Anatomy

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  • 'Milk consumption may increase risk of fractures, overall mortality'

    Bones / Orthopedics News From Medical News Today
    29 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Researchers in Sweden claim that a higher consumption of milk is not associated with a lower risk of fractures and may instead be linked with a higher rate of mortality.
  • Size matters: Baby's size at birth may predict risk for disease later in life

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    30 Oct 2014 | 8:49 am
    Being overweight might be better in the long term than being underweight, at least when it comes to infants. "These findings support the hypothesis that common long-term variation in the activity of genes established in the womb may underpin links between size at birth and risk for adult disease," said one of the authors.
  • Heart failure linked to gut bacteria compound

    Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today
    30 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    New study finds that risk of death from heart failure in patients with the condition is linked to levels of the compound TMAO - a byproduct of gut bacteria - in their blood.
  • 'Treasure in saliva' may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:44 pm
    Research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing -- at an early stage -- diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. The study, the most comprehensive analysis ever conducted of RNA molecules in human saliva, reveals that saliva contains many of the same disease-revealing molecules that are contained in blood.
  • Is math discovered or invented? TED-Ed video

    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog
    28 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Would mathematics exist if people didn't? Did we create mathematical concepts to help us understand the world around us, or is math the native language of the universe itself? Jeff Dekofsky traces some famous arguments in this ancient and hotly debated question. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
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    Anatomy News

  • Autopsy pathologist rules death of Pitt researcher's wife a homicide by cyanide poisoning

    31 Oct 2014 | 1:04 pm
    … autopsy pathologist testified Friday that the wife of a University of Pittsburgh medical researcher … disease as part of his research. Assistant District Attorney Lisa Pellegrini … between her death and a hospital blood test that first discovered …
  • Halloween: Durham University students learn about vampires and witches

    31 Oct 2014 | 10:52 am
    … curriculum for students at Durham University. A Masters course in Literature … his PhD in literature and anatomy. Speaking of the fear of … also studying with a scientist to include scientific data.” The module also …
  • Shin will be subjected to an autopsy

    31 Oct 2014 | 9:47 am
    … ’s family to approve an autopsy and, after careful consideration, they … on Monday. The medical team at Asan Medical Center where Shin was … Seoul Sky Hospital in Songpa District, southern Seoul, the same hospital where …
  • A Reminder of Scientific Progress (Past, Present and Future)

    31 Oct 2014 | 8:49 am
    … the boundaries of HIV prevention science. He's an 8-meter-high … plenary, South African Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor likened … an acronym referring to some... anatomical areas. A perfect vehicle through …
  • Psy, Others Push for Autopsy of Korean Rock Legend

    31 Oct 2014 | 8:01 am
    … K-pop icons have requested an autopsy for legendary South Korean rocker … operation, leading to accusations of medical malpractice. The late singer… strangulated hernia at Seoul Sky Hospital and was discharged the following …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Blocking a fork in the road to DNA replication

    30 Oct 2014 | 10:29 am
    A team of scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It’s a finding that could shed new light on the formation of fragile genomic regions associated with chromosomal abnormalities.
  • Size matters: Baby's size at birth may predict risk for disease later in life

    30 Oct 2014 | 8:49 am
    Being overweight might be better in the long term than being underweight, at least when it comes to infants. "These findings support the hypothesis that common long-term variation in the activity of genes established in the womb may underpin links between size at birth and risk for adult disease," said one of the authors.
  • Model explains why HIV prevention dosing differs by sex

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:15 am
    A mathematical model predicts that women must take the antiretroviral medication Truvada daily to prevent HIV infection via vaginal sex, whereas just two doses per week can protect men from HIV infection via anal sex. This finding helps explain why two large clinical trials testing HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, in women failed to show efficacy.
  • 'Treasure in saliva' may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:44 pm
    Research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing -- at an early stage -- diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. The study, the most comprehensive analysis ever conducted of RNA molecules in human saliva, reveals that saliva contains many of the same disease-revealing molecules that are contained in blood.
  • First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:43 pm
    New insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein has been released by researchers. The study produced the first detailed working image of an enzyme in a group that is associated with many types of cancer. The researchers obtained the first crystal structure of a gene-regulation enzyme working on a nucleosome. The image reveals previously unknown information about how the enzyme attaches to its nucleosome target.
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    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • Project Spotlight: MRI Scan

    roylcoblog
    14 Oct 2014 | 9:25 am
    Merge the upcoming Halloween celebration with a unit on human anatomy! The R59254 MRI Scan kit is perfect for introducing children to organs and tissues of the body. See how our art campers used critical thinking skills to put the body together!  The images are printed on clear plastic mylar sheets that can be placed on top of a lightbox or illuminated with a flashlight. Each piece forms a part of a 5′ (1.5m) MRI scan that can be assembled using the placement guides. The placement guides are miniature images of the full MRI with red markings that indicate where to arrange each piece…
  • Intention

    emilyanton
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Intention, yes Intention. Intention is what is holding my focus and attention in this moment. Stop and ask yourself: How can I have a crystal clear intention for everything I do, every action I make, every step I take, every word I speak? Life is built around our intentions.  Do you plan to succeed? Do you plan to fail? What great thing would you attempt if you knew you could not fail?” – Robert H. Schuller Every moment is filled with intention, no matter if you mean it to be or not.  And, our intentions are linked to our thoughts. Last week, I learned in a Franklin Method…
  • Womb-transplant baby phenomenon

    hquigley95
    8 Oct 2014 | 1:15 pm
    After the first successful womb-transplant effectively held and delivered a baby, more are on their way leading to a 2014/15 baby boom? Research has been going into this area for many years resulting in many failed attempt and miscarriages. The first woman to successfully receive, develop, carry and give birth to a womb transplant baby could not carry a baby herself naturally. Due to a condition of MS, multiple sclerosis her ovaries function normally. Therefore, an elderly family friend donated her uterus to the patient which could then carry her genetically own egg. There is still much…
  • Experimenting with machine stitch.

    lucyjessica
    5 Oct 2014 | 11:04 pm
  • The Bone Ages: MOSI on Down to the Manchester Science Festival, Sunday 2nd Nov 2014

    These Bones Of Mine
    3 Oct 2014 | 6:51 am
    A date for the diary for all bone and science lovers!  Skeletal researchers from the University of Sheffield and Manchester Metropolitan University will be at the Manchester Museum of Science & Industry (MOSI) on Sunday 2nd of November 2014 (from 10.30 am to 4 pm) helping to present an event called The Bone Ages to the public.  The Bone Ages will bring together the social sciences and lab based research in helping to present the wonders of studying the human skeleton, detailing how bones can teach us about the history, health and society of past populations and individuals using live…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Ocean acidification foils chemical signals

    olgaanghelici
    10 Oct 2014 | 4:15 am
    THE CRUCIAL IMPORTANCE of chemical cues to reef resettlement was elegantly demonstrated by D. L. Dix
  • Nutrition as a tool in clinical practice

    Eva Elvelin
    9 Oct 2014 | 12:35 pm
    Well, if that isn’t a beautiful sounding and attention grabbing title for a post, then I don’t know why you’re reading this. Loljksmiles, hello again. I didn’t stop blogging, I just didn’t feel inspired. But here we are! I’m now in grad school, studying nutrition. At the moment the course I’m taking is about nutrition in health and disease, and one of the lectures we had today was really motivating and engaging for me. I might have been talking a little bit too much, but in all honesty — if I’m in a classroom where nobody is answering any…
  • Prosthetic Limbs Project

    antron brown
    9 Oct 2014 | 7:32 am
    In my Anatomy and Physiology  we are starting are Prosthetic limbs project. We are forming groups  and  buying  parts for the limbs on websites like Amazon and dollar tree. We are drawing out plans of how we are going to build them. We are going to found cheap items like prices below $10. Its going to be a fun experience.
  • Cells from Insects could Create Everlasting Paint.

    entochris
    9 Oct 2014 | 12:16 am
    Durable, cheap and environmentally friendly paint may soon be on sale since scientists at the Natural History Museum in London have unlocked the key to paint that never fades, using unique cells from butterflies and other insects. The Blue Morpho butterfly, Morpho peleides, is just one of many insects that have transparent, iridescence wings created by small three-dimensional structures that alter the way light is reflected. The phenomenon is created by ‘structural colouration’. The wing is made up of transparent scales that have intricate shapes, which scatter light when it hits…
  • Arachnids: Solifugids

    Jake Buehler
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:39 pm
    This post is the fifth in an ongoing series on arachnids. Previously, this series addressed whipspid
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Which are the world's most highly-cited scientific papers of all time?

    31 Oct 2014 | 5:10 am
    Fifty years ago, Eugene Garfield published the Science Citation Index (SCI), the first systematic effort to track citations in the scientific literature. Nature’s news team wondered which were the most highly-cited papers of all time, so asked Thomson Reuters and Google for their top 100. They are not what you might think. Watson and Crick on DNA structure misses out, along with many other historic discoveries. Instead, methods and software papers dominate the lists.Find out more at nature.com/top100The discovery of high-temperature superconductors, the determination of DNA’s double-helix…
  • Top medicine articles for October 2014

    30 Oct 2014 | 6:04 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Once-weekly insulin shot - Novo Nordisk's next idea http://buff.ly/1tiUC6vHow Lufthansa Cares for Passengers' Medical Needs http://buff.ly/1pK4ILCHow scammers trick your mind - they repeatedly use one or more of the same 7 persuasion principles. Scammers have used these principles for centuries. For instance, the Nigerian email scam might seem the product of the digital age, but a version of it existed in 16th Century Europe. http://buff.ly/1rIf4jo -- Understanding scam victims: 7 principles for systems security (University…
  • Is math discovered or invented? TED-Ed video

    28 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Would mathematics exist if people didn't? Did we create mathematical concepts to help us understand the world around us, or is math the native language of the universe itself? Jeff Dekofsky traces some famous arguments in this ancient and hotly debated question. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Top medicine articles for October 2014

    24 Oct 2014 | 5:47 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Hand-grip strength is an amazingly good predictor of future rates of mortality and morbidity, or sickness http://buff.ly/1BK759H -- Hand grip strength should be considered as a vital sign useful for screening middle-aged and older adults http://buff.ly/1DglFaI -- Measuring hand-grip strength is very simple and cheap. Every primary care doctor should have a dynamometer in their office. At every visit, the doctor could check grip strength for older patients. If someone was in the 45th percentile for their age and the…
  • Multi-dose flu shot has only 25 mcg of mercury - most commercial fish contain 23 mcg of mercury per 8 ounces of fish

    21 Oct 2014 | 6:31 am
    Multi-dose flu shot has only 25 mcg of mercury - most commercial fish contain 23 mcg of mercury per 8 ounces of fish http://buff.ly/11CTRPwAre multi-dose vials less expensive?Economics are a bit complicated due to wastage with multiple vials:Single versus multi-dose vaccine vials: an economic computational modelhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20566395Most of the Western world, apart from the US, has moved on to single vials:http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/733986Whenever possible, CDC recommends that single-use vials be used and that multi-dose vials of medication be assigned to a…
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Corrigendum

    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
  • Impact of increased hematocrit on right ventricular afterload in response to chronic hypoxia

    Schreier, D. A., Hacker, T. A., Hunter, K., Eickoff, J., Liu, A., Song, G., Chesler, N.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Chronic hypoxia causes chronic mountain sickness through hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) and increased hematocrit. Here, we investigated the impact of increased hematocrit and HPH on right ventricular (RV) afterload via pulmonary vascular impedance. Mice were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen) for 10 (10H) or 21 days (21H). After baseline hemodynamic measurements, ~500 μl of blood were extracted and replaced with an equal volume of hydroxyethylstarch to normalize hematocrit and all hemodynamic measurements were repeated. In addition, ~500 μl of blood were…
  • Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure

    Cour, M., Abrial, M., Jahandiez, V., Loufouat, J., Belaidi, E., Gharib, A., Varennes, A., Monneret, G., Thibault, H., Ovize, M., Argaud, L.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA…
  • Systemic stiffening of mouse tail tendon is related to dietary advanced glycation end products but not high-fat diet or cholesterol

    Eriksen, C., Svensson, R. B., Scheijen, J., Hag, A. M. F., Schalkwijk, C., Praet, S. F. E., Schjerling, P., Kjaer, M., Magnusson, S. P., Couppe, C.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Tendon pathology is related to metabolic disease and mechanical overloading, but the effect of metabolic disease on tendon mechanics is unknown. This study investigated the effect of diet and apolipoprotein E deficiency (ApoE–/–) on mechanical properties and advanced glycation end product (AGE) cross-linking of non-weight-bearing mouse tail tendons. Twenty ApoE–/– male mice were used as a model for hypercholesterolemia along with 26 wild-type (WT) mice. One-half of the mice from each group was fed a normal diet (ND) and the other half was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to…
  • TrkB kinase activity maintains synaptic function and structural integrity at adult neuromuscular junctions

    Mantilla, C. B., Stowe, J. M., Sieck, D. C., Ermilov, L. G., Greising, S. M., Zhang, C., Shokat, K. M., Sieck, G. C.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Activation of the tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) by brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely regulates synaptic transmission at adult neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The role of TrkB kinase activity in the maintenance of NMJ function and structure at diaphragm muscle NMJs was explored using a chemical-genetic approach that permits reversible inactivation of TrkB kinase activity in TrkBF616A mice by 1NMPP1. Inhibiting TrkB kinase activity for 7 days resulted in significant, yet reversible, impairments in neuromuscular transmission at diaphragm NMJs. Neuromuscular transmission…
 
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    Digestive System News

  • 5 Tips for a Healthier Gut

    31 Oct 2014 | 12:42 pm
    … gut is important for a multitude of reasons – nutrient absorption, symptom-free digestion … , preventing “leaky gut” guards against … gut health. 1.    Avoid Gut Irritants Antibiotics top the list for impairing gut health … blend targeting gut health, which, in …
  • Alabaster woman undergoes latest surgery to treat 'paralyzed stomach' symptoms

    31 Oct 2014 | 10:11 am
    … billing director for a healthcare provider, suffers from a … Clinic, which specializes in digestive diseases, that doctors hope … gastric transplant of her stomach, intestine and pancreas. Her … stay in her stomach. Doctors found part of her digestive system …
  • Dr Le Fanu's online health clinic, Friday 31st October 2014

    31 Oct 2014 | 8:44 am
    … stomach, constant burping, loose bowels. I had numerous tests on my stomach … have any symptoms. Routine bowel cancer screening in April … Leeds I too had dreadful digestive problems on using Duraphat … , bought at the local health food shop. My hygienist …
  • Halloween lantern leftovers with health-giving benefits

    31 Oct 2014 | 3:41 am
    … lining the respiratory and digestive tracts, and so helps … they help with joint health, organ health, stress relief and … also help keep your digestive system running smoothly. Pumpkin … , protect against arthritis, promote healthy skin, and improve brain …
  • The health benefits of whole grain oats: new scientific review

    31 Oct 2014 | 12:50 am
    … quality and digestive, cardiovascular and general metabolic health. In the … That May Contribute to Digestive Health Whole grains are … polyphenols, avenanthramides, may benefit gut health and that resistant starch … in some cases of bowel disease (one of two …
 
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    Stomach News

  • Alabaster woman undergoes latest surgery to treat 'paralyzed stomach' symptoms

    31 Oct 2014 | 10:11 am
    … ;a paralyzed stomach." "When you eat, your stomach breaks all … that food sits in that stomach and basically rots. There… three-part gastric transplant of her stomach, intestine and pancreas. Her journey … October 2012, they removed the stomach pouch and attached the esophagus …
  • Tate Publishing and Author Mel Riebe Talk Book Deal for 2014!

    30 Oct 2014 | 3:49 pm
    Baltimore, MD - Tate Publishing would be honored to work with author Mel Reibe as he shares his personal testimony about living with epilepsy. BALTIMORE, MD, USA, October 30, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Director of Book Acquisitions, Stacy Baker said, “ …
  • How simple stomach pains can take you to hell and back

    30 Oct 2014 | 3:27 pm
    … thought, it’s only a stomach ache. What’s the big … ? But these were no ordinary stomach aches. Instead her pains were …
  • Tiny Stomachs Grown in the Lab

    30 Oct 2014 | 1:55 pm
    … Scientists have successfully grown miniature stomachs in the lab from human … used to grow the mini stomachs are pluripotent, or plastic: given … . Stomach switch The key to turning pluripotent stem cells into stomach cells … remarkably similar to an actual stomach”, says study leader James Wells …
  • Stem Cells Used To Make Mini Human Stomach

    30 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Scientists have been able to grow many different kinds of body parts and organs from stem cells. And now, researchers from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, working with the Universit
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Heart's own immune cells can help it heal

    30 Oct 2014 | 12:06 pm
    The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research. In a mouse model of heart failure, the researchers showed that blocking the bone marrow's macrophages from entering the heart protects the organ's beneficial pool of macrophages, allowing them to remain in the heart, where they promote regeneration and recovery. The findings may have implications for treating heart failure in humans.
  • Why scratching makes you itch more

    30 Oct 2014 | 10:29 am
    Turns out your mom was right: scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research reveals that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. Scientists uncovered serotonin's role in controlling pain decades ago, but this is the first time the release of the chemical messenger from the brain has been linked to itch, they say.
  • Even mild depressive symptoms result in poorer lumbar spinal stenosis surgery outcome

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    Even mild depressive symptoms can weaken the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis surgery, according to a recent study. Patients with depressive symptoms had a weaker functional capacity post-surgery even five years after surgery. "The results indicate that attention should be paid to even mild depressive symptoms both before and after the surgery. This would allow health care professionals to recognize patients who might benefit from enhanced psychosocial support as part of their surgery-related treatment and rehabilitation process," says the first author.
  • Reconstruction of patterned piece of spinal cord in 3D culture

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:12 am
    The central nervous system in vertebrates develops from the neural tube, which is the basis for the differentiation in spinal cord and brain. Researchers have demonstrated for the first time the in vitro growth of a piece of spinal cord in three dimensions from mouse embryonic stem cells. Correct spatial organization of motor neurons, interneurons and dorsal interneurons along the dorsal/ventral axis was observed.
  • Adult eczema may be unrecognized risk factor for fracture, other injuries

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:42 pm
    Adults with eczema had a higher prevalence of fracture and bone or joint injury, as well as other types of injury-causing limitations, in a nationally representative sample of patients with a history of the chronic inflammatory disorder that can cause skin itching and result in sleep disturbance, according to a study.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Heart's own immune cells can help it heal

    30 Oct 2014 | 12:06 pm
    The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research. In a mouse model of heart failure, the researchers showed that blocking the bone marrow's macrophages from entering the heart protects the organ's beneficial pool of macrophages, allowing them to remain in the heart, where they promote regeneration and recovery. The findings may have implications for treating heart failure in humans.
  • Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    Bacteria in the GI tract fulfill many vital functions and are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory responses by the immune system if they penetrate the gut and enter the bloodstream. Prior research has established the involvement of inflammatory processes in the development of psychiatric disorders, including major depression and alcohol dependence, but the origins of such inflammation have remained unclear. Now, researchers have found that inflammatory pathways are stimulated in alcohol-dependent patients by bacteria that escape the gut barrier,…
  • Validation of patient reported outcomes obtained in the home infusion setting in the management of patients with neuromuscular disease

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:05 am
    New information about how to monitor medications given at home has been provided by the results of new research. Many autoimmune neuromuscular disorders, such as Myasthenia Gravis, myositis, and CIDP, require the use of medications to suppress the immune system, such as IVIg. However, these medications must be given through infusions and are expensive when taken on a regular basis.
  • Bacteria are hard-wired for survival, E. coli study suggests

    29 Oct 2014 | 11:56 am
    Some bacteria are able to thrive even when under continued attack, scientists have found, in a development that may help explain how our immune systems can't always prevent infections. The team studied how E. coli responded when its DNA strands were deliberately broken as it tried to carry out its everyday function of dividing and reproducing.
  • In autoimmune diseases affecting millions, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits

    29 Oct 2014 | 11:12 am
    Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans -- ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma -- mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments.
 
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Why scratching makes you itch more

    30 Oct 2014 | 10:29 am
    Turns out your mom was right: scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research reveals that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation. Scientists uncovered serotonin's role in controlling pain decades ago, but this is the first time the release of the chemical messenger from the brain has been linked to itch, they say.
  • Reconstruction of patterned piece of spinal cord in 3D culture

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:12 am
    The central nervous system in vertebrates develops from the neural tube, which is the basis for the differentiation in spinal cord and brain. Researchers have demonstrated for the first time the in vitro growth of a piece of spinal cord in three dimensions from mouse embryonic stem cells. Correct spatial organization of motor neurons, interneurons and dorsal interneurons along the dorsal/ventral axis was observed.
  • Lou Gehrig's disease study: Renewing brain's aging support cells may help neurons survive

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:05 am
    Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. Now ALS researchers know the effects of the attack are worsened, at least in part, by the aging and failure of support cells called astrocytes, which normally provide nutrients, housekeeping, structure and other forms of assistance for neurons.
  • Possible cause of common dementia found, opening avenues for treatment

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:05 am
    A major cause of dementia has been potentially discovered, scientists report. In the type of dementia studied, there is damage to the white matter (nerve fibres) of the brain apparent on computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of older individuals.
  • Nano ruffles in brain matter

    29 Oct 2014 | 6:52 am
    Researchers have deciphered the role of nanostructures around brain cells in the central nervous system. An accumulation of a protein called amyloid-beta into large insoluble deposits called plaques is known to cause Alzheimer's disease. One aspect of this illness that has not received much attention is which role the structure of the brain environment plays. How do macromolecules and macromolecular assemblies, such as polysaccharides, influence cell interaction in the brain?
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