efficiency of ~3-4% which we have…
  • কেমনে পড়বো? : তৃতীয় কিস্তি - Physiology

    Faisal Abdullah
    30 Jun 2014 | 2:52 pm
    ফিজিওলোজি সাবজেক্টটা কিভাবে পড়লে ভালো হয়?-এ নিয়ে আমি যথেষ্ঠ experiment করেছি।প্রথম ২-৩ মাস প্রত্যেকট
  • The first of many...

    Heather
    30 Jun 2014 | 11:47 am
    I mentioned in an earlier post that I’d been stockpiling articles and posts for daily uploads. This is the first of those, but before I get into that, I want to share where many of these are coming from, because that is, by itself, an incredibly useful professional tool. Recently (between starting the blog and restarting the blog), I joined/became more active on LinkedIn. I found groups there, including groups by interest. Among them are microbiology & immunology groups, and many of the links I will be sharing were discovered when they showed up in my inbox via a LinkedIn group!
  • The stunning health effects of magnetic fields on our physiology

    elementul huliganic
    30 Jun 2014 | 5:22 am
    The stunning health effects of magnetic fields on our physiology (NaturalNews) The world is surrounded by magnetic fields generated by the earth, solar storms, changes in the weather and everyday electrical devices. Recently, scientists have discovered that external magnetic fields can affect the body in both positive and negative ways, and the clinical observations are serious eye openers.Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/045779_magnetic_fields_physiology_brain_waves.html#ixzz367mOFVRm
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Top medicine articles for July 2014

    23 Jul 2014 | 7:38 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Migraines Linked to Increased Risk of 'Silent Strokes' http://buff.ly/1hTE5RuDoctor’s Salaries Are Not the Big Cost - NYTimes http://buff.ly/QWe2lx -- "There is a startling secret behind America’s health care hierarchy: Physicians, the most highly trained members in the industry’s work force, are on average right in the middle of the compensation pack. That is because the biggest bucks are currently earned not through the delivery of care, but from overseeing the business of medicine.The base pay of insurance…
  • Pancreatic Cancer - 2014 update from Am Fam Physician

    22 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Risk factors include:- family history- smoking- chronic pancreatitis- obesity- diabetes mellitus- heavy alcohol use- possible dietary factorsSymptomsBecause more than two-thirds of adenocarcinomas occur in the head of the pancreas, abdominal pain, jaundice, pruritus, dark urine, and acholic stools may be presenting symptoms. DiagnosisIn symptomatic patients, the serum tumor marker cancer antigen 19-9 can be used to confirm the diagnosis and to predict prognosis and recurrence after resection.
  • Exercise may keep you young - how exactly? (DW video)

    17 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    How exercise keeps us young | In Good Shape - DW Interview - YouTube http://buff.ly/1hNElr1 -- The sports medicine expert Dr. Fernando Dimeo explains why. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Two years ago, Jon Lord, legendary Deep Purple keyboard player, "passed from Darkness to Light"

    16 Jul 2014 | 5:38 am
    Performed in front of a live TV audience, Deep Purple storm through 'Child In Time', featuring the classic Mark II line up of Gillan/Glover/Lord/Paice/Blackmore:Jon Lord passed away on July 16, 2012 at age 71, from pancreatic cancer and pulmonary embolism.From Jon Lord's official website:Jon Lord, the legendary keyboard player with Deep Purple co-wrote many of the bands legendary songs including Smoke On The Water and played with many bands and musicians throughout his career.Best known for his Orchestral work Concerto for Group & Orchestra first performed at Royal Albert Hall with…
  • Elbow Pain in Adults - 2014 review from Am Fam Physician

    14 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    The elbow is a complex joint designed to withstand a wide range of dynamic exertional forces. The location and quality of elbow pain can generally localize the injury to one of the four anatomic regions: anterior, medial, lateral, or posterior. The history should include questions about the onset of pain, what the patient was doing when the pain started, and the type and frequency of athletic and occupational activities. What are the common causes?- Lateral and medial epicondylitis are two of the more common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. Patients have pain…
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Age-related changes in inter-joint coordination during walking

    Ihlen, E. A. F.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    Existing methods to assess inter-joint coordination in human walking have several important weaknesses. These methods are unable to define 1) the instantaneous changes in coordination within the stride cycle, 2) coordination between multiple joints, or 3) the coupling strength of joint rotations rather than their phase relationships. The present paper introduces a new method called generalized wavelet coherence analysis (GWCA) that solves these three fundamental limitations of previous methods. GWCA combines wavelet coherence analysis with a matrix correlation method to define instantaneous…
  • Recruitment and plasticity in diaphragm, intercostal, and abdominal muscles in unanesthetized rats

    Navarrete-Opazo, A., Mitchell, G. S.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    Although rats are a frequent model for studies of plasticity in respiratory motor control, the relative capacity of rat accessory respiratory muscles to express plasticity is not well known, particularly in unanesthetized animals. Here, we characterized external intercostal (T2, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8, T9 EIC) and abdominal muscle (external oblique and rectus abdominis) electromyogram (EMG) activity in unanesthetized rats via radiotelemetry during normoxia (Nx: 21% O2) and following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH: 10 x 5-min, 10.5% O2; 5-min intervals). Diaphragm and T2–T5 EIC EMG…
  • Reduced skeletal muscle AMPK and mitochondrial markers do not promote age-induced insulin resistance

    Bujak, A. L., Blumer, R. M. E., Marcinko, K., Fullerton, M. D., Kemp, B. E., Steinberg, G. R.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    In both rodents and humans, aging-associated reductions in skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and mitochondrial function have been linked to the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. However, whether reductions in skeletal muscle AMPK and mitochondrial capacity actually precipitate the development of aging-induced insulin resistance is not known. Mice lacking both isoforms of the AMPK β-subunit in skeletal muscle (AMPK-MKO) have no detectable AMPK activity and are characterized by large reductions in exercise capacity, mitochondrial content, and…
  • The effects of PGC-1{alpha} on control of microvascular PO2 kinetics following onset of muscle contractions

    Kano, Y., Miura, S., Eshima, H., Ezaki, O., Poole, D. C.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    During contractions, regulation of microvascular oxygen partial pressure (Pmvo2), which drives blood-myocyte O2 flux, is a function of skeletal muscle fiber type and oxidative capacity and can be altered by exercise training. The kinetics of Pmvo2 during contractions in predominantly fast-twitch muscles evinces a more rapid fall to far lower levels compared with slow-twitch counterparts. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) improves endurance performance, in part, due to mitochondrial biogenesis, a fiber-type switch to oxidative fibers, and…
  • Length-force characteristics of in vivo human muscle reflected by supersonic shear imaging

    Sasaki, K., Toyama, S., Ishii, N.
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    Recently, an ultrasound-based elastography technique has been used to measure stiffness (shear modulus) of an active human muscle along the axis of contraction. Using this technique, we explored 1) whether muscle shear modulus, like muscle force, is length dependent; and 2) whether the length dependence of muscle shear modulus is consistent between electrically elicited and voluntary contractions. From nine healthy participants, ankle joint torque and shear modulus of the tibialis anterior muscle were measured at five different ankle joint angles during tetanic contractions and during maximal…
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    MedPage Today Cardiovascular

  • Prediction Update: Alzheimer's Disease 2

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    (MedPage Today) -- In January, we asked three noted neurologists, "What do you anticipate will be the most important clinical development in Alzheimer's disease in 2014?" Now, at the half-year mark, we check in with them again to ask how their predictions are holding up.
  • DIY Pulse Check May Spot Atrial Fibrillation (CME/CE)

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:09 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Peripheral pulse measurement is a simple, accurate "first-step" screening tool for identifying paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients following stroke, researchers reported.
  • Morning Break: Book of Netter, Another Botched Execution

    24 Jul 2014 | 7:05 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web, gathered by the MedPage Today staff.
  • Monitoring, Dose Adjustment for Pradaxa? (CME/CE)

    23 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Blood level monitoring and dose adjustment for dabigatran (Pradaxa) could reduce major bleeding risk by 40% compared with well-controlled warfarin, according to company documents allegedly hidden from physicians and regulators.
  • Prediction Update: Heart Surgery

    23 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    (MedPage Today) -- Early this year we asked, "What will be the most important clinical development in heart surgery in 2014?" Now, at the half-year mark, our experts review how their predictions are holding up.
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury

    23 Jul 2014 | 11:18 am
    A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists have found. In a study on rodents, researchers achieved this breakthrough by turning back the developmental clock in a molecular pathway critical to the formation of corticospinal tract nerve connections and providing a scaffold so that neuronal axons at the injury site could grow and link up again.
  • First study worldwide to show higher concentration of trace elements in bone cancer

    21 Jul 2014 | 7:01 am
    In a study that is the only one of its kind worldwide, researchers have investigated the distribution of trace elements in the tissue of bone tumors. The result: tumor tissue contains higher concentrations of trace elements. This could represent a starting point for the development of targeted therapies for bone cancer.
  • Orthopedic surgery generally safe for patients age 80 and older

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:50 am
    Over the past decade, a greater number of patients, age 80 and older, are having elective orthopedic surgery. A new study has found that these surgeries are generally safe with mortality rates decreasing for total hip (THR) and total knee (TKR) replacement and spinal fusion surgeries, and complication rates decreasing for total knee replacement and spinal fusion in patients with few or no comorbidities (other conditions or diseases).
  • Aqueous two-phase systems enable multiplexing of homogeneous immunoassays

    16 Jul 2014 | 6:58 am
    A novel test simplifies disease detection by enabling simultaneous detection of multiple proteins in blood plasma. The test can accurately and simultaneously measure multiple proteins that indicate the presence of diseases like graft-versus-host disease (bone marrow transplant rejection) in only two hours, no washing steps, and using only a minute volume of blood plasma.
  • No anti-clotting treatment needed for most kids undergoing spine surgeries

    15 Jul 2014 | 5:49 am
    Blood clots occur so rarely in children undergoing spine operations that most patients require nothing more than vigilant monitoring after surgery and should be spared risky and costly anti-clotting medications, according to a new study. Because clotting risk in children is poorly understood, treatment guidelines are largely absent, leaving doctors caring for pediatric patients at a loss on whom to treat and when.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Vaccine for dust-mite allergies created

    22 Jul 2014 | 1:41 pm
    A vaccine for dust-mite allergies has been created, researchers report. In lab tests and animal trials, the nano-sized vaccine package was readily absorbed by immune cells and dramatically lowered allergic responses. "What is new about this is we have developed a vaccine against dust-mite allergens that hasn't been used before," says a corresponding author on the paper.
  • Pathogenic connection between autoimmune disorders, cancer found

    22 Jul 2014 | 11:24 am
    Autoimmune disorders may share certain pathogenic mechanisms with cancer, according to a new report. "This study opens a new therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis, as well as other autoimmune disorders," said one researcher. "Conventional therapies may improve the disease, but have numerous complications. This discovery may lead to a viable treatment option for the millions of American suffering from these disorders."
  • Anti-cancer drug kicks HIV out of hiding

    22 Jul 2014 | 7:22 am
    An anti-cancer drug can activate hidden HIV, a pilot study by HIV researchers has shown. The researchers found that the anti-cancer drug romidepsin increased the virus production in HIV-infected cells between 2.1 and 3.9 times above normal and that the viral load in the blood increased to measurable levels in five out of six patients with HIV infection.
  • Neuroprotective role of immune cell discovered

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:16 am
    A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to research. "Our findings suggest the innate immune system helps protect the brain after injury or during chronic disease, and this role should be further studied," the lead researcher said.
  • Stem cells aid muscle repair, strengthening after resistance exercise

    21 Jul 2014 | 9:40 am
    By injecting mesenchymal stem cells into mouse leg muscles prior to several bouts of eccentric exercise (similar to the lengthening contractions performed during resistance training in humans), researchers were able to increase the rate of repair and enhance the growth and strength of those muscles in the exercising mice.
 
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury

    23 Jul 2014 | 11:18 am
    A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists have found. In a study on rodents, researchers achieved this breakthrough by turning back the developmental clock in a molecular pathway critical to the formation of corticospinal tract nerve connections and providing a scaffold so that neuronal axons at the injury site could grow and link up again.
  • Potential genetic link between epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders

    22 Jul 2014 | 1:41 pm
    A potential link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders has been uncovered by new research. "This is, to our knowledge, the first direct genetic evidence demonstrating that mutations in the fly version of a known human epilepsy gene produce seizures through altered vesicle transport," says the senior author of the study.
  • Neuroprotective role of immune cell discovered

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:16 am
    A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to research. "Our findings suggest the innate immune system helps protect the brain after injury or during chronic disease, and this role should be further studied," the lead researcher said.
  • Epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders found

    21 Jul 2014 | 11:22 am
    Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain's prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to scientists. This epigenetic alteration of gene activity in brain cells that receive this neurotransmitter showed for the first time that dopamine deficiencies can affect a variety of behavioral and physiological functions regulated in the prefrontal cortex.
  • Enzyme linked to Alzheimer’s disease

    21 Jul 2014 | 6:59 am
    Unclogging the body’s protein disposal system may improve memory in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers.
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