Anatomy

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  • In landmark study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Nov 2014 | 11:12 am
    Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery. Their conclusion? Patients who receive more cells get significant benefits.
  • Denosumab reverses bone loss, lowers wrist fracture rates in women with osteoporosis

    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily
    16 Nov 2014 | 6:40 am
    Denosumab (Prolia®, Xgeva®) reversed cortical bone loss and increased bone mineral density, lowering wrist fracture rates in women with osteoporosis, according to new research. Osteoporosis is a common condition where bones become weak, affecting both men and women, mainly as they grow older. Osteoporosis results from a loss of bone mass, measured as bone density, and from a change in bone structure. Osteoporosis can increase fracture risk. Risk factors for developing osteoporosis include a sedentary lifestyle, use of glucocorticoids, smoking and having inflammatory arthritis, among others.
  • Mental disorders due to permanent stress?

    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:29 am
    Activated through permanent stress, immune cells will have a damaging effect on and cause changes to the brain. This may result in mental disorders. Medical researchers are studying the effects of permanent stress on the immune system.
  • Breast cancer survivors benefit from exercise therapy, acupuncture

    Lymphology/Lymphedema News From Medical News Today
    6 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    Two new studies from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain and...
  • Tapeworm found living inside a patient's brain: Worm removed and sequenced

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Nov 2014 | 5:45 pm
    A genome of a rare species of tapeworm found living inside a patient's brain has been sequenced for the first time. The study provides insights into potential drug targets within the genome for future treatments.
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Cohesin: Cherry-shaped molecule safeguards cell division

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    A cohesin molecule ensures the proper distribution of DNA during cell division. Scientists can now demonstrate the concept of its carabiner-like function by visualizing for the first time the open form of the complex.
  • Tapeworm found living inside a patient's brain: Worm removed and sequenced

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:45 pm
    A genome of a rare species of tapeworm found living inside a patient's brain has been sequenced for the first time. The study provides insights into potential drug targets within the genome for future treatments.
  • How mutant gene can cause deafness

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:45 pm
    Scientists have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies. "This raises hopes that we could, in principle, use gene-therapy approaches to restore function in hair cells and thus develop new treatment options for hearing loss," said the senior author of the new study.
  • First inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers created

    20 Nov 2014 | 3:36 pm
    Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. Now scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.
  • Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease

    20 Nov 2014 | 11:16 am
    Found in South America and sub-Saharan Africa, each year yellow fever results in 200,000 new cases and kills 30,000 people. About 900 million people are at risk of contracting the disease. Now a research team has determined that the yellow fever virus, a hemorrhagic fever virus, replicates primarily in the liver; other organ failures that often follow in people with the disease are due to secondary effects.
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    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • Quilled Paper Anatomical Cross Sections

    deesyx
    22 Nov 2014 | 12:12 am
    Head detail Female detail Head and torso This is Tissues Series, quilled paper human anatomy sculptures, done by visual artist Lisa Nelson. Nelson graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a degree in illustration. More recently, she attended her local technical school’s medical assisting program because she has always had an interest in anatomy. Then she created this Tissues Series by combining her artistic background with her life-long interest in human anatomy. Quilling is a centuries old form of art done by rolling and shaping strip of paper and place them side by side to create…
  • In Him (Christ) Lie Hidden All The Treasures of Wisdom and Knowledge

    K Simpson Author
    18 Nov 2014 | 7:50 am
      In Him (Christ)lie hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge; God’s calling, will you answer? One of the driving forces behind writing the book, “Facts Your Way to Heaven – From religion to relationship,” was to steer people away from man and his religious philosophy and limited insight of life as we know it, considering we are the created, not the Creator. In addition, yours truly was motivated in hopes that man would begin to see a clear distinction of what is missing in his life today, and in his current belief system, as he finds himself chasing after…
  • CRYDER'S: MUSCLE TUTORIAL AND SELF-QUIZ PowerPoint

    MyAnatomyMentor
    17 Nov 2014 | 2:00 am
    cryders-muscles-tutorial-quiz
  • INTERACTIVE PHYSIOLOGY: Nervous System Animations

    MyAnatomyMentor
    16 Nov 2014 | 10:25 am
    NERVOUS SYSTEM (CNS/ PNS) INTERACTIVE PHYSIOLOGY: ION CHANNELS INTERACTIVE PHYSIOLOGY: MEMBRANE POTENTIAL INTERACTIVE PHYSIOLOGY: ACTION POTENTIAL
  • CRYDER'S: MUSCLE (CH. 9 &10) POWERPOINT (with labeled cat dissection images)

    MyAnatomyMentor
    15 Nov 2014 | 10:10 am
    Metabolism image Muscle chapter 9-10fixed rivised
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • Counseling for Admission in PG medical seats begins for 2015 session

    Trump
    13 Nov 2014 | 1:52 am
    Counseling for Admission in PG medical seats begins for 2015 session MD MS MDS Direct Admission 2015 In India, Maharashtra – Karnataka through Management Quota. Postgraduate MD MS Admission 2015 seats In India through management quota. We provide admission guidance in Pg MD, MS, and MDS & MBBS in Private Medical Colleges in India. Call 9739366036 / 9742479101 / 9632226036 / 08042173206 Get PG medical (MD-MS) Admission 2015 in Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad (Through Management) Quota. Get PG medical (MD-MS) Admission 2015 in Mahatma Gandhi Mission Medical College, Navi…
  • AIIMS Bhubenswar to hire 24 senior doctors starting Nov 15

    medicalstamp
    12 Nov 2014 | 8:59 pm
    All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Bhubaneswar will start hirirng senior resident doctor across various departments from November 15. The format of hiring is walk-in-interviews but it will conduct written test if there are more aspirants than vacant position. AIIMS is looking for senior residents in Forensic Med/Toxicology, Radio Diagnosis, Anaesthesiology, Medicine (Nephrology/Cardiology/Neurology), Paediatrics (Neonatology), Dermatology , Orthopaedics , Anatomy, Physiology , Community Medicine & Family Medicine and  Psychiatry. Upper age limit for the vacant post is 33 for…
  • Today in Science History: 12th November

    ashleysheff
    12 Nov 2014 | 6:06 am
    1935 – The first modern surgery of the frontal lobes of the brain was conducted by Egas Moniz in Portugal. Moniz received the idea for this radical surgery after attending a conference in which the effects of removing the frontal lobes from a chimpanzee were discussed. He had been speculating on the causes of mental illnesses and despite having no concrete evidence, he had latched onto the idea that neurones (the cells – especially in the brain – which carry electrical ‘messages’ in the body) in mentally ill patients were “sticky“, causing them to…
  • PG dental –MDS Degree through Best Colleges of Bangalore

    Trump
    12 Nov 2014 | 3:13 am
    PG dental –MDS Degree through Best Colleges of Bangalore Admission in MDS through Management Quota in Top Colleges of Bangalore Admission in MDS through Management Quota Contact right away @ 9739366036 / 9742479101 / 9632226036 / 08042173206 If you are looking for direct admission in MDS Course under Management/NRI Quota in Top Colleges of Karnataka, You are definitely at right Place. We will help you to secure admission in best college available in your budget. Master of Dental Surgery (MDS) is a postgraduate Dentistry course. This can be followed after successful completion of BDS. The…
  • PG Medical admission 2015-16 in top Medical Colleges through Management Quota

    Trump
    12 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    PG Medical admission 2015-16 in top Medical Colleges through Management Quota Get Direct Admission in PG Medical (MD/MS) – Dental (BDS/MDS) for 2015-16 Session through Management /NRI / Foreign Quota in top colleges across India. MD MS MDS seats in India for 2015-16 session booking has started in advance. Call Alpita – 9739366036, Ankit – 9742479101, Shekhar – 9632226036, 08042173206 & get appropriate information for admission guidelines. If you are looking to obtain book confirmed seat for MBBS, MD, MS, PG, BDS, MDS, BAMS, Diploma Admission Booking @Lowest Package, Contact at…
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    Physiology physics woven fine

  • Innocentive NASA Challenge: Medical Consumables Tracking

    Amiya Sarkar
    20 Nov 2014 | 1:14 pm
    As I am not authorized to share the details of the challenge, as per the agreement signed by me, I am sharing the overall structure of the problem here. Once you are through you may now look for the solution that I submitted, some more than 4 years ago. I am omitting "My Solution: • Introduction and Background: " part; as it may divulge  information from the challenge itself, which is prohibited. The below portion has not been altered post-submission, even though I could find many faults looking back. [I particularly could better have…
  • Innocentive Theoretical Challenge: Heart Implantation of a Medical Device

    Amiya Sarkar
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:35 am
    I must say that I am not authorized to share the details of the challenge, as per the agreement signed by me. Yet you can have a glimpse of the overall structure of the problem here. Once you have seen the salient points you may now look for the solution that I submitted to them way back in 2010. I am free to publish my proposed solution, which also sheds some light on the deeper requirements for the leadless device. However, I am omitting "My Solution: • Introduction and Background: " part, as it may divulge  information from the challenge itself.
  • Revisiting the Sternocleidomastoids: Accessory Muscles of Respiration

    Amiya Sarkar
    6 Feb 2014 | 1:20 pm
    We know that sternocleidomastoids (strap muscles of the neck), scalene muscles and alae nasi are considered accessory muscles of breathing, although some controversy exists. If you saw an asthmatic individual in his desperate attempts at breathing or an agitated person or a person exercising vigorously, you could watch these muscles in action. However, that wasn't exactly what I had in mind while I was doing this experiment. I was really thrilled to chance upon it. Kind of a serendipitous discovery in its own right. You too can figure this out easily. The placement of the surface…
  • Making a Human Interface Device Using SpikerBox

    Amiya Sarkar
    6 Feb 2014 | 11:56 am
    Q said to Bond: It's activated by nerve impulses from the wrist muscles. This dialog from the 1979 James Bond movie, Moonraker, seems to fit into place when we talk about interfacing biosignals (surface EMG, in this case) with an actuator. [Watch a clip from the movie below] In order to achieve this human-machine interface using our good not-so-old spikerbox, we need to estimate the output signal amplitude coming from the extensors of the wrist (around 5 mV), amplify the signal by some 300 times by cascading two LM 386 IC (or any opamp taking care that the device doesn't go into…
  • Surface EMG from Thumb: Strongly 'Opposed' ?

    Amiya Sarkar
    6 Feb 2014 | 11:18 am
    Lead placement for the experiment, as shown on the right.As I have already mentioned, the ground electrode sits atopthe manubrium sterni, on the upper chest (breastbone).The camera recording is shown below. You can see the Piezoelectric crystal's spark and also hear its sound on snapping. However, I haven't yet had time to analyze if the spark did contribute some 'useful' static on the trace (open & watch this .wav file in BYB software).Method: Pressing on a piezo crytal (from a cigarette lighter) by 'opposing' the thumb against the base of the little finger (as shown by the figure).
 
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • Leading causes of death in 2030, if we continue down the current path

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    This CDC video provides information about the leading causes of death in the U.S. and where we may be in 2030, if we continue down the current path. It suggests small steps that providers can take now to make a difference in the future health of our nation. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Police officers’ risk of sudden cardiac death is 34-69 times higher during restraints or altercations

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    This BMJ study found that police officers’ risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) was 34 to 69 times higher during restraints or altercations; 32 to 51 times higher during pursuits; 20 to 23 times higher during physical training; and 6 to 9 times higher during medical or rescue operations, as compared with routine or non-emergency activities. The researchers also found that SCD accounts for up to 10% of all U.S. on-duty police deaths.References:Law enforcement duties and sudden cardiac death among police officers in United States: case distribution study. BMJ 2014; 349 doi:…
  • Around the table - National Geographic video

    19 Nov 2014 | 8:36 pm
    Chefs and authors discuss the importance of the communal meal:The Future of Food. Chefs Jose Andres and Barton Seaver talk about the importance of food as a resource and how we can save it: Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • Top medicine articles for November 2014

    17 Nov 2014 | 5:09 am
    A collection of some interesting medical articles published recently:'To Burn Off Calories in This Soda, Walk 5 Miles' - new label http://buff.ly/1vzbCKHTwo new medications for IPF: Pirfenidone (Esbriet) affects scarring, Nintedanib (Ofev) is a kinase inhibitor http://buff.ly/1psam6m80% of people have at least 1 distressing symptom in a given month, yet fewer than 1 in 4 persons sees a doctor. At least one third of common symptoms do not have a clear-cut, disease-based explanation. History and physical examination alone contribute 73% to 94% of the diagnostic information. The patient's…
  • How to Teach Teens to Drive Safely - WSJ video

    13 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Along with parking and steering, parents also need to teach teenagers how to spot crash hazards. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Tanya Rivero discuss some tips. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Time of day affects chemoreflex sensitivity and the carbon dioxide reserve during NREM sleep in participants with sleep apnea

    El-Chami, M., Shaheen, D., Ivers, B., Syed, Z., Badr, M. S., Lin, H.-S., Mateika, J. H.
    15 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
    Our investigation was designed to determine whether the time of day affects the carbon dioxide reserve and chemoreflex sensitivity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Ten healthy men with obstructive sleep apnea completed a constant routine protocol that consisted of sleep sessions in the evening (10 PM to 1 AM), morning (6 AM to 9 AM), and afternoon (2 PM to 5 PM). Between sleep sessions, the participants were awake. During each sleep session, core body temperature, baseline levels of carbon dioxide (PetCO2) and minute ventilation, as well as the PetCO2 that demarcated the apneic…
  • Morning pentraxin3 levels reflect obstructive sleep apnea-related acute inflammation

    Kobukai, Y., Koyama, T., Watanabe, H., Ito, H.
    15 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
    This study investigated morning levels of pentraxin3 (PTX3) as a sensitive biomarker for acute inflammation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A total of 61 consecutive patients with OSA were divided into two groups: non-to-mild (n = 20) and moderate-to-severe (n = 41) OSA based on their apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score. Those patients with moderate-to-severe OSA were further divided into continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treated (n = 21) and non-CPAP-treated (n = 20) groups. Morning and evening serum PTX3 and high-sensitivity (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were…
  • Corrigendum

    15 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
  • Effect of vitamin C on hyperoxia-induced vasoconstriction in exercising skeletal muscle

    Ranadive, S. M., Joyner, M. J., Walker, B. G., Taylor, J. L., Casey, D. P.
    15 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
    Hyperoxia can cause substantial reductions in peripheral and coronary blood flow at rest and during exercise, which may be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during hyperoxia. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ROS in hyperoxia-induced reductions in skeletal muscle blood flow during forearm exercise. We hypothesized that infusion of vitamin C would abolish the effects of hyperoxia on the forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to exercise. Twelve young healthy adults performed rhythmic forearm handgrip exercise (10% of maximum voluntary contraction for 5 min)…
  • Recovery of the pulmonary chemoreflex and functional role of bronchopulmonary C-fibers following chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Lee, K.-Z., Chang, Y.-S.
    15 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
    Persistent impairment of pulmonary defense reflexes is a critical factor contributing to pulmonary complications in patients with spinal cord injuries. The pulmonary chemoreflex evoked by activation of bronchopulmonary C-fibers has been reported to be abolished in animals with acute cervical hemisection (C2Hx). The present study examined whether the pulmonary chemoreflex can recover during the chronic injury phase and investigated the role of bronchopulmonary C-fibers on the altered breathing pattern after C2Hx. In the first protocol, bronchopulmonary C-fibers were excited by intrajugular…
 
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    Digestive System News

  • Learn benefits of giving your dog or cat pumpkin

    24 Nov 2014 | 11:38 am
    … and minerals. There are many health benefits to this simple … advantages to animals and humans, health wise. Some of the … kitty more easily process the digestive system while helping eliminate fur … can relieve such issues like stomach distress as a result …
  • Iron deficiency, even mild anemia, can be good for health

    24 Nov 2014 | 11:31 am
    … balance of bacteria in the gut can be upset. As Drakesmith … the “good” bugs that help digestion, don’t require iron to … — decreased cancer risk among otherwise healthy people with peripheral arterial disease …
  • Cataloguing 10 Million Human Gut Microbial Genes: Unparalleled Accomplishment

    24 Nov 2014 | 11:18 am
    … on bacteria in the digestive tract (gut microbiome) has confirmed the major role they play in our health … new sequencing technologies. The gut microbiome, which scientists … of imbalances in the gut microbiome (dysbiosis), particularly …
  • Cataloguing 10 Million Human Gut Microbial Genes

    24 Nov 2014 | 10:54 am
    … on bacteria in the digestive tract (gut microbiome) has confirmed the major role they play in our health … new sequencing technologies. The gut microbiome, which scientists … of imbalances in the gut microbiome (dysbiosis), particularly …
  • Know the Facts About GERD

    24 Nov 2014 | 10:02 am
    … stomach and the esophagus to close properly. The backwash of stomach … as diabetes mellitus, delayed stomach emptying, asthma, connective … OTC) medications that control stomach acid. For more … advancing patient care and digestive health by promoting excellence …
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • In landmark study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference

    21 Nov 2014 | 11:12 am
    Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery. Their conclusion? Patients who receive more cells get significant benefits.
  • Brain injuries in mice treated using bone marrow stem cells, antioxidants

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:29 am
    For the first time, researchers have transplanted bone marrow stem cells into damaged brain tissue while applying lipoic acid (a potent antioxidant), with the aim of improving neuroregeneration in the tissue. This new way of repairing brain damage, which combines cellular treatment with drug therapy, has shown positive results, especially in forming blood vessels (a process called angiogenesis) in damaged areas of the brains of adult laboratory mice.
  • Laboratory breakthrough offers promise for spinal cord injury patients to breathe on their own again

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:13 am
    A procedure that restores function to muscles that control breathing – even when they have been paralyzed for more than a year -- has been developed by researchers. The breakthrough offers hope that patients with severe spinal cord injuries will be able to breathe again on their own.
  • Infection-fighting B cells go with the flow

    17 Nov 2014 | 6:33 am
    Newly formed B cells take the easy way out when it comes to exiting the bone marrow, according to researchers. Why immune cells use different exit strategies in different organs is not completely clear. But the authors suggest that the go-with-the-flow strategy of the bone marrow may be due to its role in the production of red blood cells, which do not express molecules required for active crawling.
  • Denosumab reverses bone loss, lowers wrist fracture rates in women with osteoporosis

    16 Nov 2014 | 6:40 am
    Denosumab (Prolia®, Xgeva®) reversed cortical bone loss and increased bone mineral density, lowering wrist fracture rates in women with osteoporosis, according to new research. Osteoporosis is a common condition where bones become weak, affecting both men and women, mainly as they grow older. Osteoporosis results from a loss of bone mass, measured as bone density, and from a change in bone structure. Osteoporosis can increase fracture risk. Risk factors for developing osteoporosis include a sedentary lifestyle, use of glucocorticoids, smoking and having inflammatory arthritis, among others.
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Possibilities for personalized vaccines

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:59 am
    Medical researchers are considering the possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer. The first vaccine will be prepared from a warehouse of 72 targets previously identified by the researchers as relevant for treatment in glioblastoma.
  • Mental disorders due to permanent stress?

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:29 am
    Activated through permanent stress, immune cells will have a damaging effect on and cause changes to the brain. This may result in mental disorders. Medical researchers are studying the effects of permanent stress on the immune system.
  • Teasing out glitches in immune system's self-recognition

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:27 am
    In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.
  • Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease

    20 Nov 2014 | 11:16 am
    Found in South America and sub-Saharan Africa, each year yellow fever results in 200,000 new cases and kills 30,000 people. About 900 million people are at risk of contracting the disease. Now a research team has determined that the yellow fever virus, a hemorrhagic fever virus, replicates primarily in the liver; other organ failures that often follow in people with the disease are due to secondary effects.
  • An Ebola virus protein can cause massive inflammation and leaky blood vessels

    20 Nov 2014 | 11:16 am
    Ebola GP protein covers the virus' surface and is shed from infected cells during infection. Shed GP can trigger massive dysregulation of the immune response and affect the permeability of blood vessels.
 
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studied for stroke rehab

    21 Nov 2014 | 7:25 am
    Researchers are trying to help patients who have suffered a stroke to improve arm movement by stimulating the brain using a device called a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator (TMS). The idea is that when one side of the brain is damaged by a stroke, the healthy side tends to generate much more activity to compensate, but that may actually prevent the injured side from recovering, explains the principal investigator.
  • Brain injuries in mice treated using bone marrow stem cells, antioxidants

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:29 am
    For the first time, researchers have transplanted bone marrow stem cells into damaged brain tissue while applying lipoic acid (a potent antioxidant), with the aim of improving neuroregeneration in the tissue. This new way of repairing brain damage, which combines cellular treatment with drug therapy, has shown positive results, especially in forming blood vessels (a process called angiogenesis) in damaged areas of the brains of adult laboratory mice.
  • Reprogramming 'support cells' into neurons could repair injured adult brains

    20 Nov 2014 | 9:31 am
    The cerebral cortex lacks the ability to replace neurons that die as a result of Alzheimer's, stroke, and other devastating diseases. A new study shows that a Sox2 protein, alone or in combination with another protein, Ascl1, can cause nonneuronal cells, called NG2 glia, to turn into neurons in the injured cerebral cortex of adult mice. The findings reveal that NG2 glia represent a promising target for neuronal cell replacement strategies to treat brain injury.
  • Weight, eating habits in Parkinson's disease

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:21 am
    A review of the scientific literature on Parkinson’s disease shows that even the non-motor symptoms associated with the disease can contribute to the changes in body weight seen in patients (including those subjected to deep brain stimulation). Among the factors affecting eating habits and body weight there could be, for example, an impaired ability to derive pleasure from food and changes in motivation. These are important findings which can help to understand how to reduce these effects of Parkinson’s that exacerbate an already negative clinical situation.
  • New approach for treating ALS: Re-evaluation of older drugs?

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:17 am
    Blocking molecules involved in ALS-drug resistance may improve how well ALS therapeutics work, suggesting that re-evaluation of drugs that appeared to have failed might be appropriate.
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