Anatomy

  • Most Topular Stories

  • In a role reversal, RNAs proofread themselves

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Jan 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Building a protein is a lot like a game of telephone: information is passed along from one messenger to another, creating the potential for errors. Enzymatic machines proofread at each step, and scientists have uncovered a new quality control mechanism along this path. But in a remarkable role reversal, the proofreading isn't done by an enzyme. Instead, one of the messengers itself has a built-in mechanism to prevent errors.
  • Genetically engineered antibody-based molecules show enhanced hiv-fighting abilities

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Jan 2015 | 10:29 am
    Capitalizing on a new insight into HIV's strategy for evading antibodies -- proteins produced by the immune system to identify and wipe out invading objects such as viruses -- researchers have developed antibody-based molecules that are more than 100 times better than our bodies' own defenses at binding to and neutralizing HIV, when tested in vitro. The work suggests a novel approach that could be used to engineer more effective HIV-fighting drugs.
  • The Science of Fat

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    vivimae
    24 Jan 2015 | 7:51 am
    Our society is one where skinny people are idolized and fat people are stigmatized. I’ve previously explored the history of fat, speculating that, at various points in our history, fat was actually idealized. Fat, in days of yore, often meant that you had the money and the means to support yourself to excess – you were rich enough to afford enough food to get fat, while most of the population starved. In the 1800s, for example, people ate tea and cake and little delicacies all the time – high tea is packed full of sugary snacks precisely because of this (and also, women had corsets).
  • Both weight loss and weight gain linked with increased fracture risk

    Bones / Orthopedics News From Medical News Today
    28 Jan 2015 | 12:00 am
    Both weight gain and weight loss in older (postmenopausal) women are associated with increased incidence of fracture, but at different anatomical sites, finds a study published in The BMJ.
  • Beer compound could help fend off Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    28 Jan 2015 | 8:39 am
    The health-promoting perks of wine have attracted the spotlight recently, leaving beer in the shadows. But scientists are discovering new ways in which the latter could be a more healthful beverage than once thought. It turns out that a compound from hops could protect brain cells from damage -- and potentially slow the development of disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:18 am
    'Bio-molecular interaction analysis, a cornerstone of biomedical research, is traditionally accomplished using equipment that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars,' said the senior author of a new study. 'Rather than develop a new instrument, we've created a nanoscale tool made from strands of DNA that can detect and report how molecules behave, enabling biological measurements to be made by almost anyone, using only common and inexpensive laboratory reagents.'
  • Hot on the trail of hepatitis-liver cancer connection

    30 Jan 2015 | 5:15 am
    Using whole genomic sequencing, scientists have for the first time demonstrated the profound effect that chronic hepatitis infection and inflammation can have on the genetic mutations found in tumors of the liver, potentially paving the way to a better understanding of the mechanisms through which these chronic infections can lead to cancer. Primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and recent studies have shown that particularly in Asia, infection with either hepatitis B or C is often associated with such cancers.
  • Powerful tool promises to change the way scientists view proteins

    29 Jan 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Life scientists now have access to a publicly available web resource that streamlines and simplifies the process of gleaning insight from 3-D protein structures. Aquaria, as it's known, is fast, easy-to-use and contains twice as many models as all other similar resources combined.
  • In a role reversal, RNAs proofread themselves

    29 Jan 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Building a protein is a lot like a game of telephone: information is passed along from one messenger to another, creating the potential for errors. Enzymatic machines proofread at each step, and scientists have uncovered a new quality control mechanism along this path. But in a remarkable role reversal, the proofreading isn't done by an enzyme. Instead, one of the messengers itself has a built-in mechanism to prevent errors.
  • Genetically engineered antibody-based molecules show enhanced hiv-fighting abilities

    29 Jan 2015 | 10:29 am
    Capitalizing on a new insight into HIV's strategy for evading antibodies -- proteins produced by the immune system to identify and wipe out invading objects such as viruses -- researchers have developed antibody-based molecules that are more than 100 times better than our bodies' own defenses at binding to and neutralizing HIV, when tested in vitro. The work suggests a novel approach that could be used to engineer more effective HIV-fighting drugs.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • A Day in the Dissection Rooms

    danniellearc
    30 Jan 2015 | 8:23 am
    The opportunity for me to observe a human dissection class a King’s College University, London, was initially daunting. Not only had I heard the horror stories and warnings of how students attend such events only to vomit, faint or collapse, in all honesty I had never been in an environment surrounded by that level of morbidity. As a happy beginning to this read, I will confirm not only did I not feel the need to vomit, faint or collapse, but I left assured in my ability to stomach what some may deem quite a disturbing site – and rather worryingly, very ready for some lunch. For those who…
  • That's so rad: Identifying and siding the radius

    JB
    30 Jan 2015 | 7:16 am
    The radius is a double-edged sword. No, no, that’s not what I meant. The radius is a double-ed
  • CRYDER'S: LECTURE NOTES on UNIT 3 EXAM (SKELETAL)

    MyAnatomyMentor
    28 Jan 2015 | 7:32 am
    Spinal Cord Cross-section 5 zone sequenceCALCIUM REGULATION MECHANISMSlecture notes bone remodeling and hormones
  • Anatomical Accessories by Konstantin Kofta

    Jenna-Mae Bilmer
    25 Jan 2015 | 10:20 am
    Fashion is one of the most common forms of self expression. What better way to say who you are than not having to speak at all and letting your clothing speak for you? For some of us, we find comfort in a uniform (I’ll expand more on this in another post) and others find that same comfort in dressing zany. The audience who will wear Konstantin Kofta’s creations doesn’t fit in either demographic, yet maybe the latter would be daring enough to carry these bookbags. The Kiev-based designer has created accessories that are inspired by human anatomy. I find the human body to be…
  • The Science of Fat

    vivimae
    24 Jan 2015 | 7:51 am
    Our society is one where skinny people are idolized and fat people are stigmatized. I’ve previously explored the history of fat, speculating that, at various points in our history, fat was actually idealized. Fat, in days of yore, often meant that you had the money and the means to support yourself to excess – you were rich enough to afford enough food to get fat, while most of the population starved. In the 1800s, for example, people ate tea and cake and little delicacies all the time – high tea is packed full of sugary snacks precisely because of this (and also, women had corsets).
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • What Happens Inside a Cocoon?

    Nancy
    14 Jan 2015 | 9:52 pm
    Well, there’s quite a lot to cover here! So lets get to it! Click for full size This is a grea
  • What to do if you are shot

    IvyMikeCafe
    14 Jan 2015 | 7:05 pm
    IvyMikeCafe:A little something from MinimalMed, a name you’ll be seeing around here a bunch. O
  • কিভাবে পড়বো ফিজিওলোজি?

    Faisal Abdullah
    14 Jan 2015 | 3:24 pm
    পড়া হবে রিপিটেটিভ।বেশ কয়েকবার বেশ কয়েকভাবে পড়তে হবে। পড়তে হবে টেক্সটবুক।মেইনলি গাইটন। ১।বুঝার জন্যে
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson on Surviving in Space without a...

    scientiflix
    14 Jan 2015 | 2:52 pm
    Neil deGrasse Tyson on Surviving in Space without a Spacesuit Planning a tour of the solar system? Neil deGrasse Tyson describes what would happen to you if you were to visit the Sun and planets without a spacesuit to protect you from their environments. (Spoiler Alert: He skips Pluto.) Enjoy this video from Business Insider and StarTalk Radio. By: StarTalk Radio.
  • 09742147630 @ PG MD MS Admission in India 2015 through Management Quota | Karnataka | Maharastra

    Admissions Management/NRI Quota
    14 Jan 2015 | 11:04 am
    PG MD MS Admission in India 2015 through Management Quota “PG MD MS Admission in India Top colleges 2015 Through Management Quota” We provide admission guidance in Pg MD, Ms, and MDS & MBBS in Private Medical Colleges in India Admission in MD MS in Top Medical Colleges in India through Management Quota. PG, MS, MD Admission in India is going on for 2015-2016 Batch. Direct Admission in MD , MS , MDS , MBBS in India (Maharashtra , Madhya Pradesh , Karnataka) through Management Quota MD MS Admissions 2015 Open in Maharashtra (Nagpur, Pune, and Mumbai) Madhya Pradesh (Bhopal, Indore &…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Sparring Injuries

    30 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    Martial arts instructor Jake Mace tells the story behind his scar and arm fracture: Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • How to Engage Doctors in the Healthcare Reform - Practical Advice from Cleveland Clinic CEO

    29 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    CEO & President, Dr. Toby Cosgrove reflects on Engaging Doctors in the Healthcare Revolution:From the article in Harvard Business Review (http://bit.ly/1y1iyOI): "Fixing health care will require a radical transformation, moving from a system organized around individual physicians to a team-based approach focused on patients. Doctors, of course, must be central players in the transformation: Any ambitious strategy that they do not embrace is doomed.And yet, many physicians are deeply anxious about the changes under way and are mourning real or anticipated losses of autonomy, respect, and…
  • "Walk the walk to talk the talk" - Cleveland Clinic video

    27 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    CCF leaders are running two innovative "walk in my shoes" programs to take Cleveland Clinic to the next level. This involves learning how to do everyone's job, hands-on. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Exam preparation: NEJM Knowledge+ Adaptive Learning Explained

    25 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    "At the heart of NEJM Knowledge+ is a smart, adaptive engine that will transform your learning experience. This adaptive learning platform quickly assesses the subjects you know well, and identifies the areas where you need reinforcement. It then delivers more of what you need and less of what you already know, continually adjusting based on your performance. Adaptive learning ensures that you’ll spend your time efficiently, focusing on what you need to learn and review.Take a look at how adaptive learning helps you tackle the challenges of lifelong learning and board preparation. Learn…
  • Adult acne: how to treat it?

    24 Jan 2015 | 12:32 pm
    A Mayo Clinic dermatologist gives tips on how adults can prevent and treat acne. Treatment options include over the counter medications as well as prescription medications.Acne has 3 stages that can be remembered by the mnemonic "CIN":Comedonal - black/whitehead, open/closedInflammatory - pimples/zitsNodulocysticUse Topical Treatment such as Differin gel as on CCC-F: Cheek, Chin, Cheek, Forehead Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
 
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Digestive System News

  • Stacy Keibler loves bone broth: Low-carb Paleo diet, Pilates aided weight loss

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:19 am
    … helps heal and seal your gut, promoting healthy digestion. And the gelatin in … diet emphasizes high-quality animal proteins, healthy fats, non-starchy vegetables, and excludes …
  • Stacy Keilber flaunts abs: Low-carb Paleo diet, Pilates are weight loss secrets

    30 Jan 2015 | 10:10 am
    … helps heal and seal your gut, promoting healthy digestion. And the gelatin in … diet emphasizes high-quality animal proteins, healthy fats, non-starchy vegetables, and excludes …
  • How to keep your liver healthy

    30 Jan 2015 | 9:47 am
    … filtration of blood from the digestive tract, detoxification of chemicals … modification tips for liver health: Stop smoking and limit … Eat a healthy diet and drink water adequately. Health experts recommend … on age, sex and health status but the minimum …
  • Can a 3 day Cleanse Keep You Healthy All Year Long?

    30 Jan 2015 | 7:56 am
    … - including the immune, digestive, detoxification and nervous systems … defense are in the gut. Natural body detoxification has … , not on an empty stomach because this will cause … your digestive tract in tip-top shape, thus contributing to optimal health …
  • 10 Key Reasons to Attend Asthma & COPD 2015

    30 Jan 2015 | 3:09 am
    SMi’s 11th annual conference on Asthma & COPD will take place on the 13th – 14th April 2015 in London, UK. LONDON, ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM, January 30, 2015 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Top 10 Reasons to Attend Asthma & COPD 2015 Include: 1. …
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Outbreak of rare respiratory virus could be linked with paralysis in 12 Colorado children

    29 Jan 2015 | 6:42 am
    A cluster of children from Colorado in the USA have been treated for muscle weakness or paralysis that may be connected to a nationwide outbreak of a usually rare respiratory virus called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses, experts report.
  • Why upper motor neurons degenerate in ALS

    28 Jan 2015 | 11:19 am
    Scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of the upper motor neurons that die in ALS, and developed a model system that will allow further research on the degeneration.
  • New model for preserving donor tissue will allow more natural joint repair for patients

    28 Jan 2015 | 9:54 am
    Currently, doctors have to throw away more than 80 percent of donated tissue used for joint replacements because the tissue does not survive long enough to be transplanted. Now, researchers have developed a new technology that more than doubles the life of the tissue. This new technology was able to preserve tissue quality at the required level in all of the donated tissues studied, the researchers found.
  • Device for guided surgery of deviations in long bones patented

    26 Jan 2015 | 8:22 am
    A device that can be applied in surgeries to correct deviations in long bones has been patented by researchers. The research team found how to use the 3D reconstruction of an affected bone to determine the mathematical formula that in a given case is suitable to design such a device. This device is adjusted to a specific deviated bone and enables a surgeon to set the cutting angle that best suits the bone, and, also, to set the location and orientation of holes that accept the future addition of a corrective prosthesis. It enables realigning the body extremity that is operated on, and also…
  • Rare neurological disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells

    22 Jan 2015 | 10:28 am
    Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease, or PMD, is a devastating neurological condition that, in its most severe form, kills infants weeks after birth. Thirty years ago, a neuroscientist noticed a genetic mutation in dogs that was practically identical to the disease in humans. Now, that has laid out the results of his marathon pursuit of PMD.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • 'Healthy' fat tissue could be key to reversing type 2 diabetes

    28 Jan 2015 | 6:35 am
    Preventing inflammation in obese fat tissue may hold the key to preventing or even reversing type 2 diabetes, new research has found. The scientists found they could 'reverse' type 2 diabetes in laboratory models by dampening the inflammatory response in fat tissue.
  • Keeping the kraken asleep: Insight into the role of stem cells in leukemia

    27 Jan 2015 | 8:09 am
    Despite enormous progress in cancer therapy, many patients still relapse because their treatment addresses the symptoms of the disease rather than the cause, the so-called stem cells. New work has given a tantalizing clue to a solution. Scientists report that the cell-cycle kinase CDK6 is required for activation of the stem cells responsible for causing leukemia.
  • How a cancer-causing virus blocks human immune response

    26 Jan 2015 | 1:46 pm
    Scientists have revealed how a type of cancer-causing virus outwits the human body's immune response. The discovery might help explain why some cancer therapies that incorporate interferon fail to treat certain cancers and might lead to more effective treatments.
  • The language of T lymphocytes deciphered, the 'Rosetta Stone' of the immune system

    23 Jan 2015 | 5:17 am
    How can our immune system defend us against aggressors so diverse such as viruses, parasites, fungi and tumors? The secret lies in the large number of clones of T and B lymphocytes, each of which expresses a particular specific receptor. Until a few years ago, deciphering the complexity of this vast repertoire was considered impossible. A "Rosetta stone", or a key for decoding, was missing in order to “translate” and understand this "language" in all its complexity.
  • Sexually-transmitted diseases: Do multiple partners mean more immunity?

    23 Jan 2015 | 5:17 am
    It has been assumed that the increased transmission of sexually-transmitted diseases in the case of mating promiscuity is influential in shaping the immune system of mammals. Results of a new study demonstrate that this simple idea does not apply to rodents, and that living circumstances and the environment can be a key factor in determining variation in immune investment among mammals.
 
Log in