Anatomy

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  • Murder Appeal Focuses on Autopsy Report

    Anatomy News
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:22 pm
    An autopsy report that lacked a medical doctor's sworn confirmation … oath by the medical doctor who performed the autopsy, the cause of … conviction. Rukoro argued that the autopsy report did not comply with …
  • DNA looping damage tied to HPV cancer, researcher discovers

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    16 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    Certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) are known to cause about five percent of all cancer cases, yet all the mechanisms aren't completely understood. Now, researchers have leveraged Ohio Supercomputer Center resources and whole-genome sequencing to identify a new way that HPV might spark cancer development -- by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when HPV is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.
  • Does A Junk Food Diet Make You Lazy?

    physiology « WordPress.com Tag Feed
    neuroakn
    6 Apr 2014 | 12:04 pm
    A new psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary, rather than vice versa. Life scientists placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. The ingredients in the second were highly processed, of lower quality and included substantially more sugar — a proxy for a junk food diet. A new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around. Life…
  • Fibromyalgia - An Emerging but Controversial Condition - 2014 JAMA Update

    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:30 am
    Fibromyalgia is not a rheumatological disease but a central pain syndrome. It is a complicated condition that tends to last a long time, although people do get better. The syndrome termed fibromyalgia or fibrositis has attracted the interest of investigators for quite some time. Although some authors believe that fibromyalgia is not a discrete condition, rheumatologists now report that fibromyalgia is one of the most common diagnoses in ambulatory practice. Recent estimates of the prevalence of fibromyalgia in the United States have ranged from 3 to 6 million.This JAMA video introduces a free…
  • Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. II. Impact of exercise training in obesity

    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue
    Padilla, J., Jenkins, N. T., Thorne, P. K., Martin, J. S., Rector, R. S., Davis, J. W., Laughlin, M. H.
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the extent to which exercise training alters global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries and aortic endothelial cells of obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Transcriptional profiles of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle feed arteries (SFA and GFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EndEx; n = 12) or a interval sprint training program (IST; n = 12) or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12) were examined.
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • DNA looping damage tied to HPV cancer, researcher discovers

    16 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    Certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) are known to cause about five percent of all cancer cases, yet all the mechanisms aren't completely understood. Now, researchers have leveraged Ohio Supercomputer Center resources and whole-genome sequencing to identify a new way that HPV might spark cancer development -- by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when HPV is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.
  • Fighting neuroblastomas by blocking DNA replication, repair

    16 Apr 2014 | 7:13 am
    PCNA is a protein essential to DNA repair and replication, and researchers are targeting it in neuroblastoma cells in order to halt tumor growth and induce cell death. Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today.
  • Breaking bad mitochondria: How hepatitis C survives for so long

    15 Apr 2014 | 11:39 am
    A mechanism has been discovered that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. The hard-to-kill pathogen, which infects an estimated 200 million people worldwide, attacks the liver cells' energy centers -- the mitochondria -- dismantling the cell's innate ability to fight infection. It does this by altering cells mitochondrial dynamics.
  • Unexpected protein partnership has implications for cancer treatment

    15 Apr 2014 | 8:13 am
    Two unlikely partners in a type of immune cell called a macrophage that work together in response to cancer drugs have been found by researchers. This partnership increases inflammation in a way that may alter tumor growth.
  • Experimental blood test spots recurrent breast cancers, monitors response to treatment

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:39 am
    A blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment has been designed by researchers. The test, called the cMethDNA assay, accurately detected the presence of cancer DNA in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancers up to 95 percent of the time in laboratory studies.
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    physiology « WordPress.com Tag Feed

  • Does A Junk Food Diet Make You Lazy?

    neuroakn
    6 Apr 2014 | 12:04 pm
    A new psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary, rather than vice versa. Life scientists placed 32 female rats on one of two diets for six months. The first, a standard rat’s diet, consisted of relatively unprocessed foods like ground corn and fish meal. The ingredients in the second were highly processed, of lower quality and included substantially more sugar — a proxy for a junk food diet. A new UCLA psychology study provides evidence that being overweight makes people tired and sedentary — not the other way around. Life…
  • Crazy elegant

    Pairodox Farm
    6 Apr 2014 | 7:06 am
    If you can identify the object below please ignore the fact for just a moment and tell me what the image reminds you of. It looks to me like a leaf, complete with midrib and lots of ramifying veins. The dark nodules remind me of the sort of damage produced by certain aphid infestations. In fact, this is a photo of part of a sheep placenta delivered here the other day. The mammalian placenta is a fascinating structure and one which I have discussed before. Joanna agrees that the placenta is remarkable but wonders how an image of one will be received by those who frequent this blog. Mammals are…
  • Cooked or raw?

    reneecassels
    6 Apr 2014 | 4:03 am
    Globally diverse, locally specialised Around the world, humans ingest an extensive range of foodstuffs with many different acquisition and preparation techniques. Some would argue that our key evolutionary adaptation has not been to specialisation but in fact, to variation. Conversely, Wrangham (2013) argues that locally we are often restricted in variety and specialised in acquisition and technique. Something that is agreed to be unique to our species and universal in its application is cooking – the use of heat with the purpose offsetting the limitations of non-specialised dentition and…
  • Art History Lesson: Kurt Cobain the Visual Artist

    CherryBlossom
    5 Apr 2014 | 4:43 pm
      We all know Kurt Cobain as the main brain and all around awesome leader of the band Nirvana, but he was not only a musical artist, he was a visual artist too. Kurt had expressed his interest in going to art school throughout his life and he dedicated many hours to making comics, paintings, drawings, sculpture, collages, cover art for Nirvana, and even designing the band’s music videos. His work reflected ideas of surreal situations that were inspired by death, carnage, biology, and pregnancy. Although some subjects seem dark to the average viewer, the meanings reflect his…
  • Focus-Phone-Physical - a formula for life?

    leximckee
    5 Apr 2014 | 2:55 am
    On Focus, on the Phone and getting Physical After a while you can think that you’ve learned some of the great lessons in life. This is often balanced by an increasing realisation that you know almost nothing as deeply as you should! What I’m about to share, however, I think is the truth. I believe our state-of-mind is highly dependent upon the associations we are making with three major sensory inputs: What we focus on What we listen to What we do with our body. To give these a rhythm, I talk about Focus, Phone and getting Physical. (“Phone” comes from the Greek word for “sound”.)…
 
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Fibromyalgia - An Emerging but Controversial Condition - 2014 JAMA Update

    16 Apr 2014 | 6:30 am
    Fibromyalgia is not a rheumatological disease but a central pain syndrome. It is a complicated condition that tends to last a long time, although people do get better. The syndrome termed fibromyalgia or fibrositis has attracted the interest of investigators for quite some time. Although some authors believe that fibromyalgia is not a discrete condition, rheumatologists now report that fibromyalgia is one of the most common diagnoses in ambulatory practice. Recent estimates of the prevalence of fibromyalgia in the United States have ranged from 3 to 6 million.This JAMA video introduces a free…
  • Male hypogonadism - 2014 Lancet review

    15 Apr 2014 | 7:12 am
    Clinical presentations vary dependent on:- time of onset of androgen deficiency- whether the defect is in testosterone production or spermatogenesis- associated genetic factors- history of androgen therapyDiagnosis of hypogonadism is made on the basis of:- signs and symptoms consistent with androgen deficiency- low morning testosterone concentrations in serum on multiple occasions Several testosterone-replacement therapies are approved. Contraindications to testosterone-replacement therapy include:- prostate and breast cancers- uncontrolled congestive heart failure- severe lower-urinary-tract…
  • Real doctors, real people: from beekeeper to "tough mudder"

    14 Apr 2014 | 1:32 pm
    Dr. Jonathan Kirsch, a hospitalist at UNC Health Care, is also a beekeeper. He enjoys both the honey and the benefit of pollinated fruit trees and hand-picked fruit.A team from the UNC Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplant Program headed up by Tippu Khan, PharmD, BCOP and Nicole Frazier, RN, BSN participated in an epic journey which included leaping over fire, trekking through waste-high mud, tossing spears, dodging attacks and most of all braving near freezing temperatures in the driving rain. What is all this about? It's the Spartan Race, an event of pure primitive craziness that promises…
  • Altmetric tracks the buzz around scholarly articles: You can make a difference

    11 Apr 2014 | 6:00 am
    Altmetric tracks the buzz around scholarly articles - see an example: http://bit.ly/1lF9KtR You can make a difference. See how my blog contributed to one of highest ever scores in this journal for this article (ranked #7 of 972): Children with severe asthma have 32 times higher risk for developing COPD http://buff.ly/1oIJ3FHHere is the blog post: Allergy Notes: What are the top 3 asthma articles for March 2014? Vote here http://bit.ly/1hjZ6JuThe article will be included in the next edition of What Is New In Small Airways…
  • Top medicine articles for April 2014

    10 Apr 2014 | 8:50 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Vitamin D supplements are taken by nearly half of American adults. Low levels of vitamin D are a result, not a cause, of poor health. Therefore, supplement may not help http://buff.ly/Ml153n -- Vitamin D supplement sales increased more than 10-fold, from $24 million in 2002 to $605 million in 2011 (US data) http://buff.ly/Mo7Ykj"Is Your Stethoscope Going to Join Typewriter in the Storage Closet?" http://buff.ly/1dILsbh - However, you can't listen to lungs with ultrasound.Coffee Hydrates as Well as Water…
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of rat skeletal muscle feed arteries. II. Impact of exercise training in obesity

    Padilla, J., Jenkins, N. T., Thorne, P. K., Martin, J. S., Rector, R. S., Davis, J. W., Laughlin, M. H.
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    We employed next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology to determine the extent to which exercise training alters global gene expression in skeletal muscle feed arteries and aortic endothelial cells of obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Transcriptional profiles of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle feed arteries (SFA and GFA, respectively) and aortic endothelial cell-enriched samples from rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EndEx; n = 12) or a interval sprint training program (IST; n = 12) or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12) were examined.
  • Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women

    Csapo, R., Malis, V., Hodgson, J., Sinha, S.
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and…
  • Tracheal occlusion-evoked respiratory load compensation and inhibitory neurotransmitter expression in rats

    Tsai, H.-W., Davenport, P. W.
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    Respiratory load compensation is a sensory-motor reflex generated in the brain stem respiratory neural network. The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is thought to be the primary structure to process the respiratory load-related afferent activity and contribute to the modification of the breathing pattern by sending efferent projections to other structures in the brain stem respiratory neural network. The sensory pathway and motor responses of respiratory load compensation have been studied extensively; however, the mechanism of neurogenesis of load compensation is still unknown. A variety…
  • Influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training on the plasma cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation

    Mills, D. E., Johnson, M. A., McPhilimey, M. J., Williams, N. C., Gonzalez, J. T., Barnett, Y. A., Sharpe, G. R.
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    The influence of oxidative stress, diaphragm fatigue, and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on the cytokine response to maximum sustainable voluntary ventilation (MSVV) is unknown. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of (1) passive rest and (2) MSVV, whereby participants undertook volitional hyperpnea at rest that mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns commensurate with heavy cycling exercise. Plasma cytokines remained unchanged during passive…
  • Skeletal muscle capillary density and microvascular function are compromised with aging and type 2 diabetes

    Groen, B. B. L., Hamer, H. M., Snijders, T., van Kranenburg, J., Frijns, D., Vink, H., van Loon, L. J. C.
    15 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    Adequate muscle perfusion is required for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. Impairments in microvascular structure and/or function with aging and type 2 diabetes have been associated with the progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. Our objective was to compare muscle fiber type specific capillary density and endothelial function between healthy young men, healthy older men, and age-matched type 2 diabetes patients. Fifteen healthy young men (24 ± 1 yr), 15 healthy older men (70 ± 2 yr), and 15 age-matched type 2 diabetes patients (70 ± 1 yr) were selected to…
 
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    MedPage Today Cardiovascular

  • FDA OKs Boston Scientific's 'Mini' ICDs

    16 Apr 2014 | 7:30 am
    (MedPage Today) -- The FDA approved four next-generation defibrillators from Boston Scientific -- two smaller, thinner versions and two beefed-up versions, the company announced Tuesday.
  • Vegetative State: Clues from Imaging?

    15 Apr 2014 | 3:30 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- Comatose patients who appeared vegetative in clinical exams, but who later recovered full consciousness, could be identified in many cases with FDG-PET or active functional MRI scans.
  • Drugs KO Devices for Prevention of Clots in ICU

    15 Apr 2014 | 1:54 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- Prophylactic anticoagulation may save lives in the ICU compared with mechanical devices for protection against venous thromboembolism, an observational study suggested.
  • FDA Greenlights Another Weekly GLP-1 Agonist

    15 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- The FDA has approved albiglutide (Tanzeum), a once-weekly GLP-1 agonist for type 2 diabetes, the agency announced.
  • Sleep Apnea Linked to Cancer

    15 Apr 2014 | 12:44 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- Cancer may be yet another risk to add to the list linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a longitudinal population-based study affirmed.
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    Digestive System News

  • New Us Research Chemicals & Medical Care Company Launches Custom Online Ordering

    16 Apr 2014 | 12:57 pm
    Us Research Chemicals & Medical Care is introducing an easy 3 step process to purchasing custom Research Chemicals in bulk or private label packaging options. ASHEVILLE, NC, UNITED STATES, April 17, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- In these economic times …
  • Horse's health scare sheds light on God's healing ability

    16 Apr 2014 | 11:52 am
    Sometimes horses seem to be flying as they race across the pasture or soar over 3-foot jumps, seemingly taking flight. Yet they are not birds, are not meant to fly, and most certainly are not meant to eat gravel. I have a horse that seems to fly as he …
  • The healthy way to break a fast

    16 Apr 2014 | 11:03 am
    … fast, there’s a healthier way to transition to … can initially cause an upset stomach and digestive issues, according to … nutrition” that gives the digestive system a break. His … .” She recommends eating easily digestible carbohydrates such as oatmeal, …
  • Nspc's Dr. Brian Snyder And Dr. Elizabeth Trinidad Trained To Implant 'Revolutionary' New Device

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:48 am
    NeuroPace® RNS® Shown to Help Patients Whose Epilepsy Can’t be Controlled with Drugs ROCKVILLE CENTRE, NY, USA, April 16, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Functional and restorative neurosurgeon Brian J. Snyder, M.D., and pediatric neurosurgeon Elizabeth M. …
  • 'Miracle girl' healthy after seven-organ transplant in Paris

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:03 am
    … ’s disease, a severe digestive and gastrointestinal disorder, the … nearly twelve hours: the stomach, pancreas, small intestine, right … . Before her operation, her digestive system had no nerves … with Erika in stable health, the surgery is considered …
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Osteoporosis risk heightened among sleep apnea patients

    15 Apr 2014 | 10:38 am
    A diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea may raise the risk of osteoporosis, particularly among women or older individuals, according to a new study. Sleep apnea is a condition that causes brief interruptions in breathing during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea, the most common form, occurs when a person's airway becomes blocked during sleep. If sleep apnea goes untreated, it can raise the risk for stroke, cardiovascular disease and heart attacks.
  • New management, return-to-play guidelines for Female Athlete Triad examined

    14 Apr 2014 | 2:21 pm
    New evidence-based guidelines on management and return to play of the Female Athlete Triad was recently reviewed by experts. The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: low energy availability with or without disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction and low bone mineral density.
  • Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, craniofacial manifestations

    14 Apr 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals.
  • Osteoporosis drugs appear to impede cell membrane repair

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:38 am
    A class of drugs widely used to treat osteoporosis appears to impede a cell's ability to repair a protective outer membrane that helps determine what enters and exits, researchers report. The inability to quickly repair a membrane is lethal to a cell and may help explain the rare and serious side effect of jawbone destruction that can occur following dental work in patients taking these drugs, the researchers note.
  • How a Silly Putty ingredient could advance stem cell therapies

    13 Apr 2014 | 10:59 am
    The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a study shows. The researchers coaxed human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells more efficiently by growing the cells on a soft, utrafine carpet made of a key ingredient in Silly Putty.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Rare disease of the inner ear: New insights

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:38 pm
    In the most comprehensive study of Ménière's Disease to date, researchers have been able to suggest what goes wrong in the body when people develop the disease, and provide an insight into factors that lead to its development. The analysis also showed that Ménière's patients were more likely to suffer falls and mental health problems, such as depression, than people without the condition.
  • Mouse model would have predicted toxicity of drug that killed 5 in 1993 clinical trial

    15 Apr 2014 | 3:13 pm
    Over 20 years after the fatal fialuridine trial, a new study demonstrates that mice with humanized livers recapitulate the drug's toxicity. The work suggests that this mouse model should be added to the repertoire of tools used in preclinical screening of drugs for liver toxicity before they are given to human participants in clinical trials.
  • Breaking bad mitochondria: How hepatitis C survives for so long

    15 Apr 2014 | 11:39 am
    A mechanism has been discovered that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. The hard-to-kill pathogen, which infects an estimated 200 million people worldwide, attacks the liver cells' energy centers -- the mitochondria -- dismantling the cell's innate ability to fight infection. It does this by altering cells mitochondrial dynamics.
  • New method isolates immune cells to study how they ward off oral diseases

    15 Apr 2014 | 9:53 am
    Dental researchers have found a less invasive way to extract single rare immune cells from the mouth to study how the mouth’s natural defenses ward off infection and inflammation. By isolating some specialized immune cells (white blood cells known as "leukocytes") to study how they fight diseases in the mouth -- or reject foreign tissues, such as in failed organ transplants -- researchers hope to learn more about treating and preventing such health issues as oral cancers, cardiovascular disease, AIDS and other infectious diseases.
  • Unexpected protein partnership has implications for cancer treatment

    15 Apr 2014 | 8:13 am
    Two unlikely partners in a type of immune cell called a macrophage that work together in response to cancer drugs have been found by researchers. This partnership increases inflammation in a way that may alter tumor growth.
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Cancer drugs block dementia-linked brain inflammation, study finds

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:33 am
    A class of drugs developed to treat immune-related conditions and cancer -- including one currently in clinical trials for glioblastoma and other tumors -- eliminates neural inflammation associated with dementia-linked diseases and brain injuries, according to researchers. In their study, the researchers discovered that the drugs, which can be delivered orally, eradicated microglia, the primary immune cells of the brain. These cells exacerbate many neural diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, as well as brain injury.
  • How smells stick to your memories: Your nose can be a pathfinder

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:33 am
    Waves in your brain make smells stick to your memories and inner maps. Researchers have recently discovered the process behind this phenomenon. The brain, it turns out, connects smells to memories through an associative process where neural networks are linked through synchronized brain waves of 20-40 Hz.
  • MRI pinpoints region of brain injury in some concussion patients

    15 Apr 2014 | 5:45 am
    Researchers using information provided by a magnetic resonance imaging technique have identified regional white matter damage in the brains of people who experience chronic dizziness and other symptoms after concussion. The findings suggest that information provided by MRI can speed the onset of effective treatments for concussion patients.
  • Neuroscientists: Brain activity may mark beginning of memories

    14 Apr 2014 | 9:35 am
    By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists can mark the birth of a memory. The hippocampus is the brain's warehouse for long- and short-term processing of episodic memories, such as memories of a specific experience like a trip to Maine or a recent dinner. What no one knew was what happens in the hippocampus the moment an experience imprints itself as a memory. New research is lending clues to what they call "spatial mapping functions" in the brain.
  • How a Silly Putty ingredient could advance stem cell therapies

    13 Apr 2014 | 10:59 am
    The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a study shows. The researchers coaxed human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells more efficiently by growing the cells on a soft, utrafine carpet made of a key ingredient in Silly Putty.
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