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  • How to combine exercise and diet in one acivity: Should hospitals teach patients how to grow vegetables?

    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog
    1 May 2015 | 5:40 am
    Google has a vegetable gardenGoogle was doing it in 2007: In Growing our connection to food, Google explained they launched a mini-farm on campus with 300 self-watering containers. The correct name for the containers is sub-irrigated planters (SIPs) and they can be purchased commercially ($30) or made from plastic totes. Sports team has a mini-farmSan Francisco Giants have a mini-farm on their stadium growing kale, Swiss chard, lemon grass, sage and more. The garden—one of the first of its kind at an American sports stadium—comes as a bizarre sight to some fans who associate stadiums with…
  • Herpes Infects 19 Million People per Year; CBCD Reviews a Report

    Anatomy News
    27 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    A study showed that Americans have a high chance of becoming infected with the herpes virus. (1) ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, May 26, 2015 /EINPresswire.com/ -- “Infected with the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 or HSV-2)? The CBCD recommends …
  • Cocaine addiction, craving and relapse

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    26 May 2015 | 6:50 pm
    One of the major challenges of cocaine addiction is the high rate of relapse after periods of withdrawal and abstinence. But new research reveals that changes in our DNA during drug withdrawal may offer promising ways of developing more effective treatments for addiction. Withdrawal from drug use results in reprogramming of the genes in the brain that lead to addictive personality, say researchers.
  • The Real Science of Daredevil: Science Friction Ep 45 Like...

    WordPress Tag: Physiology
    scientiflix
    13 May 2015 | 1:49 pm
    The Real Science of Daredevil: Science Friction Ep 45 Like Daredevil, blind people in the real world have taught themselves to sense their surroundings despite having completely lost their vision. By: Science Friction.
  • Last Word on Viewpoint: The two-hour marathon: What's the equivalent for women?

    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue
    Hunter, S. K., Joyner, M. J., Jones, A. M.
    15 May 2015 | 9:30 am
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Cocaine addiction, craving and relapse

    26 May 2015 | 6:50 pm
    One of the major challenges of cocaine addiction is the high rate of relapse after periods of withdrawal and abstinence. But new research reveals that changes in our DNA during drug withdrawal may offer promising ways of developing more effective treatments for addiction. Withdrawal from drug use results in reprogramming of the genes in the brain that lead to addictive personality, say researchers.
  • Future vaccine may help lower blood pressure long-term

    26 May 2015 | 1:42 pm
    A DNA vaccine helped lower blood pressure for up to six months, reduced tissue damage to the heart and blood vessels associated with hypertension in rats, investigators report. If future research shows the vaccine is a viable treatment option in humans, it could improve high blood pressure levels.
  • Study examines association of genetic variants with cognitive impairment

    26 May 2015 | 9:38 am
    Individually rare but collectively common intermediate-size copy number variations may be negatively associated with educational attainment, according to a study. Copy number variations (CNVs) are regions of the genome that differ in the number of segments of DNA.
  • How DNA is organized in our cells

    26 May 2015 | 8:06 am
    A critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure has been uncovered by researchers. Their breakthrough helps explain how DNA is organized in our cells. This discovery could lead to a better understanding of what causes certain types of cancer, such as lymphoma.
  • Therapy-resistant breast cancer mechanism revealed

    26 May 2015 | 8:05 am
    A cluster of defined, non-coding RNAs are mechanistically involved in endocrine therapy resistance in human breast cancer cells, new research has revealed. Furthermore, resveratrol, a kind of polyphenol, was found to repress these RNAs and inhibit the proliferative activity of breast cancer cells which had acquired resistance.
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • The Real Science of Daredevil: Science Friction Ep 45 Like...

    scientiflix
    13 May 2015 | 1:49 pm
    The Real Science of Daredevil: Science Friction Ep 45 Like Daredevil, blind people in the real world have taught themselves to sense their surroundings despite having completely lost their vision. By: Science Friction.
  • Feel Lost, Disconnected, No Passion or Purpose? You Are Expanding

    Colleen Walser
    13 May 2015 | 12:24 pm
       For those of you have unexplained symptoms of physical or emotional pain, know that you are not alone. Feeling lost, disconnected, without passion or purpose? You are on a path of self discovery. You are riding a wave of new energy. What you are feeling at this very moment is a transition–only one step of many on this grand journey of ascension on this planet that is progressing every second. Much of what you still see in the world and in your experiences is illusion and it is competing heavily with what the heart knows to be true. It’s time to start listening to what matters…
  • How To See Auras

    Colleen Walser
    13 May 2015 | 11:15 am
           Want to learn how to see auras? It’s not nearly as complicated as you may think. And, if you already can see auras, this article might help you refine your “vision.” Firstly, as with all energetic practices, seeing auras will not come through force. It’s important to have an easy, relaxed (even playful) attitude when working with aura vision. Secondly, not everybody is going to see auras. This does not mean the experience is lost if you can’t “see” them. As I mentioned in an earlier article about understanding auras, they…
  • Climbing The Ladder of Awareness

    Colleen Walser
    13 May 2015 | 10:00 am
       When it comes to our understanding of the unfolding global crisis, each of us seems to fit somewhere along a continuum of awareness that can be roughly divided into five stages: Tracing Infinity by Kathleen Farago MayDead asleep. At this stage there seem to be no fundamental problems, just some shortcomings in human organization, behaviour and morality that can be fixed with the proper attention to rule-making. People at this stage tend to live their lives happily, with occasional outbursts of annoyance around election times or the quarterly corporate earnings seasons. Awareness…
  • Enlightenment: How to Be Free From Separation

    Colleen Walser
    13 May 2015 | 9:50 am
       “Separation is not your natural state. You are not separate from everything and trying to get to oneness. You are doing separation. You are actively separating yourself from this moment. And I am not saying not to have definitions, not to call a chair a chair. All of this happens. This duality happens in nonduality. It is not one or the other, it the same. But because you latch on to the definitions you do not see the essence of what is here. It is not wrong to do this, but if you want to be free of stress, of anxiety and conflict, it is important to realize you are doing…
 
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • How to combine exercise and diet in one acivity: Should hospitals teach patients how to grow vegetables?

    1 May 2015 | 5:40 am
    Google has a vegetable gardenGoogle was doing it in 2007: In Growing our connection to food, Google explained they launched a mini-farm on campus with 300 self-watering containers. The correct name for the containers is sub-irrigated planters (SIPs) and they can be purchased commercially ($30) or made from plastic totes. Sports team has a mini-farmSan Francisco Giants have a mini-farm on their stadium growing kale, Swiss chard, lemon grass, sage and more. The garden—one of the first of its kind at an American sports stadium—comes as a bizarre sight to some fans who associate stadiums with…
  • Medical jokes portray an unflattering picture of doctors in general

    22 Apr 2015 | 7:18 am
    From this French study:Sociological studies have shown the link between humor and unconscious ideas that we have of the society in which we evolve. Researchers conducted a survey to answer the question: "What were the stereotypes of our medical profession that emerge from a transcript of jokes collected in a medical population?"Recruitment of the source population (doctors and medical students) was done through different personal and professional mailing lists, Twitter, Facebook, and medical press. The inclusion period was 6 weeks (from June 6 to July 14, 2013). Each physician recruited…
  • Offer new treatments only as part of post-market trials until data on meaningful outcomes are available, says Ben Goldacre to BMJ

    15 Apr 2015 | 4:30 am
    Watch the video from the BMJ channel below: Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • High-fructose sweeteners are a principal driver of type 2 diabetes

    14 Apr 2015 | 7:16 am
    High-fructose sweeteners are a principal driver of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its consequences, according to a recent report in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Conversely, whole foods that contain fructose (eg, fruits and vegetables) pose no problem for health and are likely protective against diabetes and adverse CV outcomes. Read more here: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(15)00040-3/abstractOur own Dr Hyman discusses How to Avoid the Hidden Dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup in this video from the official Cleveland Clinic YouTube channel: "Dr. Mark Hyman,…
  • This is what happens when social media sites go too far

    14 Mar 2015 | 4:30 am
    From Ray Ray, gardener and YouTube star: "This is what happens when social media sites go too far. Mr Zuckerberg, there are certain things you (Facebook) can NOT have from me." Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
 
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Labor analgesia in low-income countries: Experience from Ghana

    26 May 2015 | 11:05 am
    A program to improve pain control during labor at one of Ghana's largest maternity units greatly increased the use of safe and effective spinal analgesia for women undergoing cesarean section, reports a new article.
  • New findings about mechanisms underlying chronic pain reveal novel therapeutic strategies

    26 May 2015 | 10:23 am
    A critical role for a class of cells present in the brain and spinal cord, called microglia, has been discovered for those in pain. Researchers have found microglia to neuron signaling to be crucial in the development of pain hypersensitivity after injury, but also for one of the paradoxical effects morphine and other opioids sometimes produce, called hyperalgesia, which is an increase in pain sensitivity.
  • Subclinical hyperthyroidism associated with an increased risk of hip and other fractures

    26 May 2015 | 9:38 am
    In an analysis that included more than 70,000 participants from 13 studies, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with an increased risk for hip and other fractures including spine. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is a low serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration in a person without clinical symptoms and normal thyroid hormone concentrations on blood tests.
  • Compound has potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis

    21 May 2015 | 9:11 am
    A new study outlines a chemical compound with potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that affects an estimated 1.3 million people in the world. Characterized by stiff, swollen joints, it's a progressive disease that occurs when the body's immune system attacks its own cells. Inflammation in the lining of the joints leads to loss of bone and cartilage. People who have rheumatoid arthritis lose mobility and joint function without adequate treatment.
  • Researchers focus on potential tool for predicting survival, staging in prostate cancer

    20 May 2015 | 9:28 am
    A molecule that promotes metastasis of advanced prostate cancer to the bone, an incurable condition that significantly decreases quality of life, has been identified by researchers. The research may offer new targets for diagnosing and treating this common disease.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Obese male mice produce more disease-promoting immune cells than females

    26 May 2015 | 5:49 am
    Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice suggests. With the risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for men than women, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets. They found that the difference may lie in the tendency of males to produce higher levels of white blood cells that encourage inflammation, which contributes to the negative health consequences of obesity such as insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.
  • Complex signaling between blood, stem cells controls regeneration in fly gut

    25 May 2015 | 9:04 am
    Having a healthy gut may well depend on maintaining a complex signaling dance between immune cells and the stem cells that line the intestine. Scientists report significant new insight into how these interactions control intestinal regeneration after an infection. It's a dance that ensures repair after a challenge, but that also goes awry in aging fruit flies. The work offers important new clues into possible causes of age-related human maladies, including IBS and colorectal cancer.
  • Microfluidic cell-squeezing device opens new possibilities for cell-based vaccines

    22 May 2015 | 5:32 am
    Researchers have shown that they can use a microfluidic cell-squeezing device to introduce specific antigens inside the immune system’s B cells, providing a new approach to developing and implementing antigen-presenting cell vaccines.
  • Epstein-Barr virus co-infection may boost malaria mortality in childhood

    21 May 2015 | 11:40 am
    Malaria researchers are calling attention to a trouble-maker whose effects may be underappreciated: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Their experiments with mice show that co-infection with a virus closely related to EBV can make a survivable malaria parasite infection lethal.
  • Can a viral co-infection impair immunity against Plasmodium and turn malaria lethal?

    21 May 2015 | 11:39 am
    It is known that infections with certain viruses can weaken the immune response to another pathogen. A new study reports provocative findings in mice that infection with the mouse equivalent of Epstein-Barr virus can turn infections with certain parasites that cause malaria in mice (which are normally quickly suppressed by the immune system) into a lethal disease.
 
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