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  • Persistent insomnia linked to higher risk of death, study finds

    Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today
    27 Feb 2015 | 3:00 am
    A new study shows that people who experience persistent insomnia have a higher risk of inflammation and premature death than those who experience intermittent insomnia.
  • Multiple sclerosis: New drug target discovered

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    17 Feb 2015 | 8:44 am
    A promising new approach to treat multiple sclerosis has been discovered by scientists. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive, often disabling neurological disease, which is most often diagnosed among young adults between the ages of 15 and 40. While the exact cause of MS is unknown, the body's immune response is involved, and is the target of all current medications used in treatment. These medications do not cure the illness, but they do help alleviate symptoms and slow the progression of the disease.
  • Reducing energy efficiency boosts calorie burning in muscle

    Bones / Orthopedics News From Medical News Today
    24 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    Injection that makes muscles less energy efficient may have potential as weight-loss therapy to treat obesityScientists at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Medical Center have...
  • Younger women delay seeking help for heart attacks, study finds

    Cardiovascular / Cardiology News From Medical News Today
    26 Feb 2015 | 1:00 am
    Younger women may ignore or dismiss the earliest symptoms of an impending heart attack, such as pain and dizziness, and delay seeking emergency medical care.
  • Neurons controlling appetite made from skin cells

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    27 Feb 2015 | 8:25 am
    Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity.
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • New tool provides maps of protein interactions for 2,800 diseases

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:26 am
    A new tool allows researchers to explore how alterations in more than 2,000 proteins affect the diverse biological functions in which these molecules are involved. The tool may help gain a more global view of the causes of tumor development.
  • Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:26 am
    Researchers have long sought an efficient way to untangle DNA to study its structure -- neatly unraveled and straightened out -- under a microscope. Now, researchers have devised a simple and effective solution: they inject genetic material into a droplet of water and use a pipet tip to drag it over a glass plate covered with a sticky polymer.
  • Transient details of HIV genome packaging captured

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:25 am
    Once HIV-1 has hijacked a host cell to make copies of its own RNA genome and viral proteins, it must assemble these components into new virus particles. The orchestration of this intricate assembly process falls to a viral protein known as Gag. For one thing, Gag must be able to discern viral RNA from the host cell’s and squirrel it away inside new viral particles — no easy task considering only two to three percent of the RNA found in the cytoplasm is from HIV-1. Exactly how Gag selectively packages viral RNA has been widely speculated but never directly observed.
  • Neurons controlling appetite made from skin cells

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:25 am
    Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity.
  • DNA evidence shows surprise cultural connections between Britain and Europe 8,000 years ago

    27 Feb 2015 | 5:45 am
    DNA evidence shows surprise cultural connections between Britain and Europe 8,000 years ago. Researchers found evidence for a variety of wheat at a submerged archaeological site off the south coast of England, 2,000 years before the introduction of farming in the UK.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Why Don’t We Remember The Other Side Of The Veil?

    colleenwalser
    20 Feb 2015 | 3:45 pm
    by Gregg Prescott, M.S. Editor, In5D.com Before you reincarnate to this planet, you will go through a series of tests to see if you remember anything about being on the other side of the veil. Here’s my story. I recently had a dream where I was on the other side of the veil making my soul contract. My soul mate’s sister, Amie, agreed to meet me on this side of the veil because my soul mate wasn’t going to incarnate with me. Amie looked nearly identical to my ex-wife, Jodi, and our arrangement to meet one another was approved by my soulmate. I saw part of my soul contract when I was on…
  • How to Receive Intuitive Guidance From Your Spirit Guides

    colleenwalser
    20 Feb 2015 | 3:40 pm
    by Angela Artemis Do you have spirit guides? Do you know who they are? And, why you have them? We all have spirit guides, whether we know it or not. Our guides are here to help us navigate the physical world and learn the lessons we incarnated to learn. Here’s an example of “lesson” I had recently with one of my guides: While in a deep meditation I was visited by Ben, my native American guide. He pulled me up onto his beautiful white stallion. We rode bareback galloping through the desert past the red hills of New Mexico. Ben said, ‘I’m here to teach you to follow the signs just as…
  • Do your organs grow with you? - Big Questions - (Ep. 20) This...

    scientiflix
    20 Feb 2015 | 1:54 pm
    Do your organs grow with you? – Big Questions – (Ep. 20) This week, Jen Alexander asks, “Do your organs grow with you?” By: Mental Floss. Store: http://store.mentalfloss.com/ (enter promo code: “YoutubeFlossers” for 15% off!)
  • Physiology COM III

    yeditepetip2013
    20 Feb 2015 | 12:00 pm
    26 Urine Formation and Renal Blood Flow R 27 Urine Formation (Tubular Processing) 28 Regulation of Osmolarity and Na Concentration 29 Renal Regulation of K, Ca and Mg 30 Regulation of Acid-Base Balance 74 introduction of endocrinology, MEDII, 2015 75 Growth hormone, MEDII, 2015 75 Pituitary Gland and Hypothalamic Control MED II, 2015 76 Physiology of Thyroid Gland MED II 2015 77 Adrenocortical hormones MED II 78 Insulin, Regulation of Blood Glucose MED II 79 Parathyroid and Ca Metabolism (E) 80 Male reproductıve system MED II 80 Pineal gland MED II 81 Female Reproductive Physiology MEDII 82…
  • CO2 and inorganic nutrient enrichment affect the performance of a calcifying green alga and its noncalcifying epiphyte

    olgaanghelici
    20 Feb 2015 | 6:27 am
    Ocean acidification studies in the past decade have greatly improved our knowledge of how calcifying
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Keratitis and Contact Lens Use - CDC video

    16 Feb 2015 | 5:04 am
    Misuse of contact lenses (wearing them too long, not cleaning them properly) causes 1 million eye infections/yr in US. "Contact lenses offer many benefits, but they are not risk-free. Keratitis can be a scary infection, but it is preventable if people follow healthy habits and take care of their eyes and their lenses". Some bad habits, such as sleeping with contact lenses, failing to clean and replace lens solution frequently, and letting contact lenses get wet while swimming or in the shower, greatly raises the risk for keratitis. People who wear their contact lenses overnight are more than…
  • Tracking Sleep With Wearables Literally Changed My Life - The Medical Futurist

    14 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    From Bertalan Mesko: "I use wearable gadgets to measure the quality of my sleep and as some of the subscribers asked me how I do that in details step by step, I thought I would share the whole process and my methods in one video. I hope you will find it useful." Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Wearing a Weapon: The Football Helmet's Dangerous Evolution

    10 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    The history of how helmets arrived on the football field, from TIME: Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Don't trust celebrities for health advice -- How did the anti-vaccination movement begin? (CNN video)

    9 Feb 2015 | 4:00 am
    How did the anti-vaccination movement begin? CNN's Deborah Feyerick takes a look at the origins behind the anti-vaccination movement and how is has impact the measles outbreak. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • How to Treat Dandruff - video by American Academy of Dermatology

    3 Feb 2015 | 5:00 am
    Dandruff is a common scalp condition in which small pieces of dry skin flake off of the scalp. The most effective way to treat and control dandruff is to use dandruff shampoo and scalp treatments. Some patients may need to use several different shampoos in succession. Follow these tips from dermatologists to get the best results. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Corrigendum

    15 Feb 2015 | 9:30 am
  • Effect of inhaled carbon dioxide on laryngeal abduction

    Cheetham, J., Jones, A., Martin-Flores, M.
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:30 am
    Hypercapnia produces a profound effect on respiratory drive and upper airway function to maintain airway patency. Previous work has evaluated the effects of hypercapnia on the sole arytenoid abductor, the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA), using indirect measures of function, such as electromyography and direct nerve recording. Here we describe a novel method to evaluate PCA function in anesthetized animals and use this method to determine the effects of hypercapnia on PCA function. Eight dogs were anesthetized, and a laryngeal mask airway was used, in combination with high-speed videoendoscopy,…
  • Respiratory cortical processing to inspiratory resistances during wakefulness in children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Tapia, I. E., McDonough, J. M., Huang, J., Marcus, C. L., Gallagher, P. R., Shults, J., Davenport, P. W.
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:30 am
    Children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) have impaired respiratory afferent cortical processing during sleep that persists after treatment of OSAS. However, it is unknown whether this impairment is present during wakefulness and, if so, whether it improves after OSAS treatment. We hypothesized that children with OSAS, during wakefulness, have abnormal cortical processing of respiratory stimuli manifested by blunted respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) and that this resolves after OSAS treatment. We measured RREP during wakefulness in 26 controls and 21 children with…
  • A computational study of the role of the aortic arch in idiopathic unilateral vocal-fold paralysis

    Williams, M. J., Ayylasomayajula, A., Behkam, R., Bierhals, A. J., Jacobs, M. E., Edgar, J. D., Paniello, R. C., Barkmeier-Kraemer, J. M., Vande Geest, J. P.
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:30 am
    Unilateral vocal-fold paralysis (UVP) occurs when one of the vocal folds becomes paralyzed due to damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Individuals with UVP experience problems with speaking, swallowing, and breathing. Nearly two-thirds of all cases of UVP is associated with impaired function of the left RLN, which branches from the vagus nerve within the thoracic cavity and loops around the aorta before ascending to the larynx within the neck. We hypothesize that this path predisposes the left RLN to a supraphysiological, biomechanical environment, contributing to onset of UVP.
  • Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles

    Kennedy, D. S., Fitzpatrick, S. C., Gandevia, S. C., Taylor, J. L.
    15 Feb 2015 | 9:30 am
    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects…
 
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    Digestive System News

  • How the Body Drops Off

    28 Feb 2015 | 10:01 am
    … that shorten life span and health of the body. The Anu … are contrary to life and health. He eats bad food that … , that lies heavily in the stomach for long hours and eats … the earlier food in the stomach getting digested. He indulges in physical …
  • You know about probiotics, but what about prebiotics?

    28 Feb 2015 | 9:46 am
    … these living organisms in our guts. They go about their … doing important work keeping our digestive system healthy and, in turn, … the details of how our gut microbiome works. Beyond being … gradually to avoid upsetting your digestive system. It is not …
  • Root vegetables — Good for adults and children too

    28 Feb 2015 | 6:56 am
    … support healthy bodies, especially our eyes, heart, lungs and digestive … in our own digestive tract, aiding in digestion of proteins … vegetables loose nutritional and health benefits from over-cooking. So, … an excellent aid in digestion, as a diuretic and …
  • Designer Cortney Novogratz: You Don’t Always Have to Play It Safe

    27 Feb 2015 | 5:20 pm
    … ’s, and Walmart.com. Architectural Digest just featured them as a … rules. I decorate with my gut. Take a few risks! Listen … Your Body TV, featuring timely health and lifestyle blogs, podcasts, and …
  • How to Heal a Leaky Gut

    27 Feb 2015 | 3:39 pm
    … is hard on your gut. Your entire digestive tract can be … cause surprisingly big problems. A healthy gut is very selective about … Boston, recently discovered that leaky guts can even lead to … thing. “The discovery that human health and behavior are profoundly …
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Common hip issue in teens misdiagnosed as pulled muscle

    24 Feb 2015 | 3:25 pm
    An athlete felt pain in his groin after a collision at the plate with an opposing player. He thought he had pulled a muscle, but it turns out he was suffering from a common condition seen in teens and young adults known as hip impingement.
  • Should paramedics be allowed to give antibiotics to trauma victims?

    24 Feb 2015 | 6:17 am
    In trauma victims with open fractures, infection rates can be reduced dramatically by administering antibiotics within the first hour of injury. The finding suggests that allowing paramedics to administer antibiotics in the field may substantially improve outcomes.
  • Help for people with muscle cramps?

    18 Feb 2015 | 1:55 pm
    A new treatment may bring hope for people who suffer from muscle cramps or spasms from neuromuscular disorders, diseases such as multiple sclerosis or simply from nighttime leg cramps that keep people from sleeping, according to a new study.
  • Bone-loss score may tip off doctors to gum disease in postmenopausal women

    17 Feb 2015 | 10:13 am
    A link between postmenopausal women with high scores on a Fracture Assessment Risk Tool, and symptoms of severe gum disease, has been found by researchers.
  • Multiple sclerosis: New drug target discovered

    17 Feb 2015 | 8:44 am
    A promising new approach to treat multiple sclerosis has been discovered by scientists. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive, often disabling neurological disease, which is most often diagnosed among young adults between the ages of 15 and 40. While the exact cause of MS is unknown, the body's immune response is involved, and is the target of all current medications used in treatment. These medications do not cure the illness, but they do help alleviate symptoms and slow the progression of the disease.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • New compounds protect nervous system from the structural damage characteristic of multiple sclerosis

    27 Feb 2015 | 3:10 pm
    A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study. Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the brain and spinal cord, where for unknown reasons, the body's immune system begins an inflammatory attack against myelin, the protective nerve coating that surrounds nerve fibers. Once myelin is stripped from these fibers, the nerve cells become highly susceptible to damage, which is believed to underlie their destruction, leading to the steady clinical decline seen in progressive…
  • New breast cancer test links immune 'hotspots' to better survival

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:26 am
    Scientists have developed a new test that can predict the survival chances of women with breast cancer by analyzing images of 'hotspots' where there has been a fierce immune reaction to a tumor. Researchers used statistical software previously used in criminology studies of crime hotspots to track the extent to which the immune system was homing in and attacking breast cancer cells.
  • Novel gene variants discovered in a difficult childhood immune disorder

    26 Feb 2015 | 12:45 pm
    Genomics researchers analyzing common variable immunodeficiency disease (CVID) in children have discovered links to a gene crucial to the body's defense against infections. The finding may represent an inviting target for drug treatment.
  • Marshaling the body's own weapons against psoriasis

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:16 am
    A three-character code brings relief to patients with psoriasis and sheds light on complex immunoregulation processes: IL-4, an abbreviation for the endogenous signaling molecule Interleukin 4. The substance's ability to inhibit inflammation is well known, but its mechanism of action was not fully understood. Scientists have now shown in an animal model and in a study on patients how IL-4 helps against psoriasis at the molecular level.
  • Early signs in young children predict type 1 diabetes

    26 Feb 2015 | 5:47 am
    It is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes, new research indicates. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the body’s own insulin cells.
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • New compounds protect nervous system from the structural damage characteristic of multiple sclerosis

    27 Feb 2015 | 3:10 pm
    A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study. Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the brain and spinal cord, where for unknown reasons, the body's immune system begins an inflammatory attack against myelin, the protective nerve coating that surrounds nerve fibers. Once myelin is stripped from these fibers, the nerve cells become highly susceptible to damage, which is believed to underlie their destruction, leading to the steady clinical decline seen in progressive…
  • Reviving drugs with anti-stroke potential, minus side effects

    27 Feb 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Scientists have found NMDA receptor antagonists that can limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke, apparently without the pronounced side effects seen with similar drugs. Now researchers have found a potential path around this obstacle, they report.
  • Study challenges theory on unconscious memory system in the brain

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:27 am
    A long-accepted scientific theory about the role the hippocampus plays in our unconscious memory is being challenged by new research. For decades, scientists have theorized that this part of the brain is not involved in processing unconscious memory, the type that allows us to do things like button a shirt without having to think about it.
  • Neurons controlling appetite made from skin cells

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:25 am
    Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity.
  • Left or right? The brain knows before you move

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:24 am
    A neural circuit that connects motor planning to movement has been identified by researchers. The study, the researchers say, explains why injuries that disrupt the brain's ability to carry out movement planning typically impair a person's ability to make movements on just one side of his or her body.
 
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