Anatomy

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  • Epigenomic changes are key to innate immunological memory

    Immune System / Vaccines News From Medical News Today
    1 Sep 2015 | 10:00 am
    It was long believed that acquired immunity--a type of immunity mediated by T- and B-cells--had memory, meaning that it could learn from new pathogens, making subsequent reactions more effective...
  • Growth hormone reduces risk of osteoporosis fractures in older women

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    27 Aug 2015 | 11:19 am
    For years after it was administered, growth hormone continued to reduce the risk of fractures and helped maintain bone density in postmenopausal women who had osteoporosis.
  • Diabetes linked to bone health

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Aug 2015 | 11:17 am
    A link between diabetes and bone health has been found by researchers. Clinical trials have revealed a startling elevation in fracture risk in diabetic patients, the investigators note.
  • Human Anatomy, Media Update by Jon B. Mallatt, Elaine N. Marieb and Patricia...

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    elizawragg
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:13 am
    Human Anatomy, Media Update by Jon B. Mallatt, Elaine N. Marieb and Patricia… http://admirable-extraordinary-deal.buy2day.info/buy002/01/?query=131588819089
  • The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension

    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue
    Ogoh, S., Hirasawa, A., Sugawara, J., Nakahara, H., Ueda, S., Shoemaker, J. K., Miyamoto, T.
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:30 am
    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately…
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Study identifies potential genes associated with most common form of liver damage

    1 Sep 2015 | 1:12 pm
    In a first-of-its-kind exploratory study, researchers identified a potential gene associated with the initiation of the most common cause of liver damage. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver damage. In this study, the scientists sequenced microRNAs from liver biopsies, spelling out their biochemical molecules to identify several potential gene targets associated with NAFLD-related liver damage.
  • Studying the outliers: Researchers discover a gene variant that provides a delaying mechanism for Alzheimer's disease

    1 Sep 2015 | 11:07 am
    Medical research has yet to discover an Alzheimer's treatment that effectively slows the disease's progression, but neuroscientists may have uncovered a mechanism by which onset can be delayed by as much as 10 years.
  • DNA division can slow to a halt

    1 Sep 2015 | 9:08 am
    A key mystery of the DNA replication process has been unraveled by researchers, resolving a long-standing mystery that has clouded our understanding of DNA replication, and also has important implications for all domains of life.
  • Genetic cause of unknown disease uncovered

    1 Sep 2015 | 9:08 am
    The genetic cause of a previously undescribed disease has been discovered by researchers. With this, they have solved an over ten year old medical conundrum. Using modern high-tech methods, followed by thorough clinical, biochemical and molecular biological investigations, the researchers found the causative mutation and characterized the disease which is given the name RCDP5.
  • Simply turn off a virus: Scientists develop new method for detailed investigation of functional RNA elements

    1 Sep 2015 | 8:48 am
    A new method has been developed for studying the function of ribonucleic acid (RNA) that provides more detailed results, is more cost-effective, as well as easier to work with than previous methods. So-called functional RNA is important for almost all cells and cellular processes, for example, by binding proteins or performing catalytic processes.
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    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • CRYDER'S 2A: (UNIT 1) LAB EXERCISES- ATTN. STUDENTS-: (Please PRINT EACH ATTACHMENT and bring to class).

    MyAnatomyMentor
    1 Sep 2015 | 3:40 am
    Answers Cover Page (9) Cell Transport (6) DNA-RNA Structure & Function (5) Cell Cycle (4) The Cell (3) Measurement (2) Microscope (1) Medical Terminology
  • Painter 2016 & Drawing Humans

    kcorym
    28 Aug 2015 | 3:25 pm
    So I’ve just upgraded to Corel Painter 2016, and in some respects I can already tell it’s more stable and faster than 2015. I found an issue with the latter concerning crashes upon opening the program. I found this possibly something to do with creating your own brush categories and customisation and after a while the program would start crashing upon start-up. This became kind of annoying and it forced me to have to use the pre-set brushes and only minutely change them to the settings I want; I had to repeat this every time I opened Painter. Hopefully though Painter 2016 is a…
  • A Date with My Uvula

    strai8tok
    28 Aug 2015 | 2:22 am
    So there is this ting called Uvula. That dangly thing in the back of any human being’s throat with no specific function. Usually you will find it sloppily hanging atop the throat with a snapback on and some Js and a toothpick in its mouth, just like some hard-core ol skool nigga or some 44 or 45 tout. Well minding its own business assuming that everything is all right and it should be there because it is its democratic right. For a long time I thought, Ok, just like the appendix may be they are extras without any specific role, you know like those TVs in TV studios and they should be left…
  • Human Anatomy, Media Update by Jon B. Mallatt, Elaine N. Marieb and Patricia...

    elizawragg
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:13 am
    Human Anatomy, Media Update by Jon B. Mallatt, Elaine N. Marieb and Patricia… http://admirable-extraordinary-deal.buy2day.info/buy002/01/?query=131588819089
  • CRYDER'S: AMY 2A (FALL 2015) COURSE SYLLABUS

    MyAnatomyMentor
    25 Aug 2015 | 11:57 am
    CRYDERS 2A FALL SYLLABUS 2015
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Meeting Invites

    nadeemraj
    1 Sep 2015 | 11:08 am
    As he ran his fingers through his hair once again, it suddenly struck him that he had been engaged i
  • Cystic Fibrosis: A Trilogy of Biochemistry, Physiology, and Therapy (Subject Col

    eileentempleman
    1 Sep 2015 | 1:00 am
    Cystic Fibrosis: A Trilogy of Biochemistry, Physiology, and Therapy (Subject Col http://luxuriant-attractive-products.buy2day.info/buy002/01/?query=331643097670
  • Never enough time. 

    iamukulwa
    31 Aug 2015 | 1:04 pm
    I finally started studying for physiology and I honestly do not see myself finishing before the test on Friday. I know what you’re thinking, I should have started a long time ago! Well yes, I should have, but there’s this thing called time and I never seem to have enough of it. My schedule for the last couple of weeks has been such that I have a week between tests, at most, and a week is not enough for any of the subjects that I’ve written. Luckily this phys test only has two sections, as apposed to the six sections that I had to write about 3 weeks ago. I have started…
  • Relaxing can release the handbrake on your fat loss

    Rick McIlwaine
    30 Aug 2015 | 6:02 am
    Burning fat and losing weight is not rocket science, but at the same time, it is not exactly a walk in the park. Some of the major keys to effective fat loss include a rigorous training routine, a clean diet with enough protein intake to fuel muscle growth and 7-9 hours of sleep every night. These are not the only factors to consider however. There are 4 steroid hormones that body-builders are concerned with when building muscle and burning fat, and you should be aware of them also. Testosterone Human growth hormone (HGH) Insulin Cortisol The first three of the above hormones are anabolic in…
  • idiosyncratically-defined, 30th August 2015

    Robert Greig
    30 Aug 2015 | 12:07 am
    my temperature-regulation is all over the place this morning….. muscle so tired… it happens……. just the way it is, we all have our little physical idiosyncrasies…… two of mine being Raynauds, as regular readers will already know, and fatigue…. oh yes, fatigue as a condition is a real thing…… and it’s not just ‘feeling a bit tired’………. tea, I need more tea… my freshly-made pot is still fresh…….. always take the time to make a proper cup of tea from a proper pot of tea……. this…
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Healthcare social media #HCSM - top articles

    1 Sep 2015 | 7:16 am
    Here are my suggestions for some of the top articles related to healthcare social media (#HCSM) in the past 4-8 weeks:Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum - Annals of Emergency Medicine http://buff.ly/1CcfgM9Collaborative Economy Honeycomb http://bit.ly/1zoBreN - Not many companies in healthcare/wellness... Risks in Using Social Media to Spot Signs of Mental Distress - NYTimes http://nyti.ms/1xYFumq -- NIH committed $11 million to support studies into using Twitter and Facebook to better understand substance abuse. Classification algorithm predicts whether a…
  • "Bio-detection" dogs in trial to be used for prostate cancer sniffing

    29 Aug 2015 | 5:56 am
    Many urologists agree that the PSA test for detecting prostate cancer is often unreliable, but it remains widely used because there are no other relatively inexpensive tests. Researchers in Britain say this method may soon be replaced with dogs trained to sniff out the type of cancer that, according to the American Cancer Society, affects one in every 7 men. VOA’s George Putic reports:It takes 6 months to train a dog to detect prostate cancer. According to the report, trained dogs can detect prostate tumors in urine in 93 percent of cases."These dogs have the ability to screen hundreds of…
  • All about hair loss (alopecia) - Deutsche Welle expert interview

    28 Aug 2015 | 5:02 am
    Dr. Andreas Finner (Trichomed Praxis Berlin) talks about what everyone can do to keep a full head of hair and about the best methods for treating hair loss:Today's Hair-Loss Treatments: DrugsMinoxidil shampooPatients can buy an OTC shampoo with an ingredient called minoxidil. Minoxidil (Rogaine) fights androgenic alopecia in both men and women. It's still not entirely clear how minoxidil works. Used properly -- twice a day, massaged deep into the scalp -- it slows new hair loss. Two-thirds of men do get acceptable hair growth. "It is not something a bald person would use, but someone starting…
  • Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    Hidradenitis suppurativa, also known as acne inversa, is a chronic skin disease characterized by recurrent boil-like lumps (nodules) under the skin. Hidradenitis suppurativa was once thought to be a rare condition because only the most severe cases were reported. However, recent studies have shown that the condition affects at least 1 in 100 people when milder cases are also considered. There are three levels in the management of hidradenitis suppurativa: - topical options- systemic options- surgical methods including laser therapyDr. Christian Baum, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist, takes a look…
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome animation

    11 Aug 2015 | 8:02 am
    NHSChoices: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a condition that causes pain, numbness and a burning or tingling sensation in the hand and fingers. Watch this animation and find out what the carpal tunnel is and what causes CTS.http://youtu.be/F3VryalTK14 Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Recording of intracranial pressure in conscious rats via telemetry

    Guild, S.-J., McBryde, F. D., Malpas, S. C.
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:30 am
    Although cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is known to be fundamental in the control of normal brain function, there have been no previous long-term measurements in animal models. The aim of this study was to explore the stability and viability of long-term recordings of intracranial pressure (ICP) in freely moving rats via a telemetry device. We also developed a repeatable surgical approach with a solid-state pressure sensor at the tip of the catheter placed under the dura and in combination with arterial pressure (AP) measurement to enable the calculation of CPP. Telemeters with dual…
  • Positional differences in reactive hyperemia provide insight into initial phase of exercise hyperemia

    Jasperse, J. L., Shoemaker, J. K., Gray, E. J., Clifford, P. S.
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:30 am
    Studies have reported a greater blood flow response to muscle contractions when the limb is below the heart compared with above the heart, and these results have been interpreted as evidence for a skeletal muscle pump contribution to exercise hyperemia. If limb position affects the blood flow response to other vascular challenges such as reactive hyperemia, this interpretation may not be correct. We hypothesized that the magnitude of reactive hyperemia would be greater with the limb below the heart. Brachial artery blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and blood pressure (finger-cuff…
  • Mapping of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of plantar flexor muscle activity during isometric contraction: correlation of velocity-encoded MRI with EMG

    Csapo, R., Malis, V., Sinha, U., Sinha, S.
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:30 am
    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between contraction-associated muscle kinematics as measured by velocity-encoded phase-contrast (VE-PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and activity recorded via electromyography (EMG), and to construct a detailed three-dimensional (3-D) map of the contractile behavior of the triceps surae complex from the MRI data. Ten axial-plane VE-PC MRI slices of the triceps surae and EMG data were acquired during submaximal isometric contractions in 10 subjects. MRI images were analyzed to yield the degree of contraction-associated muscle displacement…
  • An experimental comparison of the relative benefits of work and torque assistance in ankle exoskeletons

    Jackson, R. W., Collins, S. H.
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:30 am
    Techniques proposed for assisting locomotion with exoskeletons have often included a combination of active work input and passive torque support, but the physiological effects of different assistance techniques remain unclear. We performed an experiment to study the independent effects of net exoskeleton work and average exoskeleton torque on human locomotion. Subjects wore a unilateral ankle exoskeleton and walked on a treadmill at 1.25 m·s–1 while net exoskeleton work rate was systematically varied from –0.054 to 0.25 J·kg–1·s–1, with constant…
  • The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension

    Ogoh, S., Hirasawa, A., Sugawara, J., Nakahara, H., Ueda, S., Shoemaker, J. K., Miyamoto, T.
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:30 am
    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately…
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Completely paralyzed man voluntarily moves his legs, scientists report

    1 Sep 2015 | 5:48 pm
    A 39-year-old man who had had been completely paralyzed for four years was able to voluntarily control his leg muscles and take thousands of steps in a robotic device during five days of training with the aid of the robotic device combined with a novel noninvasive spinal stimulation pattern that does not require surgery, a team of scientists reports.
  • Big differences in U.S. healthcare costs for fixing back pain

    1 Sep 2015 | 9:10 am
    How much does spinal fusion surgery cost? The answer depends on what part of the country you live in, reports a study. The researchers analyzed 2012 Medicare data on the costs of two common types of spinal fusion surgery: anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and posterior lumbar fusion (PLF). These two operations are widely performed in patients with patients with pain and/or instability in the upper (ACDF) and lower (PLF) spine.
  • Lack of folic acid enrichment in Europe causes mortality among fetuses

    28 Aug 2015 | 7:22 am
    A new international study shows that 5,000 fetuses in Europe annually are affected by spina bifida and other severe defects on the central nervous system. Seventy percent of these pregnancies are terminated, while increased mortality and serious diseases affect the children who are born. At least half of the cases can be avoided by adding folic acid to staple foods as is already being done in 70 non-European countries.
  • Growth hormone reduces risk of osteoporosis fractures in older women

    27 Aug 2015 | 11:19 am
    For years after it was administered, growth hormone continued to reduce the risk of fractures and helped maintain bone density in postmenopausal women who had osteoporosis.
  • Diabetes linked to bone health

    21 Aug 2015 | 11:17 am
    A link between diabetes and bone health has been found by researchers. Clinical trials have revealed a startling elevation in fracture risk in diabetic patients, the investigators note.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Lupus: A disease with many faces

    1 Sep 2015 | 8:37 am
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease with so many different symptoms that it is often difficult to diagnose and to treat. Despite huge medical advances over the last few years, lupus is incurable. Modern, individually tailored therapeutic approaches are aimed at helping sufferers.
  • Closer to a treatment for 'asthma of the esophagus'

    31 Aug 2015 | 9:32 am
    Scientists have elucidated the chemical process behind a mysterious gastrointestinal disease that is becoming more frequent every day: the eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), also known as the 'asthma of the esophagus'. The researchers identified a molecule which plays a key role in this condition and that can be a target in a new therapeutic strategy.
  • 'Eat me' signal whets appetites for tumor-devouring dendritic cells

    31 Aug 2015 | 9:03 am
    The therapeutic effect of CD47 blockade as a cancer treatment relies more on dendritic cells than macrophages, scientists report. Anti-CD47-mediated tumor rejection will require both innate and adaptive responses.
  • Epigenomic changes are key to innate immunological memory

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:25 am
    Epigenomic changes induced by pathogen infections, mediated by a transcription factor called ATF7, are the underlying mechanism of the memory of innate immunity, new research shows.
  • Scientists identify possible key in virus, cancer research

    27 Aug 2015 | 12:44 pm
    Scientists have uncovered a viral protein in the cell that inhibits the major DNA sensor and thus the body's response to viral infection, suggesting that this cellular pathway could be manipulated to help a person fight infection, cancer or autoimmune diseases.
 
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