Anatomy

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  • Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. According to researchers, this branching allows first-order tactile neurons not only to send signals to the brain that something has touched the skin, but also process geometric data about the object touching the skin.
  • War between bacteria, phages benefits humans

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:22 am
    In our battle with cholera bacteria, we may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. Researchers report that phages can force cholera bacteria, even during active infection in humans, to give up their virulence in order to survive.
  • Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:34 am
    When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
  • The Trials and Tribulations of Homo floresiensis: A Quick Introduction

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    These Bones Of Mine
    1 Sep 2014 | 1:14 pm
    I haven’t wrote about palaeoanthropology much recently, but I have been meaning to write about Homo floresiensis for a while now.  The diminutive hominin, most likely a new Homo species although this is still debated, was discovered by chance on the Indonesian island of Flores in 2003 during the excavation of the Liang Bua cave site, which was led by the now sadly deceased New Zealand archaeologist Mike Morwood (Brown et al. 2004).  The team that excavated at Liang Bua cave found the remains for a probable 12 separate H. floresiensis individuals dating from around 95,000 years ago…
  • Vaccine for Ebola? Experts answer questions

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:53 pm
    To learn more about this outbreak and the creation of new human vaccines, infectious disease experts who have led vaccine studies for such global pathogens as cholera, West Nile virus, dengue, typhoid fever and anthrax speak to reporters and answer questions.
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    Anatomy News

  • Autopsy: Man died of heart attack at beach

    2 Sep 2014 | 8:16 pm
    … heart attack, an autopsy found yesterday. An autopsy on the body of … were contacted and a district medical officer pronounced him dead on …
  • Bariatric Surgery Is Booming - Is It Needed?

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:46 pm
    … professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Even as … at Group Health Research Institute. Credit: Group Health Research Institute The BMJ … techniques. Bariatric surgery changes the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract to …
  • Life After Death

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:18 pm
    … for medical research and putting Virginia's State Anatomical Program … chemicals. On the four hospital beds in front of … College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, bodies forgo … s anatomy chair. Boaz dissected a limb, and the anatomist jumped. …
  • Lakshmipuram cab driver was subjected to torture: Autopsy report

    2 Sep 2014 | 5:36 pm
    … ,” said an official source. The autopsy report has allegedly given a … placed under suspension. Meanwhile, the autopsy report of scrap dealer Mubarak … to Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, where he was declared …
  • Global Health Leader Dr. Beracochea of MIDEGO Shares "What to Do to Stop the Ebola Epidemic and Other Diseases as Well"

    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Dr. Elvira Beracochea, MIDEGO CEO, shares her thoughts on the current Ebola crisis and how it relates to global health. FAIRFAX, VA, UNITED STATES, September 2, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Epidemics are not the problem but the symptom of a larger problem: …
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • War between bacteria, phages benefits humans

    2 Sep 2014 | 6:22 am
    In our battle with cholera bacteria, we may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. Researchers report that phages can force cholera bacteria, even during active infection in humans, to give up their virulence in order to survive.
  • Scientists call for investigation of mysterious cloud-like collections in cells

    1 Sep 2014 | 7:23 am
    About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do -- even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment. Now, researchers are issuing a call to investigators to focus their attention on the role of these formations.
  • Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations

    1 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. According to researchers, this branching allows first-order tactile neurons not only to send signals to the brain that something has touched the skin, but also process geometric data about the object touching the skin.
  • Vaccine for Ebola? Experts answer questions

    29 Aug 2014 | 2:53 pm
    To learn more about this outbreak and the creation of new human vaccines, infectious disease experts who have led vaccine studies for such global pathogens as cholera, West Nile virus, dengue, typhoid fever and anthrax speak to reporters and answer questions.
  • Assortativity signatures of transcription factor networks contribute to robustness

    29 Aug 2014 | 7:32 am
    The type and number of connections in transcription factor networks (TFNs) have been studied to evaluate the role assortativity plays on robustness. The study found that the assortativity signature contributes to a network’s resilience against mutations. Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that initiate and regulate the expression of a gene. To achieve their genetic mission, TFs also regulate one another’s expression.
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Do You Even Lift, Bro?

    sinkhership
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:31 pm
    Listen to me talk about some research behind exercise! Lifting weights is fun, safe and healthy. Learn about some exercise myths and the science behind getting big. 
  • How Many Colors Can We See?

    Polymathically
    13 Aug 2014 | 1:01 pm
    More than you’d think, less than you’d hope. SciShow breaks it down.
  • 4 Simple Daily Tweaks to Reduce Inflammation

    bloomingbalanceblog
    13 Aug 2014 | 4:11 am
    Via Mother Earth Living (July/August 2014) By Valerie Latona Eating whole foods, avoiding sugar and highly processed foods, and maintaining a healthy weight are all keys to fighting chronic inflammation. A healthy diet goes a long way, but add in these simple everyday changes and you can help get inflammation under control for years to come. To find other remedies for inflammation, see 9 Foods that Reduce Inflammation. • Get more sleep: Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta found that sleep deprivation or poor sleep quality raises inflammation in the body.
  • Branchial NH4 +-dependent acid–base transport mechanisms and energy metabolism of squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) affected by seawater acidification

    luiseheinrich
    13 Aug 2014 | 1:00 am
    Background Cephalopods have evolved strong acid–base regulatory abilities to cope with CO2 induced p
  • Training Tuesday: Tempo-rary insanity

    marathonsam
    12 Aug 2014 | 7:29 pm
    Bounteous tidings dear readers on this titillating Tuesday. I’m not sure what the weather is like where you are, but it has been a SCORCHER in Seattle this week. Does El Nino have something to do with this? The super-moon? Yesterday evening’s thunderstorm was a welcome respite from the oppressive heat and humidity for us city slickers in Seattle. However, the lightning set 51 new wildfires aflame in Oregon, and at least one new fire near Olympia in Washington. My heart goes out to the people displaced from their homes, and to the firefighters continuing to battle blazes across…
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • What to do for blood pressure in the "grey zone", 120–139/80–89 mm? Try DASH diet

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Dr. Nissen from the Cleveland Clinic recommends to try the DASH diet. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet based on high intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, low-fat dairy products, and whole grains, and low intake of sodium, sweetened beverages, and red and processed meats. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet has been shown to lower blood pressure, but little is known about its long-term effect on cardiovascular end points. In this 2008 study, adherence to the DASH-style diet was associated with a lower risk of CHD and stroke among…
  • Schistosomiasis (bilharzia) - 2014 Lancet review

    7 Aug 2014 | 6:30 am
    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Schistosomiasis: Ending the Anguish of a Silent Disease - The Carter Center video.Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily. The eggs must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce an immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes:Systemic effects-…
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) - DocMikeEvans animation video

    30 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Dr. Mike Evans is founder of the Health Design Lab at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, an Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of Toronto, and a staff physician at St. Michael's Hospital.Written and Narrated by Dr. Mike Evans. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • National Library of Medicine, world's largest medical library, was a shelf of books in Surgeon General office in 1818

    29 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world, started in 1818 as a shelf of books the office of the Surgeon General The National Library of Medicine, the largest medical library in the world, began in 1818 as the US Army Medical Library, in Washington, DC, essentially a shelf of books in the office of Joseph Lovell, then Surgeon General and the head of the Army Medical Department. By the time of the Civil War the book collection consisted of about 2000 volumes and, no longer fitting in the office, was moved to a bank building.The library, then as now, was constantly…
  • Top medicine articles for July 2014

    23 Jul 2014 | 7:38 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:Migraines Linked to Increased Risk of 'Silent Strokes' http://buff.ly/1hTE5RuDoctor’s Salaries Are Not the Big Cost - NYTimes http://buff.ly/QWe2lx -- "There is a startling secret behind America’s health care hierarchy: Physicians, the most highly trained members in the industry’s work force, are on average right in the middle of the compensation pack. That is because the biggest bucks are currently earned not through the delivery of care, but from overseeing the business of medicine.The base pay of insurance…
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Acute cardiopulmonary effects induced by the inhalation of concentrated ambient particles during seasonal variation in the city of Sao Paulo

    de Brito, J. M., Macchione, M., Yoshizaki, K., Toledo-Arruda, A. C., Saraiva-Romanholo, B. M., Andrade, M. d. F., Mauad, T., Rivero, D. H. R. F., Saldiva, P. H. N.
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:01 am
    Ambient particles may undergo modifications to their chemical composition as a consequence of climatic variability. The determination of whether these changes modify the toxicity of the particles is important for the understanding of the health effects associated with particle exposure. The objectives were to determine whether low levels of particles promote cardiopulmonary effects, and to assess if the observed alterations are influenced by season. Mice were exposed to 200 μg/m3 concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) and filtered air (FA) in cold/dry and warm/humid periods. Lung…
  • Cardiac function is preserved following 4 weeks of voluntary wheel running in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease

    Kuczmarski, J. M., Martens, C. R., Kim, J., Lennon-Edwards, S. L., Edwards, D. G.
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:01 am
    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running on cardiac performance in the 5/6 ablation-infarction (AI) rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We hypothesized that voluntary wheel running would be effective in preserving cardiac function in AI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three study groups: 1) sham, sedentary nondiseased control; 2) AI-SED, sedentary AI; and 3) AI-WR, wheel-running AI. Animals were maintained over a total period of 8 wk following AI and sham surgery. The 8-wk period included 4 wk of disease development…
  • Murine pressure overload models: a 30-MHz look brings a whole new "sound" into data interpretation

    Hermans, H., Swinnen, M., Pokreisz, P., Caluwe, E., Dymarkowski, S., Herregods, M.-C., Janssens, S., Herijgers, P.
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:01 am
    Transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and angiotensin II (ANG II) subcutaneous osmotic pump infusion are frequently used murine models of pressure overload hypertrophy. The aim of this paper is to investigate time- and stressor-dependent functional and structural changes using echocardiographic B-mode, M-mode, and Doppler characterization. Ten-week-old male C57BL6/J wild-type mice received 4-wk ANG II (1.5 mg·kg–1·day–1, n = 19) or saline (n = 10) infusion followed by echocardiography (Vevo2100, Visual Sonics), or underwent TAC (n = 63) or a sham operation (n = 30).
  • A novel ultrasound technique to measure genioglossus movement in vivo

    Kwan, B. C. H., Butler, J. E., Hudson, A. L., McKenzie, D. K., Bilston, L. E., Gandevia, S. C.
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:01 am
    Upper airway muscles are important in maintaining airway patency. Visualization of their dynamic motion should allow measurement, comparison, and further understanding of their roles in healthy subjects and those with upper airway disorders. Currently, there are few clinically feasible real-time imaging methods. Methods such as tagged magnetic resonance imaging have documented movement of genioglossus (GG), the largest upper airway dilator. Inspiratory movement was largest in the posterior region of GG. This study aimed to develop a novel ultrasound (US) method to measure GG movement in real…
  • Differential regulation of the fiber type-specific gene expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase isoforms induced by exercise training

    Morissette, M. P., Susser, S. E., Stammers, A. N., O'Hara, K. A., Gardiner, P. F., Sheppard, P., Moffatt, T. L., Duhamel, T. A.
    1 Sep 2014 | 9:01 am
    The regulatory role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α2 on sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) 1a and SERCA2a in different skeletal muscle fiber types has yet to be elucidated. Sedentary (Sed) or exercise-trained (Ex) wild-type (WT) and AMPKα2-kinase dead (KD) transgenic mice, which overexpress a mutated and inactivated AMPKα2 subunit, were utilized to characterize how genotype or exercise training influenced the regulation of SERCA isoforms in gastrocnemius. As expected, both Sed and Ex KD mice had >40% lower AMPK phosphorylation and…
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    MedPage Today Cardiovascular

  • ESC: Studies Support Measuring Flow in CAD, MI (CME/CE)

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:26 pm
    BARCELONA (MedPage Today) -- For patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), stenting based on fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement leads to better outcomes than medical therapy alone, researchers reported here.
  • Visceral Fat and Hypertension: A Link?

    2 Sep 2014 | 1:28 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- Visceral adipose tissue, rather than body mass index or overall subcutaneous fat, was associated with the development of hypertension, researchers found.
  • ESC: Xarelto Safe for Cardioverting Afib

    2 Sep 2014 | 11:19 am
    BARCELONA (MedPage Today) -- Switching atrial fibrillation patients awaiting elective cardioversion to rivaroxaban (Xarelto) was as safe as warfarin in that setting.
  • ESC: NO Therapy Fails to Prevent Reperfusion Injury

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:33 am
    BARCELONA (MedPage Today) -- Heart attack patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions who inhale nitric oxide before and during the procedures did not appear to benefit in controlling the size of reperfusion injury, researchers reported here.
  • Low Carb Beats Low Fat for Weight Loss, CV Risk (CME/CE)

    1 Sep 2014 | 2:00 pm
    (MedPage Today) -- For weight loss and for reducing cardiovascular risk, cutting down on carbs was a more effective strategy than limiting fat intake in a randomized trial, researchers found.
 
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    Digestive System News

  • Renew yourself inside and out this Spring

    2 Sep 2014 | 9:45 pm
    … to a radiant complexion. Good gut health is the key to glowing … rich in enzymes to aid digestion. Juicing is great but … oil. (If pregnant, consult a health practitioner before using essential … foods and replacing them with healthier options: oat based cereal …
  • Poor sleep linked to suicide

    2 Sep 2014 | 5:35 pm
    … manipulating cravings and mood, digestive tract bacteria may … gut microbiome, the system of microbes in the digestive tract, … Association, which represents local health and nutrition programs … note positive and long-lasting health protections are strongest …
  • Global Health Leader Dr. Beracochea of MIDEGO Shares "What to Do to Stop the Ebola Epidemic and Other Diseases as Well"

    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Dr. Elvira Beracochea, MIDEGO CEO, shares her thoughts on the current Ebola crisis and how it relates to global health. FAIRFAX, VA, UNITED STATES, September 2, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Epidemics are not the problem but the symptom of a larger problem: …
  • Five ways with apple cider vinegar

    2 Sep 2014 | 4:29 pm
    … credibility thanks to its health benefits. Arabella Forge shares … that is beneficial for digestion. Compared to other vinegars … Excessive consumption may cause digestive problems and stomach upset. Storage Apple … are sold at most health food stores (they are …
  • Vascular Interventional Radiography Text and Examination Review Book 2nd Edition Edited and Updated!

    2 Sep 2014 | 3:02 pm
    New VI Radiography Text Book & Examination Review Book Second Edition for Radiography professionals, V.I. Special Techs want to take ARRT V.I. Registry exam. PEMBROKE PINES, FLORIDA, USA, August 22, 2014 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Pembroke Pines, Florida …
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    Gastrointestinal Tract News

  • bioMérieux - First-Half 2014 Results

    2 Sep 2014 | 10:01 pm
    … respiratory, blood culture ID and gastrointestinal - all of which are … products. In particular, the FilmArray® gastrointestinal (GI) panel received FDA 510 … . It is the most comprehensive gastrointestinal test to be cleared by …
  • Bariatric Surgery Is Booming - Is It Needed?

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:46 pm
    … changes the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract to promote weight loss …
  • Global Markets and Technologies for Advanced Drug Delivery Systems

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:25 pm
    … GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEMS 156 MARKET REVENUE 157 TABLE 92 GLOBAL MARKET FOR GASTROINTESTINAL … FIGURE 61 GLOBAL MARKET FOR GASTROINTESTINAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, 2011-2018 ($ MILLIONS … GLOBAL SHARE OF REGIONS IN GASTROINTESTINAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, 2012 (%) 158 …
  • Bariatric Surgery: Global Markets for Services and Devices

    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 pm
    … SURGERY 51 PULMONARY EMBOLISM 51 GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT LEAK 52 BOWEL OBSTRUCTION … SOCIETY 175 SOCIETY OF AMERICAN GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPIC SURGEONS (SAGES) 175 SOCIETY …
  • Stomach Problems Cut Success of Autism Drugs

    2 Sep 2014 | 6:34 pm
    … autistic children and adults suffer gastrointestinal symptoms that could potentially influence … between gastrointestinal symptoms and the success of autism medications. If gastrointestinal symptoms … response but given how common gastrointestinal issues are for those with …
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Revealing novel mode of action for osteoporosis drug

    29 Aug 2014 | 10:54 am
    Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
  • Are cigarette substitutes safe alternative? Depends on user habits

    28 Aug 2014 | 2:00 pm
    A recent literature review study suggests that small dosages of nicotine found in cigarette substitutes could be harmful to human musculoskeletal system, due to overuse. The researchers investigated and summarized the last five years of studies, on the effect of nicotine on wound and skeletal healing processes in humans.
  • Lifetime of fitness: Fountain of youth for bone, joint health?

    27 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging. "An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates that we can modulate age-related decline in the musculoskeletal system," said the lead study author.. "A lot of the deterioration we see with aging can be attributed to a more sedentary lifestyle instead of aging itself."
  • Attacking a rare disease at its source with gene therapy

    26 Aug 2014 | 5:53 pm
    The two main treatments for MPS I are bone marrow transplantation and intravenous enzyme replacement therapy, but these are only marginally effective or clinically impractical, especially when the disease strikes the central nervous system. Using an animal model, a team has proven the efficacy of a more elegant way to restore aberrant protein levels in the body through direct gene transfer.
  • Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

    26 Aug 2014 | 11:25 am
    Each year, more than 300,000 Americans, primarily adults over age 65, sustain a hip fracture, a debilitating injury that can diminish life quality and expectancy. A new study found that average lifetime societal benefits in the U.S. reduced the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 per patient (in 2009 dollars), and that total, lifetime societal savings exceeded $16 billion for older patients.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Understanding, improving body's fight against pathogens

    2 Sep 2014 | 8:50 am
    The crucial role of two signalling molecules, DOK3 and SHP1, in the development and production of plasma cells has been uncovered by researchers. These discoveries advance the understanding of plasma cells and the antibody response, and may lead to optimization of vaccine development and improved treatment for patients with autoimmune diseases such as lupus and tumors such as multiple myeloma.
  • Over-the-counter pain reliever may restore immune function in old age

    2 Sep 2014 | 8:47 am
    New research involving mice suggests that the key to more youthful immune function might already be in your medicine cabinet. Scientists have shown that macrophages from the lungs of old mice had different responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis than macrophages from young mice, but these changes were reversed by ibuprofen.
  • Carcinogenic role of protein in liver decoded

    1 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    The human protein EGFR controls cell growth. It has mutated in case of many cancer cells or exists in excessive numbers. For this reason it serves as a point of attack for target-oriented therapies. A study group has now discovered that the risk of this protein does not -- as previously assumed -- depend on its presence within the tumor cell, but rather from its activity in the cells adjacent to the tumor.
  • Surprising discovery: HIV hides in gut, evading eradication

    29 Aug 2014 | 2:54 pm
    Some surprising discoveries about the body's initial responses to HIV infection have been made by researchers. One of the biggest obstacles to complete viral eradication and immune recovery is the stable HIV reservoir in the gut. There is very little information about the early viral invasion and the establishment of the gut reservoir. “We want to understand what enables the virus to invade the gut, cause inflammation and kill the immune cells,” said the study's lead author.
  • Vaccine for Ebola? Experts answer questions

    29 Aug 2014 | 2:53 pm
    To learn more about this outbreak and the creation of new human vaccines, infectious disease experts who have led vaccine studies for such global pathogens as cholera, West Nile virus, dengue, typhoid fever and anthrax speak to reporters and answer questions.
 
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain

    2 Sep 2014 | 6:34 am
    When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
  • Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations

    1 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from many highly-sensitive zones on the skin. According to researchers, this branching allows first-order tactile neurons not only to send signals to the brain that something has touched the skin, but also process geometric data about the object touching the skin.
  • How Alzheimer's peptides shut down cellular powerhouses

    29 Aug 2014 | 5:38 am
    New mechanisms of the brain disease have been discovered by biochemists who have identified a failing in the work of nerve cells. They report how Alzheimer's disease damages mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, and suspect this to be the cause of premature death of nerve cells that occurs in the course of the disease.
  • Mouse model provides window into working brain

    28 Aug 2014 | 3:47 pm
    A protein marker that mice carry and reacts to different calcium levels allows many different cell types to be studied in a new way. This mouse model is a genetically engineered line of mice that is expected to open the door to new research on epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and other diseases.
  • From bite site to brain: How rabies virus hijacks and speeds up transport in nerve cells

    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    Rabies is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal into muscle tissue of the new host. From there, the virus travels all the way to the brain where it multiplies and causes the usually fatal disease. A new article sheds light on how the virus hijacks the transport system in nerve cells to reach the brain with maximal speed and efficiency.
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