Anatomy

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  • Head injury causes immune system to attack brain, new study finds

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:04 am
    Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. A new study showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. The authors suggest that if the findings apply to humans, this could help prevent brain damage from accidents, and protect players of contact sports like football, rugby and boxing.
  • Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    19 Oct 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Scientists said that, through additional translational research, the findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.
  • Design of micro, nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:49 am
    Techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Both disorders affect the neurones: their structure and function is lost, and this in turn leads to the deterioration in the patient's motor, cognitive, sensory and emotional functions.
  • Womb-transplant baby phenomenon

    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy
    hquigley95
    8 Oct 2014 | 1:15 pm
    After the first successful womb-transplant effectively held and delivered a baby, more are on their way leading to a 2014/15 baby boom? Research has been going into this area for many years resulting in many failed attempt and miscarriages. The first woman to successfully receive, develop, carry and give birth to a womb transplant baby could not carry a baby herself naturally. Due to a condition of MS, multiple sclerosis her ovaries function normally. Therefore, an elderly family friend donated her uterus to the patient which could then carry her genetically own egg. There is still much…
  • Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily
    19 Oct 2014 | 12:15 pm
    At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research. Mutations in the body's cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless. For some people, genetic changes in blood cells can develop in genes that play roles in initiating leukemia and lymphoma even though such people don't have the blood cancers, scientists report.
 
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    Human Biology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Blind cave fish may provide insight on eye disease, other human health issues

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:04 am
    Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit to teach us about the causes of many human ailments, including those that result in loss of sight. A team of researchers is looking to the tiny eyeless fish for clues about the underpinnings of degenerative eye disease and more.
  • Earlier unknown molecular-level mechanism may contribute to growth rate of breast cancer

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    A previously unknown molecular-level mechanism that may partly explain the increased growth of cancer cells has been discovered by researchers. The study showed that high levels of miRNA-378a-5p molecule cause cell division anomalies. This renders the number of chromosomes in cancer cells abnormal, which is known to promote growth and the spread of cancer.
  • Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer

    20 Oct 2014 | 5:51 am
    A genetic variant common in Latina women protects against breast cancer, an international research collaboration has found. The variant, a difference in just one of the three billion "letters" in the human genome known as a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), originates from indigenous Americans and confers significant protection from breast cancer, particularly the more aggressive estrogen receptor-negative forms of the disease, which generally have a worse prognosis.
  • Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

    19 Oct 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Scientists said that, through additional translational research, the findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.
  • Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

    19 Oct 2014 | 12:15 pm
    At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research. Mutations in the body's cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless. For some people, genetic changes in blood cells can develop in genes that play roles in initiating leukemia and lymphoma even though such people don't have the blood cancers, scientists report.
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    WordPress Tag: Human Anatomy

  • Intention

    emilyanton
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Intention, yes Intention. Intention is what is holding my focus and attention in this moment. Stop and ask yourself: How can I have a crystal clear intention for everything I do, every action I make, every step I take, every word I speak? Life is built around our intentions.  Do you plan to succeed? Do you plan to fail? What great thing would you attempt if you knew you could not fail?” – Robert H. Schuller Every moment is filled with intention, no matter if you mean it to be or not.  And, our intentions are linked to our thoughts. Last week, I learned in a Franklin Method…
  • Womb-transplant baby phenomenon

    hquigley95
    8 Oct 2014 | 1:15 pm
    After the first successful womb-transplant effectively held and delivered a baby, more are on their way leading to a 2014/15 baby boom? Research has been going into this area for many years resulting in many failed attempt and miscarriages. The first woman to successfully receive, develop, carry and give birth to a womb transplant baby could not carry a baby herself naturally. Due to a condition of MS, multiple sclerosis her ovaries function normally. Therefore, an elderly family friend donated her uterus to the patient which could then carry her genetically own egg. There is still much…
  • The Bone Ages: MOSI on Down to the Manchester Science Festival, Sunday 2nd Nov 2014

    These Bones Of Mine
    3 Oct 2014 | 6:51 am
    A date for the diary for all bone and science lovers!  Skeletal researchers from the University of Sheffield and Manchester Metropolitan University will be at the Manchester Museum of Science & Industry (MOSI) on Sunday 2nd of November 2014 (from 10.30 am to 4 pm) helping to present an event called The Bone Ages to the public.  The Bone Ages will bring together the social sciences and lab based research in helping to present the wonders of studying the human skeleton, detailing how bones can teach us about the history, health and society of past populations and individuals using live…
  • STEM STUFF - Anatomy in Clay workshop series!

    BCLD
    2 Oct 2014 | 10:13 am
    We are really excited to share a brand new series of workshops with you! The Berthoud Community Library is launching a free, hand-on Anatomy in Clay workshop series for families! Drop in for Monday session, from 3:30pm to 4:30pm, October 6 through November 10. During these free, fun and interactive sessions, kids and adults will use clay to for human anatomy through a unique hands-on approach; the Anatomy in Clay Learning System.  They will form muscles, tendons, nerves and body systems on scale models of human hands, feet and whole body skeletons. The sessions will be held in our community…
  • The Stunning Diversity of Human Faces

    nathanlents
    1 Oct 2014 | 9:08 am
     Summary The shape and structure of the human face varies much more among individuals than do the faces of other species, even compared to species that have far more genetic diversity. The shapes of human faces vary more in the population than does any other physical feature. This high degree of facial diversity, which cuts across all racial groups, argues that human evolution has explicitly favored wide variance in human face shapes. Humans are a highly social species with remarkable skills in facial recognition, which develop very early in childhood. Therefore, the evolution of highly…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Physiology

  • My first Topology

    Eutykhia
    5 Oct 2014 | 1:42 am
    So, naturally we cant learn about these topics and subjects without giving it a go ourselves. I was a little dubious about starting this task as my head was swimming with all the other information i had sucked through my sponge head through the day. Everything was triangles, squares, circles, cubes, netting and my brain was spiralling out of control. Once I had gotten over being a drama queen… I started.     Now.. this is my first attempt on a Famous person, a 1950s vehicle of my choice and a leather sofa. Secretly hoping that this art would reach Grandmas Fridge because it…
  • BrainTrain

    relativitygirl
    4 Oct 2014 | 11:11 pm
    How much brain anatomy do you remember from high school? Forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain, what do the
  • Neuroanatomy An Atlas of Structures, Sections, and Systems.

    biologicalscienceslibrary
    4 Oct 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Duane E. HainesSixth edition DownloadSize: 05 Mb; Pages: 303
  • Color Atlas Of Neurology

    biologicalscienceslibrary
    4 Oct 2014 | 9:57 pm
    Reinhar RokhammThieme DownloadSize: 18 Mb; Pages: 448
  • Insulin

    Phil Conlan
    4 Oct 2014 | 12:22 pm
    Insulins role within the body is to transport glucose through cell membranes and into cells; a critical process. Following meals containing carbohydrate insulin is produced and released from beta cells within the pancreas. The release of insulin coincides with the glycemic response; the rise in plasma glucose following a meal containing carbohydrate. Regulation of insulin levels (insulin homeostasis) is achieved through insulin antagonists (adrenaline and cortisol) released from adrenal glands; returning to resting levels requires 1-2 hours.. Several factors influence the amount of insulin…
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    CasesBlog - Medical and Health Blog

  • How to Pick the Right Bedtime - select a wake up time, count back 7 hours and add 10 minutes to fall asleep

    20 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Given the importance of a good night's sleep, how do you pick the best possible bedtime? WSJ's Heidi Mitchell and Stanford University's Dr. Rafael Pelayo discuss with Tanya Rivero.Related:What Makes A Great Bedtime? | Craig Canapari, MD http://bit.ly/1vstZzJShift workers and people who get jet lag may gain weight because they dusturb their "inside garden" (gut microbes) buff.ly/1vzaXci Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
  • The top 50 science stars of Twitter according to AAAS/Science. What does it mean?

    16 Oct 2014 | 8:42 pm
    It's nice to be on the list of The top 50 science stars of Twitter according to AAAS/Science. However, the list is based on somewhat arbitrary criteria and is meant to provoke discussion rather than to be taken seriously. What is valuable, however, are some of the quotes by scientists interviewed for the story. A selection of the quotes is posted below. The skeptic view on TwitterFact of life: Most high-performing scientists have not embraced Twitter. Why? "Highest ranking chemist considers Twitter a waste of time that he’d much prefer spending on reading, writing papers".Twitter proponents…
  • 65-yo patient received a standard-dose flu shot already this season. Should she get the high-dose shot too? Or get a second regular flu shot?

    15 Oct 2014 | 5:34 am
    A 65-yo female patient received a standard-dose flu shot already this season. Should he get the high-dose shot too? Or try to get a second regular flu shot?The simple answer is no. The patients should consider herself immunized. Studies show that getting a delayed second dose doesn't necessarily increase antibody response, and there's some concern that it might actually have a negative effect on the immunity. If you've already had the regular seasonal dose, wait until next year for another dose.Image of the H1N1 Influenza Virus, CDC.From CDC's Immunize.org website:Sometimes patients age 65…
  • Why eating insects makes sense: same protein, less fat than beef, better for the planet (Economist video)

    14 Oct 2014 | 7:44 pm
    From The Economist: "An unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.About 2 billion people already eat bugs. Mexicans enjoy chili-toasted grasshoppers. Thais tuck into cricket stir-fries and Ghanians snack on termites. Insects are slowly creeping onto Western menus as novelty items, but most people remain squeamish. Yet there are three reasons why eating insects makes sense.First, they are healthier than meat. There are nearly 2,000 kinds of edible insects, many of them packed with protein, calcium, fibre, iron and zinc. A small…
  • How to get your research published: The BMJ's tips (video)

    14 Oct 2014 | 5:58 am
    In this video, the BMJ's research team discuss what they look for in a paper submitted for publication.They discuss some of the pitfalls authors fall into when writing up their research, and how to present some of the information that all journals will require.More BMJ-specific info here: http://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-authors Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook.
 
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    Journal of Applied Physiology current issue

  • Corrigendum

    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
  • Impact of increased hematocrit on right ventricular afterload in response to chronic hypoxia

    Schreier, D. A., Hacker, T. A., Hunter, K., Eickoff, J., Liu, A., Song, G., Chesler, N.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Chronic hypoxia causes chronic mountain sickness through hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) and increased hematocrit. Here, we investigated the impact of increased hematocrit and HPH on right ventricular (RV) afterload via pulmonary vascular impedance. Mice were exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen) for 10 (10H) or 21 days (21H). After baseline hemodynamic measurements, ~500 μl of blood were extracted and replaced with an equal volume of hydroxyethylstarch to normalize hematocrit and all hemodynamic measurements were repeated. In addition, ~500 μl of blood were…
  • Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure

    Cour, M., Abrial, M., Jahandiez, V., Loufouat, J., Belaidi, E., Gharib, A., Varennes, A., Monneret, G., Thibault, H., Ovize, M., Argaud, L.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA…
  • Systemic stiffening of mouse tail tendon is related to dietary advanced glycation end products but not high-fat diet or cholesterol

    Eriksen, C., Svensson, R. B., Scheijen, J., Hag, A. M. F., Schalkwijk, C., Praet, S. F. E., Schjerling, P., Kjaer, M., Magnusson, S. P., Couppe, C.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Tendon pathology is related to metabolic disease and mechanical overloading, but the effect of metabolic disease on tendon mechanics is unknown. This study investigated the effect of diet and apolipoprotein E deficiency (ApoE–/–) on mechanical properties and advanced glycation end product (AGE) cross-linking of non-weight-bearing mouse tail tendons. Twenty ApoE–/– male mice were used as a model for hypercholesterolemia along with 26 wild-type (WT) mice. One-half of the mice from each group was fed a normal diet (ND) and the other half was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to…
  • TrkB kinase activity maintains synaptic function and structural integrity at adult neuromuscular junctions

    Mantilla, C. B., Stowe, J. M., Sieck, D. C., Ermilov, L. G., Greising, S. M., Zhang, C., Shokat, K. M., Sieck, G. C.
    15 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    Activation of the tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) by brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely regulates synaptic transmission at adult neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The role of TrkB kinase activity in the maintenance of NMJ function and structure at diaphragm muscle NMJs was explored using a chemical-genetic approach that permits reversible inactivation of TrkB kinase activity in TrkBF616A mice by 1NMPP1. Inhibiting TrkB kinase activity for 7 days resulted in significant, yet reversible, impairments in neuromuscular transmission at diaphragm NMJs. Neuromuscular transmission…
 
 
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    Bone and Spine News -- ScienceDaily

  • Children who drink non-cow's milk are twice as likely to have low vitamin D

    20 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    Children who drink non-cow's milk such as rice, almond, soy or goat's milk, have lower levels of vitamin D in their blood than those who drink cow's milk, according to a new study.
  • Roman Gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank a tonic of ashes after training

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during excavations in the ancient city of Ephesos.
  • Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.
  • 'Mega' cells control growth of blood-producing cells

    19 Oct 2014 | 12:15 pm
    While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these “mega” cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).
  • Improving bladder function among people with spinal cord injuries

    17 Oct 2014 | 6:31 am
    New research may lead to dramatically fewer bladder infections following spinal cord injuries and other traumatic injuries -- infections that can cause kidney damage, and even death, scientists report.
 
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    Immune System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Salmonella-infected mice that were given antibiotics became superspreaders

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:29 pm
    Some people infected with pathogens spread their germs to others while remaining symptom-free themselves. Now, investigators believe they may know why. In a new study, Salmonella-infected mice that were given antibiotics became sicker and began shedding far more bacteria in their feces than they had before.
  • Head injury causes immune system to attack brain, new study finds

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:04 am
    Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. A new study showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. The authors suggest that if the findings apply to humans, this could help prevent brain damage from accidents, and protect players of contact sports like football, rugby and boxing.
  • Aspirin shown to benefit schizophrenia treatment

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:01 am
    Some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments, new research suggests. Research has shown that the immune system is linked to certain psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Research has shown that "antioxidants and anti-inflammatory drugs could not only reduce symptoms associated with the disorders but also prevent the appearance of neurobiological abnormalities and transition to psychosis if given early during brain development," experts say.
  • 'Mega' cells control growth of blood-producing cells

    19 Oct 2014 | 12:15 pm
    While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these “mega” cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).
  • Children's genes affect their mothers' risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    19 Oct 2014 | 6:46 am
    A child's genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother's risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men, experts say.
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    Nervous System News -- ScienceDaily

  • Sport in old age can stimulate brain fitness, but effect decreases with advancing age

    20 Oct 2014 | 10:49 am
    Physical exercise in old age can improve brain perfusion as well as certain memory skills, say neuroscientists who studied men and women aged between 60 and 77. In younger individuals regular training on a treadmill tended to improve cerebral blood flow and visual memory. However, trial participants who were older than 70 years of age tended to show no benefit of exercise.
  • Why your brain makes you reach for junk food

    20 Oct 2014 | 8:12 am
    Will that be a pizza for you or will you go for a salad? Choosing what you eat is not simply a matter of taste, conclude scientists in a new study. As you glance over a menu or peruse the shelves in a supermarket, your brain is making decisions based more on a food's caloric content.
  • Design of micro, nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:49 am
    Techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Both disorders affect the neurones: their structure and function is lost, and this in turn leads to the deterioration in the patient's motor, cognitive, sensory and emotional functions.
  • Head injury causes immune system to attack brain, new study finds

    20 Oct 2014 | 6:04 am
    Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. A new study showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. The authors suggest that if the findings apply to humans, this could help prevent brain damage from accidents, and protect players of contact sports like football, rugby and boxing.
  • Presence of enzyme may worsen effects of spinal cord injury and impair long-term recovery

    17 Oct 2014 | 6:29 am
    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of experiments, researchers suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. This link also presents new therapeutic possibilities.
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